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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - For many modern audiences, Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew is a troubling play that requires a few quick kicks to the misogynistic text to tame it into submission. The chief problem is the vexing ending. Having had her defiance - not to mention her free will - brainwashed out of her by her resolute bridegroom, newlywed Katherine counsels her fellow brides to "place your hands below your husband's foot." Nowadays this final scene is often performed ironically, suggesting that Kate, not her gloating husband Petruchio, actually has the upper hand.
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By Mike Giuliano | August 8, 2012
"The Taming of the Shrew" is such an unruly romantic comedy that there are advantages to staging it outdoors, where the running argument between a man and woman leads to some actual running. Although the Baltimore Shakespeare Factory production literally running in the meadow of Evergreen Museum & Library is more notable for its enthusiasm than its accomplishment, that kind of silliness is agreeable on a summer evening. It's also nice that the Baltimore Shakespeare Factory is helping to fill the void left by the defunct Baltimore Shakespeare Festival, which also staged its shows outdoors at Evergreen in north Baltimore and indoors at St. Mary's Outreach Center in Hampden.
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NEWS
November 11, 2007
School plays -- Bel Air High School drama students will perform 1960s suspense thriller Wait Until Dark, Thursday and Saturday in the auditorium, 100 Heighe St. Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, including Ivan Plis (left) as Petruchio and Kara Procell as Kate, will be performed Friday. Shows start at 7 p.m. $8 for adults, $7 for students and $6 for age 12 and under and 60 and over. 410-638-4600.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Reporter | July 26, 2008
In a year that saw a woman get remarkably close to a presidential nomination and a realistic chance at reaching the White House, it may be harder than usual to swallow the notion, expressed in the closing moments of Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, that the female sex shouldn't "seek for rule, supremacy and sway, when they are bound to serve, love and obey." But there has long been a way to deal with viewpoints in this play that now give offense to our gender-respecting souls - rev up the farcical side.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 19, 2003
Imagine a combination of Stomp, Dancing at Lughnasa and Riverdance, with a defiant dose of women's liberation thrown into the mix. That's the exuberant scene that erupts about a quarter of the way into the Royal Shakespeare Company's zesty production of John Fletcher's The Tamer Tamed at Washington's Kennedy Center. Like the frenzied dance scene in Brian Friel's Lughnasa, the dance in Tamer Tamed is an all-female explosion of uninhibited jubilation. Like Riverdance, it involves percussive footwork.
NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 2006
For three summers, the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company has mounted an outdoor production at the Patapsco Female Institute in Ellicott City. This year the troupe offers a double bill: a comedy, The Taming of the Shrew, alternating with the tragedy King Lear. The Shrew is given a bright, funny production by director Patrick Kilpatrick and a lively cast. It is the story of a wealthy man, Baptista, and his daughters, the rebellious, disagreeable Katharine and the quiet, obedient Bianca. Bianca has many admirers, but Baptista insists his elder and more troublesome daughter must be married first.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2004
At Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre, Shakespeare has been transported to the 1950s, where he seems at home amid City Dock's contemporary sounds of revving motors and occasional siren blasts. The Bard gains accessibility in this informal outdoor setting. Before The Taming of the Shrew begins, director Barry Genderson transports the audience back to the 1950s with such vintage recordings as Mario Lanza's "Be My Love," Rosemary Clooney's "Botch-A-Me" and Dean Martin's "That's Amore." The music enhances appreciation of the striking set, easily the best I've seen at Summer Garden and inspired by Genderson's fascination with surrealist artist Giorgio de Chirico.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 13, 1996
In "The Taming of the Shrew," the hero and heroine, Petruchio and Katharine, get married quickly -- only days after they've met. At Center Stage, director Jackson Phippin has taken his cue from the brevity of that courtship.He has staged hios modernized Shakespearean comedy with such rip-roaring pacing that the whole kit and caboodle --which includes not one, not two, but three weddings -- is wrapped up in a lickety-split hour and 50 minutes. And a fun hour and 50 minutes it is.The tone is set in the opening minutes, in which sound designer Mark Bennett introduces the play with a Neapolitan mandolin rendition of the theme from "The Godfather."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Reporter | July 26, 2008
In a year that saw a woman get remarkably close to a presidential nomination and a realistic chance at reaching the White House, it may be harder than usual to swallow the notion, expressed in the closing moments of Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, that the female sex shouldn't "seek for rule, supremacy and sway, when they are bound to serve, love and obey." But there has long been a way to deal with viewpoints in this play that now give offense to our gender-respecting souls - rev up the farcical side.
NEWS
By Jane Lippy and Jane Lippy,Contributing writer | May 22, 1991
Shakespeare's "The Taming of the Shrew" is running wild across the Westminster High School stage this weekend, complete with horses, wagons and spurs.A cast of 20 will portray the tale of Kate and Petruchio, shrew and suitor, with an added twist. The students opted for achange of venue, moving the scene of the Elizabethan comedy from merry olde England to the Wild West.The student actors are certainly "very creative and generous withideas," said English teacher Stacy Byrne, the play's director.
NEWS
November 11, 2007
School plays -- Bel Air High School drama students will perform 1960s suspense thriller Wait Until Dark, Thursday and Saturday in the auditorium, 100 Heighe St. Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, including Ivan Plis (left) as Petruchio and Kara Procell as Kate, will be performed Friday. Shows start at 7 p.m. $8 for adults, $7 for students and $6 for age 12 and under and 60 and over. 410-638-4600.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | September 22, 2006
In the opening chorus of Kiss Me, Kate, Cole Porter rhymes "show" with "Baltimo'." Somebody should have told him we don't pronounce it that way. But that is the only thing to complain about in the show, which runs through Nov. 19 at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia. Kiss Me, Kate boasts Porter's finest score: "Another Op'nin', Another Show," "Why Can't You Behave?," "Wunderbar," "So in Love," "We Open in Venice," "I Hate Men," "Were Thine That Special Face," "Too Darn Hot," "Where Is the Life that Late I Led?
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 15, 2006
There are various ways to tame Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, a comedy with a thorny wife-subjugation ending. Cole Porter turned it into the musical Kiss Me, Kate. The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company's approach comes closer to an Elizabethan episode of Upstairs, Downstairs. Love is not only in the air among the upper classes in director Patrick Kilpatrick's production, it also infects the servants. The play concerns two sisters -- sweet Bianca (Ashly Ruth Fishell) and older, vile-tempered Katherine (Kate Michelsen-Graham)
NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 2006
For three summers, the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company has mounted an outdoor production at the Patapsco Female Institute in Ellicott City. This year the troupe offers a double bill: a comedy, The Taming of the Shrew, alternating with the tragedy King Lear. The Shrew is given a bright, funny production by director Patrick Kilpatrick and a lively cast. It is the story of a wealthy man, Baptista, and his daughters, the rebellious, disagreeable Katharine and the quiet, obedient Bianca. Bianca has many admirers, but Baptista insists his elder and more troublesome daughter must be married first.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2004
At Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre, Shakespeare has been transported to the 1950s, where he seems at home amid City Dock's contemporary sounds of revving motors and occasional siren blasts. The Bard gains accessibility in this informal outdoor setting. Before The Taming of the Shrew begins, director Barry Genderson transports the audience back to the 1950s with such vintage recordings as Mario Lanza's "Be My Love," Rosemary Clooney's "Botch-A-Me" and Dean Martin's "That's Amore." The music enhances appreciation of the striking set, easily the best I've seen at Summer Garden and inspired by Genderson's fascination with surrealist artist Giorgio de Chirico.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 19, 2003
Imagine a combination of Stomp, Dancing at Lughnasa and Riverdance, with a defiant dose of women's liberation thrown into the mix. That's the exuberant scene that erupts about a quarter of the way into the Royal Shakespeare Company's zesty production of John Fletcher's The Tamer Tamed at Washington's Kennedy Center. Like the frenzied dance scene in Brian Friel's Lughnasa, the dance in Tamer Tamed is an all-female explosion of uninhibited jubilation. Like Riverdance, it involves percussive footwork.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 15, 2006
There are various ways to tame Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, a comedy with a thorny wife-subjugation ending. Cole Porter turned it into the musical Kiss Me, Kate. The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company's approach comes closer to an Elizabethan episode of Upstairs, Downstairs. Love is not only in the air among the upper classes in director Patrick Kilpatrick's production, it also infects the servants. The play concerns two sisters -- sweet Bianca (Ashly Ruth Fishell) and older, vile-tempered Katherine (Kate Michelsen-Graham)
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | September 22, 2006
In the opening chorus of Kiss Me, Kate, Cole Porter rhymes "show" with "Baltimo'." Somebody should have told him we don't pronounce it that way. But that is the only thing to complain about in the show, which runs through Nov. 19 at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia. Kiss Me, Kate boasts Porter's finest score: "Another Op'nin', Another Show," "Why Can't You Behave?," "Wunderbar," "So in Love," "We Open in Venice," "I Hate Men," "Were Thine That Special Face," "Too Darn Hot," "Where Is the Life that Late I Led?
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - For many modern audiences, Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew is a troubling play that requires a few quick kicks to the misogynistic text to tame it into submission. The chief problem is the vexing ending. Having had her defiance - not to mention her free will - brainwashed out of her by her resolute bridegroom, newlywed Katherine counsels her fellow brides to "place your hands below your husband's foot." Nowadays this final scene is often performed ironically, suggesting that Kate, not her gloating husband Petruchio, actually has the upper hand.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 13, 1996
In "The Taming of the Shrew," the hero and heroine, Petruchio and Katharine, get married quickly -- only days after they've met. At Center Stage, director Jackson Phippin has taken his cue from the brevity of that courtship.He has staged hios modernized Shakespearean comedy with such rip-roaring pacing that the whole kit and caboodle --which includes not one, not two, but three weddings -- is wrapped up in a lickety-split hour and 50 minutes. And a fun hour and 50 minutes it is.The tone is set in the opening minutes, in which sound designer Mark Bennett introduces the play with a Neapolitan mandolin rendition of the theme from "The Godfather."
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