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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2011
Blond and boyishly handsome, Vasily Petrenko might be mistaken for a gymnast, or perhaps a player of his favorite sport, soccer. But when the 35-year-old Russian conductor steps onto a podium, there's no doubt about his true calling. In 2009, Petrenko made a striking debut with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in an all-Russian program that included the most arresting Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich performances since Yuri Temirkanov stepped down as that ensemble's music director a few years earlier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2011
Blond and boyishly handsome, Vasily Petrenko might be mistaken for a gymnast, or perhaps a player of his favorite sport, soccer. But when the 35-year-old Russian conductor steps onto a podium, there's no doubt about his true calling. In 2009, Petrenko made a striking debut with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in an all-Russian program that included the most arresting Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich performances since Yuri Temirkanov stepped down as that ensemble's music director a few years earlier.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 26, 1994
HAMAR, Norway -- Viktor Petrenko remembered the little girl who was alone, the one that would sleep inside a skating rink, that would practice at all hours, refining jumps and spins, finally growing into an Olympic champion.He was once Ukraine's greatest skating champion. She was an orphan, Oksana Baiul. She never knew her father. Her mother was dead. So were her grandparents."She has had a difficult life," said Petrenko, the 1992 Olympic men's skating gold medalist. "And now, it's like she has gotten back what she has lost.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 31, 2009
It's a wonder the fire alarms didn't go off at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall on Thursday night. The incendiary matchup of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, guest conductor Vasily Petrenko and piano soloist Stephen Hough produced one of the most memorable concerts of the season. Tonight's repeat should be just as gripping. The Russian-born Petrenko, who became principal conductor of England's Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra in 2005 at age 29, put together a hefty program: Shostakovich's daunting Symphony No. 8; Tchaikovsky's sweeping Piano Concerto No. 1; and a rarity (on these shores)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 31, 2009
It's a wonder the fire alarms didn't go off at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall on Thursday night. The incendiary matchup of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, guest conductor Vasily Petrenko and piano soloist Stephen Hough produced one of the most memorable concerts of the season. Tonight's repeat should be just as gripping. The Russian-born Petrenko, who became principal conductor of England's Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra in 2005 at age 29, put together a hefty program: Shostakovich's daunting Symphony No. 8; Tchaikovsky's sweeping Piano Concerto No. 1; and a rarity (on these shores)
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
HAMAR, Norway -- The two former Olympic champions, Brian Boitano and Viktor Petrenko, left the ice muttering to themselves.The world champion, Kurt Browning, was last seen leaving the "kiss and cry area" wiping away a tear.And the leader was a guy in white lace gloves and matching collar named Alexei."I think it was just a weird night," American Scott Davis said.Definitely.Last night, unheralded Alexei Urmanov of Russia took the lead in what was billed as the greatest men's skating competition in history.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
HAMAR, Norway -- The two former Olympic champions, Brian Boitano and Viktor Petrenko, left the ice muttering to themselves.The world champion, Kurt Browning, was last seen leaving the "kiss and cry area" wiping away a tear.And the leader was a guy in white lace gloves and matching collar named Alexei."I think it was just a weird night," American Scott Davis said.Definitely.Last night, unheralded Alexei Urmanov of Russia took the lead in what was billed as the greatest men's skating competition in history.
SPORTS
By Jere Longman and Jere Longman,Knight-Ridder | February 14, 1992
ALBERTVILLE, France -- Elvis left the building last night, and along with him departed any semblance of predicted order in the Olympic men's figure-skating competition.Elvis would be Elvis Stojko of Canada, the 30th and final performer of the evening. By the time he had exited the Ice Hall in sixth place, men's figure skating had lapsed into terminal vertigo.Kurt Browning, the three-time world champion from Canada, bungled any reasonable chance at a gold medal.Paul Wylie, supposedly the only American without a chance at the gold, established himself as the only American WITH achance.
SPORTS
January 24, 1992
Nintendo president interested in MarinersThe Seattle Marios?A group of investors led by Hiroshi Yamauchi, president of Nintendo Co. Ltd. of Japan, yesterday announced an offer to buy the Seattle Mariners baseball team.Of the $125 million pledged, about $75 million would come from the president of Nintendo, source of "Donkey Kong" and Mario Brothers video games.The sale, which would represent the first non-North American ownership of a major-league baseball team, must be approved by Mariners owner Jeff Smulyan, 11 of 14 American League owners and seven of 12 National League owners.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1994
LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- Brian Boitano has seen the bright lights of the ice show circuit from New York to Paris.He has skated with Katarina Witt, performed in prime-time television specials, earned millions for turning triple jumps on a dime, night after night, year after year.But on the whole, this is where he would rather be, in another Winter Olympics, testing his skills and his courage against another generation of would-be figure skating kings."I wouldn't be here if I didn't think I could win," Boitano said.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 26, 1994
HAMAR, Norway -- Viktor Petrenko remembered the little girl who was alone, the one that would sleep inside a skating rink, that would practice at all hours, refining jumps and spins, finally growing into an Olympic champion.He was once Ukraine's greatest skating champion. She was an orphan, Oksana Baiul. She never knew her father. Her mother was dead. So were her grandparents."She has had a difficult life," said Petrenko, the 1992 Olympic men's skating gold medalist. "And now, it's like she has gotten back what she has lost.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
HAMAR, Norway -- The two former Olympic champions, Brian Boitano and Viktor Petrenko, left the ice muttering to themselves.The world champion, Kurt Browning, was last seen leaving the "kiss and cry area" wiping away a tear.And the leader was a guy in white lace gloves and matching collar named Alexei."I think it was just a weird night," American Scott Davis said.Definitely.Last night, unheralded Alexei Urmanov of Russia took the lead in what was billed as the greatest men's skating competition in history.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
HAMAR, Norway -- The two former Olympic champions, Brian Boitano and Viktor Petrenko, left the ice muttering to themselves.The world champion, Kurt Browning, was last seen leaving the "kiss and cry area" wiping away a tear.And the leader was a guy in white lace gloves and matching collar named Alexei."I think it was just a weird night," American Scott Davis said.Definitely.Last night, unheralded Alexei Urmanov of Russia took the lead in what was billed as the greatest men's skating competition in history.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 18, 1994
The TV Repairman:Someone, probably Coroebus, first winner of a gold medal 2,870 years ago, once uttered, "This is the Olympics, anything can happen."How true, how true."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1994
LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- Brian Boitano has seen the bright lights of the ice show circuit from New York to Paris.He has skated with Katarina Witt, performed in prime-time television specials, earned millions for turning triple jumps on a dime, night after night, year after year.But on the whole, this is where he would rather be, in another Winter Olympics, testing his skills and his courage against another generation of would-be figure skating kings."I wouldn't be here if I didn't think I could win," Boitano said.
SPORTS
March 28, 1992
Petrenko takes gold at figure skating worldsOlympic champion Viktor Petrenko of the Commonwealth of Independent States won the gold medal in the men's competition at the world figure skating championships last night in Oakland, Calif.Petrenko received two perfect marks of 6.0 for artistic impression and was scored highest by all nine judges.Canadian Kurt Browning, the three-time defending world champion, won the silver, and Canadian Elvis Stojko took a surprising third.Czechoslovakia's Petr Barna, who entered the long program in second place, dropped to sixth.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 18, 1994
The TV Repairman:Someone, probably Coroebus, first winner of a gold medal 2,870 years ago, once uttered, "This is the Olympics, anything can happen."How true, how true."
SPORTS
March 28, 1992
Petrenko takes gold at figure skating worldsOlympic champion Viktor Petrenko of the Commonwealth of Independent States won the gold medal in the men's competition at the world figure skating championships last night in Oakland, Calif.Petrenko received two perfect marks of 6.0 for artistic impression and was scored highest by all nine judges.Canadian Kurt Browning, the three-time defending world champion, won the silver, and Canadian Elvis Stojko took a surprising third.Czechoslovakia's Petr Barna, who entered the long program in second place, dropped to sixth.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | February 16, 1992
ALBERTVILLE, France -- It was Oscar Night at the Winter Olympics:The men wore black.The jury handed out a lifetime achievement award.And a guy named Elvis was sent off to the heartbreak hotel.But for American Paul Wylie, all the craziness surrounding a sport in transition could not ruin last night's perfect ending.The 27-year-old Harvard graduate didn't get the Olympic gold, but he got the silver medal in the men's figure skating final."This is one to stop on," Wylie said. "I'm glad I don't have to endure going down the tubes."
SPORTS
By Jere Longman and Jere Longman,Knight-Ridder | February 14, 1992
ALBERTVILLE, France -- Elvis left the building last night, and along with him departed any semblance of predicted order in the Olympic men's figure-skating competition.Elvis would be Elvis Stojko of Canada, the 30th and final performer of the evening. By the time he had exited the Ice Hall in sixth place, men's figure skating had lapsed into terminal vertigo.Kurt Browning, the three-time world champion from Canada, bungled any reasonable chance at a gold medal.Paul Wylie, supposedly the only American without a chance at the gold, established himself as the only American WITH achance.
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