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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 11, 1992
Without P.D.Q. Bach -- "the last and least of J. S. Bach's 20-odd children" -- Peter Schickele thought he'd have an easy year.It hasn't worked out that way for the 56-year-old Schickele -- the creator of the fictitious P.D.Q. -- who took an "extended sabbatical" last year after 25 years of touring as the equally fictitious Professor Peter Schickele, the nutty chairman of the department of music pathology at the University of Southern North Dakota in Hoople and P.D.Q.'s "discoverer." Schickele's tours and his 14 records -- all of them best-sellers and three of them Grammy winners -- made him the clown prince of classical music.
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By Tim Smith ... and Tim Smith ...,sun music critic | July 20, 2007
"My greatest love is Bach," says Baltimore filmmaker Michael Lawrence. "He has driven my life. But there hasn't been a decent film made on Bach." Lawrence plans to change that. Filming is set to start next month on a project that will focus not on the biographical side of Johann Sebastian Bach but rather on the power and genius of his music and the artists who are drawn to it. "Bach films are either stuffy, period-looking things, or they just involve going around Germany to places where he lived," Lawrence says.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 6, 2004
Alan Jay Lerner, a distinguished Broadway lyricist, once said of his native land, "We are not an aria country. We are a song country." Maybe he has a point, because Saturday night at Jim Rouse Theatre there wasn't an aria within earshot as Frances Motyca Dawson and her Columbia Pro Cantare Chorus provided an American songfest so diverse in its offerings that, toward the end, it resembled a vaudeville show, with one musical act following another....
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | June 14, 2007
"My mother told me that I started entertaining people when I was 18 months old," says Peter Schickele. If You Go "P.D.Q. Bach: The Jekyll and Hyde Tour" is 8 p.m. Saturday at the Gordon Center, 3506 Gwynnbrook Ave., Owings Mills. $10. 800-830-3976, ext. 108, or mooreatix.com.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | June 14, 2007
"My mother told me that I started entertaining people when I was 18 months old," says Peter Schickele. If You Go "P.D.Q. Bach: The Jekyll and Hyde Tour" is 8 p.m. Saturday at the Gordon Center, 3506 Gwynnbrook Ave., Owings Mills. $10. 800-830-3976, ext. 108, or mooreatix.com.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2004
"I hear America singing," wrote Walt Whitman, and if you'd like to share in the great poet's auditory joy this weekend, Columbia is surely the place to do it. On Saturday evening at Jim Rouse Theatre, Columbia Pro Cantare, one of Maryland's finest choirs, will present a mini-festival of American choral music under its founding director, Frances Motyca Dawson. At center stage will be none other than Peter Schickele, the composer and musical commentator who has won great fame as the satirical musicologist who "discovered" the hilarious works of PDQ Bach, the mythical 22nd child of Johann Sebastian Bach who created such, er, classics as "Oedipus Tex," "Concerto for Horn & Hardart," and the heart-rending madrigals, "The Queen To Me a Royal Pain Doth Give," and "My Bonnie Lass She Smelleth."
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By Stephen Wigler | October 4, 1992
Peter Schickele performs in a one-man showPeter Schickele is best-known as the creator -- or is it perpetrator? -- of P.D.Q. Bach. But Schickele is also a first-rate composer who has written with equal success for symphony orchestras, television, movies and chamber ensembles. The Baltimore Choral Arts Society will present Schickele in a one-man show called "Concert/Cabaret" Friday and Sunday at 8 p.m. in Kraushaar Auditorium on the Goucher College campus. Schickele will accompany singer David Duesing in the songs that the composer has been writing since the early '50s.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 11, 1992
Without P.D.Q. Bach -- "the last and least of J. S. Bach's 20-odd children" -- Peter Schickele thought he'd have an easy year.It hasn't worked out that way for the 56-year-old Schickele -- the creator of the fictitious P.D.Q. -- who took an "extended sabbatical" last year after 25 years of touring as the equally fictitious Professor Peter Schickele, the nutty chairman of the department of music pathology at the University of Southern North Dakota in Hoople and P.D.Q.'s "discoverer." Schickele's tours and his 14 records -- all of them best-sellers and three of them Grammy winners -- made him the clown prince of classical music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | March 14, 2002
St. Patrick's Day Parade Celebrate the luck of the Irish Sunday at the 46th annual St. Patrick's Day Parade in Baltimore. Beginning at 2 p.m., tip your hat to about 100 bands, marching units, leprechauns and floats, including the Baltimore Marching Ravens, the Monumental City Ancient Fife and Drum Corps, the Washington Scottish Pipe Band, the McKean Highlander Marching Band and the Chesapeake Caledonian Pipe Band. The parade steps off at Centre and Charles streets, proceeds south along Charles to Pratt Street, turns left and disbands at Market Place.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith ... and Tim Smith ...,sun music critic | July 20, 2007
"My greatest love is Bach," says Baltimore filmmaker Michael Lawrence. "He has driven my life. But there hasn't been a decent film made on Bach." Lawrence plans to change that. Filming is set to start next month on a project that will focus not on the biographical side of Johann Sebastian Bach but rather on the power and genius of his music and the artists who are drawn to it. "Bach films are either stuffy, period-looking things, or they just involve going around Germany to places where he lived," Lawrence says.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH | October 22, 2006
SCTV -- BEST OF THE EARLY YEARS -- Shout! Factory / $39.95 Even its fans tend to describe SCTV in relation to Saturday Night Live, claiming it was an edgier version of SNL, or a more unified version, or one with a less-political edge. But SCTV, a Canadian import that debuted in 1976, stands just fine on its own. In fact, save for perhaps the first two or three seasons of SNL, SCTV may represent the most inventive sketch comedy to be seen on television since the days of Sid Caesar's Your Show of Shows.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 6, 2004
Alan Jay Lerner, a distinguished Broadway lyricist, once said of his native land, "We are not an aria country. We are a song country." Maybe he has a point, because Saturday night at Jim Rouse Theatre there wasn't an aria within earshot as Frances Motyca Dawson and her Columbia Pro Cantare Chorus provided an American songfest so diverse in its offerings that, toward the end, it resembled a vaudeville show, with one musical act following another....
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2004
"I hear America singing," wrote Walt Whitman, and if you'd like to share in the great poet's auditory joy this weekend, Columbia is surely the place to do it. On Saturday evening at Jim Rouse Theatre, Columbia Pro Cantare, one of Maryland's finest choirs, will present a mini-festival of American choral music under its founding director, Frances Motyca Dawson. At center stage will be none other than Peter Schickele, the composer and musical commentator who has won great fame as the satirical musicologist who "discovered" the hilarious works of PDQ Bach, the mythical 22nd child of Johann Sebastian Bach who created such, er, classics as "Oedipus Tex," "Concerto for Horn & Hardart," and the heart-rending madrigals, "The Queen To Me a Royal Pain Doth Give," and "My Bonnie Lass She Smelleth."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | March 14, 2002
St. Patrick's Day Parade Celebrate the luck of the Irish Sunday at the 46th annual St. Patrick's Day Parade in Baltimore. Beginning at 2 p.m., tip your hat to about 100 bands, marching units, leprechauns and floats, including the Baltimore Marching Ravens, the Monumental City Ancient Fife and Drum Corps, the Washington Scottish Pipe Band, the McKean Highlander Marching Band and the Chesapeake Caledonian Pipe Band. The parade steps off at Centre and Charles streets, proceeds south along Charles to Pratt Street, turns left and disbands at Market Place.
FEATURES
By Jeanne Cooper and Jeanne Cooper,Boston Globe | July 9, 1995
Hugh Grant's on the cover of People (July 13), blessedly not in the infamous mug shot, but it's ironically the July issue of Vogue, published well before the English actor's arrest on charges of lewd conduct, that gives the most insight into why he was caught indulging in auto eroticism.In Candace Bushnell's profile, titled "Rake's Progress," the interviewer is amused but never fully taken in by the --ing, self-deprecating, deliberately "naughty" actor. The ironies, of course, don't end with the headline.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | October 4, 1992
Peter Schickele performs in a one-man showPeter Schickele is best-known as the creator -- or is it perpetrator? -- of P.D.Q. Bach. But Schickele is also a first-rate composer who has written with equal success for symphony orchestras, television, movies and chamber ensembles. The Baltimore Choral Arts Society will present Schickele in a one-man show called "Concert/Cabaret" Friday and Sunday at 8 p.m. in Kraushaar Auditorium on the Goucher College campus. Schickele will accompany singer David Duesing in the songs that the composer has been writing since the early '50s.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH | October 22, 2006
SCTV -- BEST OF THE EARLY YEARS -- Shout! Factory / $39.95 Even its fans tend to describe SCTV in relation to Saturday Night Live, claiming it was an edgier version of SNL, or a more unified version, or one with a less-political edge. But SCTV, a Canadian import that debuted in 1976, stands just fine on its own. In fact, save for perhaps the first two or three seasons of SNL, SCTV may represent the most inventive sketch comedy to be seen on television since the days of Sid Caesar's Your Show of Shows.
FEATURES
August 11, 1991
A festival of double-reed instrumentsThere's going to be double-reed madness this month at Towson State University. That's because this week the university is hosting the 20th anniversary conference of the Double Reed Society. The following week Towson State will present individual seminars on the English horn and the bassoon.Between Tuesday and Saturday more than 600 bassoonists, oboists English hornists and contrabassoonists from throughout the world -- some from as far away as South Africa, Korea and Japan -- will be in Towson to play their instruments (more than 35 concerts in all)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 11, 1992
Without P.D.Q. Bach -- "the last and least of J. S. Bach's 20-odd children" -- Peter Schickele thought he'd have an easy year.It hasn't worked out that way for the 56-year-old Schickele -- the creator of the fictitious P.D.Q. -- who took an "extended sabbatical" last year after 25 years of touring as the equally fictitious Professor Peter Schickele, the nutty chairman of the department of music pathology at the University of Southern North Dakota in Hoople and P.D.Q.'s "discoverer." Schickele's tours and his 14 records -- all of them best-sellers and three of them Grammy winners -- made him the clown prince of classical music.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 11, 1992
Without P.D.Q. Bach -- "the last and least of J. S. Bach's 20-odd children" -- Peter Schickele thought he'd have an easy year.It hasn't worked out that way for the 56-year-old Schickele -- the creator of the fictitious P.D.Q. -- who took an "extended sabbatical" last year after 25 years of touring as the equally fictitious Professor Peter Schickele, the nutty chairman of the department of music pathology at the University of Southern North Dakota in Hoople and P.D.Q.'s "discoverer." Schickele's tours and his 14 records -- all of them best-sellers and three of them Grammy winners -- made him the clown prince of classical music.
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