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By Asahi News Service | August 20, 1992
TOKYO -- Japanese children are hooked on Peter Rabbit. The translations of "The Tale of Peter Rabbit" and other children's books written and illustrated by British author Beatrix Potter (1866-1943) are among Japanese children's favorite foreign story books."The series, which offers high quality humor, was one that I had always wanted to publish," said Atsuo Saito, director of Fukuinkan Shoten Publishers, which started publishing the series in Japanese in 1971, 40 years after the first translation of Potter's works had been introduced to Japan.
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By Lane Page | April 29, 2014
It's been a couple of growing seasons since the Enchanted Garden at Howard County's Miller Branch Library has taken root, its trees and bushes branching, perennials spreading, annuals blossoming and edibles bursting with nutrients and flavor. Developed next to the children's area of the library, its total space may consist of a mere quarter-acre, but Oasis Design Group, Live Green Landscape Associates LLC and many volunteers have managed to tuck in some 65 varieties of woody and perennial plants plus varying annuals, benches for relaxation and contemplation, a pond, a stream and even a couple of sculptures.
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NEWS
By Beverly K. Fine | April 9, 1993
WHAT literary character hops into the minds of children, as well as the young in heart, at Easter? Quick as a bunny, out pops the answer: Peter Rabbit!Therefore, on the centennial of the rambunctious rabbit's entrance into the world of children's literature, we present him with the Golden Carrot Award for best performance in an animal literary series.And to his creator, Beatrix Potter, we express gratitude for igniting the imagination of millions of readers.Born in London in 1866, Beatrix Potter summered with her family in the bucolic Scottish countryside.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 9, 2007
Miss Potter puts into seductive, hand-crafted form the struggle of a woman to plot out her fate fourscore years before "Miss" became "Ms." It's a lovingly wrought biopic about Beatrix Potter (Renee Zellweger), the most successful children's author until J.K. Rowling cooked up a Potter named Harry. Director Chris Noonan (Babe) and writer Richard Maltby Jr. pick up her story at the turn of the 20th century, when she's in her 30s and about to sell The Tale of Peter Rabbit. From the start, you feel you're in for a treat.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | October 13, 2002
Long before there was Harry Potter, there was Beatrix Potter. And during this month, the 100th anniversary of the publishing of The Tale of Peter Rabbit, it is appropriate to revisit the phenomenal success of this English author, one nearly as improbable as that of Harry's creator, J.K. Rowling. Potter, the beloved children's storyteller whose delicate drawings of the world of woodland creatures continue to charm, was born in 1866 to nouveaux riches parents who had little to do with her thereafter.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 9, 2007
Miss Potter puts into seductive, hand-crafted form the struggle of a woman to plot out her fate fourscore years before "Miss" became "Ms." It's a lovingly wrought biopic about Beatrix Potter (Renee Zellweger), the most successful children's author until J.K. Rowling cooked up a Potter named Harry. Director Chris Noonan (Babe) and writer Richard Maltby Jr. pick up her story at the turn of the 20th century, when she's in her 30s and about to sell The Tale of Peter Rabbit. From the start, you feel you're in for a treat.
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By Anne Valdespino and Anne Valdespino,Orange County Register | April 4, 1993
Translated into 25 languages, reprinted more than 250 times, Beatrix Potter's "The Tale of Peter Rabbit" is read and reread wherever children snuggle up to parents for story time.This year, as the mischievous bunny celebrates his 100th anniversary in print, he also leaps into the video age when the Family Channel presents the first installment of "The World of Peter Rabbit and Friends." It premiered Monday night and repeats at 6 p.m. today and 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. April 11.Many storybooks such as "Charlotte's Web" and "Beauty and the Beast" have been adapted for the screen with phenomenal success.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | June 8, 1993
LONDON -- Contrary to what the Chinese calendar might say, this is the year of the rabbit.At least it is in England, in about a score of other countries around the world and in the hearts of rabbit lovers everywhere.Rabbit lovers, that is, not in the culinary or gustatory sense. Rather in the literary, metaphorical, allegorical, historical, even hopeful sense.Peter Rabbit is a hundred years old this year. That's an ancient age for a rabbit, even for an imaginary one in a book. But Peter is a different breed of bunny entirely.
FEATURES
September 30, 1998
Are you a city mouse or a country mouse? Your children will like these stories, no matter where you live.For city dwellers:"Eloise," by Kay Thompson"Eleanor," by Barbara Cooney"Apt. 3," by Ezra Jack Keats"The Cricket in Times Square,"by George Seldon"The Little House," by Virginia Lee Burton"Taxi: A Book of City Words,"by Betsy MaestroFor country folks:"The Little House," by LauraIngalls Wilder"Time of Wonder," by RobertMcCloskey"The Tale of Peter Rabbit,"by Beatrix Potter"All the Places to Love,"by Patricia MacLachlan- Courtesy Barnes & Noble,Annapolis Harbour CenterPub Date: 9/30/98
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By Los Angeles Daily News | March 6, 1994
The story of Peter Rabbit is well-known to many, but the life of English author Beatrix Potter may not be as familiar a tale.Potter, who died in 1943 at age 77, was a naturalist, businesswoman, farmer and conservationist as well as the creator of beloved children's books.Her varied life is the subject of the exhibit "Through the Garden Gate: The World of Beatrix Potter," through May 15 at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County."I think, in the back of her mind, children's stories were the last thing she wanted to be known for," says Laura Lee Martin, traveling exhibits coordinator with the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, which organized the exhibit.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | February 6, 2007
It's tempting to imagine Peter Rabbit peering out from beneath a hedge in Linda Lear's bewitching English-style garden. Lear recently published a biography of Beatrix Potter, the British author who created such beloved characters as Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny, Jemima Puddleduck and Squirrel Nutkin in her illustrated children's books. It's true that a river glimpsed from Lear's home in Bethesda is the Potomac, and not a tributary meandering through the Scottish border country, which provided inspiration for many of Potter's classic stories.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | December 8, 2006
A stage musical about a bunch of kids, with never a grown-up in sight? That was a new idea in 1967, but an unknown writer-composer named Clark Gesner pulled off the trick with astonishing success. You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown debuted in an off-Broadway theater and stayed there for 1,597 performances. Road companies took the show around the country for years. It's still being performed to enthusiastic audiences, as is demonstrated by the Student-Alumni Arts Production at Howard Community College, which runs through Dec. 17. "Peanuts," the basis for Gesner's work, first appeared in newspapers in 1950.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | October 13, 2002
Long before there was Harry Potter, there was Beatrix Potter. And during this month, the 100th anniversary of the publishing of The Tale of Peter Rabbit, it is appropriate to revisit the phenomenal success of this English author, one nearly as improbable as that of Harry's creator, J.K. Rowling. Potter, the beloved children's storyteller whose delicate drawings of the world of woodland creatures continue to charm, was born in 1866 to nouveaux riches parents who had little to do with her thereafter.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2000
ONE OF THE great passages in children's literature occurs on the second page of a little book conceived in England a century ago and published privately in time to be given as a Christmas present in 1901:"`Now my dears,' said old Mrs. Rabbit one morning, `you may go into the fields or down the lane, but don't go into Mr. McGregor's garden. Your father had an accident there; he was put in a pie by Mrs. McGregor.'" Millions of readers know, of course, that Peter Rabbit, brother of the better-behaved Flopsy, Mopsy and Cotton-tail, ignored his mother's warning and came perilously close to meeting the same fate as his father.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2000
Furnishings take it easy on environment Free-lance designer Inna Alesina has created a lot of things in her career -- wristwatches, furniture, an infant drinking cup -- but when she designs for herself, everything is green. That's green as in environmentally friendly; Alesina uses recycled materials such as egg cartons, drinking straws and shredded paper to create household objects that are functional and mysteriously beautiful. Her Good Egg ottoman ($150) is made from egg crates stacked, shaped, and strapped together.
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By Tricia Eller | January 26, 2000
Does your mouth water when Raggedy Ann and Andy pull taffy or when Laura Ingalls Wilder describes the fresh, hot baked-goods her mother made? You can bring these characters and their tempting treats to life using cookbooks designed for kids and centered on the plots of some of their favorite stories. Such cookbooks teach children that reading is fun and has a purpose. Kay Vandergrift, a professor of children's literature at Rutgers University, has compiled a list of cookbooks developed from stories, many that go back to your own days of childhood.
NEWS
By Lyn Backe and Lyn Backe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 1996
COUNTY students celebrated Youth Art Month by donating dozens of artworks to the Annapolitan Assisted Living Center.The art came from West Annapolis, Windsor Farm, Southgate, South Shore, Annapolis and Eastport elementary schools, Central Middle School and South River and Annapolis high schools.Sue Owens, event chairwoman, was enthusiastic as she described the importance of the project in the educational curriculum."Creating artworks helps children increase their awareness of the world around them and different ways of seeing the world," she said.
FEATURES
By Tricia Eller | January 26, 2000
Does your mouth water when Raggedy Ann and Andy pull taffy or when Laura Ingalls Wilder describes the fresh, hot baked-goods her mother made? You can bring these characters and their tempting treats to life using cookbooks designed for kids and centered on the plots of some of their favorite stories. Such cookbooks teach children that reading is fun and has a purpose. Kay Vandergrift, a professor of children's literature at Rutgers University, has compiled a list of cookbooks developed from stories, many that go back to your own days of childhood.
FEATURES
September 30, 1998
Are you a city mouse or a country mouse? Your children will like these stories, no matter where you live.For city dwellers:"Eloise," by Kay Thompson"Eleanor," by Barbara Cooney"Apt. 3," by Ezra Jack Keats"The Cricket in Times Square,"by George Seldon"The Little House," by Virginia Lee Burton"Taxi: A Book of City Words,"by Betsy MaestroFor country folks:"The Little House," by LauraIngalls Wilder"Time of Wonder," by RobertMcCloskey"The Tale of Peter Rabbit,"by Beatrix Potter"All the Places to Love,"by Patricia MacLachlan- Courtesy Barnes & Noble,Annapolis Harbour CenterPub Date: 9/30/98
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1997
It's been such a riveting three-parter on "Law & Order," I almost hate to see it end. But it does, tonight."Friends" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Whiny Ross has a tough time of things, what with Rachel going out on her first date since their break-up. And Monica keeps trying to fall in love with a millionaire who thinks she's just swell. NBC."The World of Peter Rabbit and Friends" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- With Easter just around the corner, CBS puts something for the kids on prime time: adaptations of two stories from the pen of Beatrix Potter.
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