Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPeter Pan
IN THE NEWS

Peter Pan

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
The boy who never grew up, but learned how to fly, has fascinated children - and adults who still remember being young - since he first soared above a London stage in a hit play by J.M. Barrie in 1904. More than a century later, audiences can have fun learning how that boy turned into Peter Pan, thanks to another hit play, this one landing in Baltimore on Tuesday to start a two-week engagement at the Hippodrome . "Peter and the Starcatcher," which earned a slew of Tony Awards after its 2012 Broadway run, is an eventful show loaded with humor and heart, not to mention surprise.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Liam Durbin, For The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
The California Chrome doubters who were talking about his slow Kentucky Derby time had to find something else to nitpick when California Chrome posted the fastest Preakness time since Curlin in 2007. And some who still remain doubters today have suggested that California Chrome's successes in the first two legs of the Triple Crown have had an element of luck in them. Every clean trip is fortunate, of course, but California Chrome has a way of making his own luck. In the Derby, he stayed close to an honest pace and avoided traffic problems that doomed some others.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 25, 1999
James M. Barrie's "Peter Pan" will fly back to the Olney Theatre Center stage for a holiday run, opening tomorrow. First produced at Olney in 1997, this is the non-musical adaptation of Barrie's classic 1904 play about a boy who refuses to grow up.This time around, the title role is being played by Carolyn Pasquantonio, who portrayed Wendy in 1997. Traber Burns plays the dual roles of Mr. Darling and Captain Hook, and Helen Hedman returns to the role of Mrs. Darling. The production is co-directed by Jim Petosa and David Bryan Jackson.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | May 25, 2014
As Triple Crown contender California Chrome went about his daily routine Saturday in preparation for the $1.5 million Belmont Stakes, a sizable field was shaping up to challenge the Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner in the 11/2-mile race. As many as 11 could line up against California Chrome, who galloped 13/4 miles over a sloppy track at 6 a.m., picking up the pace as he went through the Belmont Park stretch a second time. “That's the way he gallops all the time,” said Alan Sherman, son of and assistant to California Chrome's trainer, Art Sherman.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 8, 1994
GARDEN CITY, N.Y. -- Peter Pan, the fairy tale character who flies through the sky and battles with pirates, has been grounded by a new foe: the 1990s debate over multiculturalism.A middle school in Southampton canceled last month its production of "Peter Pan," scheduled to open last weekend, because administrators found that its portrayal of Indians was offensive to members of the Shinnecock tribe, whose reservation is on the town's border and whose children make up about 9 percent of the district's student body.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 9, 1997
J. M. Barrie's classic 1904 play, "Peter Pan," need not necessarily be just for kids. But the production at Olney Theatre Center essentially is.Although the play has some intriguing adult themes -- intriguing enough to have had psychological syndromes named for them -- Olney's production just hasn't grown up. Director Jim Petosa seems to have cartoons in mind, not literature, judging from the overly broad portrayals he elicits from most of the pirates, not...
FEATURES
May 19, 1999
Daring, mischievous, adventurous and unforgettable, Peter Pan is the boy who refuses to grow up. Prior to residing in Neverland, second star to the right and straight on till morning, Peter lived with the fairies in Kensington Gardens. Peter spends his time flying, traveling, sparring with Captain Hook, and playing with the Lost Boys, Tinker Bell and the Darling children.Peter Pan isn't just the star of stage, screen and animation. He stars in books, too. Here are some of them:* "Peter Pan to the Rescue: Walt Disney," by Golden Look-Look Books* "Peter Pan and Wendy," by J.M. Barrie* "Peter Pan: Where are Wendy's Brothers?"
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1990
THE CATHY RIGBY ''Peter Pan'' that opened last night at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre is a lively, bouncy presentation, and it isn't just because Rigby, a former Olympic gymnast, is appearing in the lead role. She is certainly an asset, but she isn't the only one; the direction is another. Cast members Stephen Hanan, Lauren Thompson and Cindy Robinson also turn in strong performances.Fran Soeder did the staging, and he has this ''Peter Pan'' moving at a lively pace. At yesterday's matinee, it ran little more than two and one-half hours, and that included the post-curtain business which you will certainly want to see, so don't be too eager to leave the place.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 5, 1990
Mary Martin claimed she couldn't remember a day when she didn't want to be Peter Pan.And although the actress, who died yesterday at age 76, performed many other notable roles in a career spanning five decades, it is as Peter Pan that she will be best remembered.At yesterday's sold-out matinee at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, "Peter Pan's" latest star, Cathy Rigby, came out in street clothes before the curtain went up and, with tears in her eyes, informed the audience of Miss Martin's death.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 1, 1990
Cathy Rigby may be the bestest flyingest Peter Pan ever. In the Broadway-bound production that opened at the Mechanic Theatre last night, she dips, she soars, she spins and spins and spins, and all at the highest of heights.But that won't surprise anyone who watched the former gymnast in the 1968 and 1972 Olympics.The question is: Does her singing and acting soar?Ms. Rigby's acting definitely has the joyful spunk to make audiences cheer for the boy who wouldn't grow up. If her singing has more character than lyricism, well, keep in mind that she is playing a boy, not a diva.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Early on in "Peter and the Starcatcher," the ingenious and brilliantly performed play now at the Hippodrome, there's a flashback to a grim orphanage in England where the boy who will become Peter Pan by the end of the show endures brutal treatment. As the ugly business is reenacted, a voice softly emerges amid the din from a corner of the stage, singing the opening lines of a work from the mid-19th century by Felix Mendelssohn, a work that Victorians loved: "O for the wings, for the wings of a dove, far away, far away would I rove.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
The boy who never grew up, but learned how to fly, has fascinated children - and adults who still remember being young - since he first soared above a London stage in a hit play by J.M. Barrie in 1904. More than a century later, audiences can have fun learning how that boy turned into Peter Pan, thanks to another hit play, this one landing in Baltimore on Tuesday to start a two-week engagement at the Hippodrome . "Peter and the Starcatcher," which earned a slew of Tony Awards after its 2012 Broadway run, is an eventful show loaded with humor and heart, not to mention surprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
This being summer, Baltimore's Young Victorian Theatre Company is reveling in the glories of Gilbert and Sullivan. This year's production of 'H.M.S. Pinafore' got Midweek Madness thinking about this sequence from a "Peter Pan" cartoon that finds Captain Hook breezing through the score to the operetta in one minute.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2012
Sharon Brazell from Severna Park was hoping someone would have the recipe for the hush puppies that were served at the Peter Pan Inn in Urbana. The restaurant, which closed in 1986, was famous for its plentiful family-style meals and beautiful setting. Brazell said her family, like many in the 1950s, '60s and '70s, would make the drive to the country restaurant near Frederick for special occasions to enjoy the food and setting, which included peacocks parading in the gardens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2010
J.M. Barrie, creator of "Peter Pan," deserves wider recognition for his other works. Rep Stage is doing its part with the revival of two subtly emotional, World War I-vintage plays, deftly directed by Michael Stebbins. "The New World," from 1915, takes place in a London drawing room. "Rogie" Torrance is to depart soon for the army. His mother wants him to have quality time alone with his father first, but this is a family with major hang-ups about closeness. Bill Largess is telling as the buttoned-up father.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
Before "Bandslam" came along, Maryland-bred actor Gaelan Connell's biggest role was Michael Darling in Irene Lewis' 2002 Center Stage production of "Peter Pan." "I got to fly," he whoops. "It was really cool. They had pirates and people flying across the stage and it was very magical. If you can imagine me at age 13, a much smaller me with even bigger hair. ..." Connell stops and laughs at the "surreality" of it all. He's gone from levitating in his jammies to playing the character in "Bandslam" who wins the trust of Aly Michalka and the heart of Vanessa Hudgens.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 28, 1990
Cathy Rigby has a lot to crow about.These days she's crowing eight times a week as the title character in the national tour of "Peter Pan," which begins a one-month run at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre Tuesday.The production -- now midway through a 58-city tour -- also will mark Ms. Rigby's Broadway debut when it arrives at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre for a six-week engagement beginning Dec. 11.A two-time Olympic gymnast and the first American woman to win a medal in world gymnastics competition, the 37-year-old mother of four can be proud of her personal life as well.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | September 23, 1990
In video the seasons come and go as they do everywhere, if not always in sync with seasons in other entertainments with which video competes for time and attention.Early autumn, for example, with a new TV season unfolding, is usually a slower period in video stores. But this fall there are some big titles to promote -- three principal specimens being "Pretty Woman," with Julia Roberts and Richard Gere, one of the best box-office performers of all time (Oct. 19); "Total Recall," with Arnold Schwarzenegger (Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts, Sarah Kickler Kelber, Mary Carole McCauley, Rashod D. Ollison, Tim Smith and Michael Sragow | January 22, 2009
POP MUSIC Truckers tour Drive-By Truckers hail from Athens, Ga., and sport a sound that melds brash Southern hard rock with erudite lyrics. The band's style deepens on its latest album, the solid Brighter Than Creation's Dark, released early last year. The band performs tomorrow at Recher Theatre, 512 York Road, Towson. Tickets are $25. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.com. FILM 'Hook' The Rotunda Cinematheque is presenting a free showing at 10 a.m. Saturday of Hook, Steven Spielberg's 1991 movie about a grown-up Peter Pan (Robin Williams)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.