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By Dallas Morning News | May 14, 1993
"Don't ever tangle with a Texan," an American friend told Peter O'Toole on his first trip to the States. Actually, he used a shorter, more expressive verb. But the advice impressed the British actor so much that he flew to Texas the first chance he got."I stayed with some chums of a chum (in Paris, Texas)," Mr. O'Toole said on a recent visit to Dallas. "And we just bowled about. We went to see the Red River. We came to Dallas. Just to get a little whiff. Flying here was extraordinary. I looked at some of the fields, and they were the size of Ireland."
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 9, 2007
Roger Michell, the 50-year-old director of Venus, is quick to point out that it's the first lead role in a movie that Peter O'Toole has chosen to do in 20 years. Maybe what drew the famously lusty and flamboyant O'Toole is a character who, despite impending mortality, persists in his right to feel amorous and unbowed. Venus marks the second time in three years that the South African-born British director Michell and the 52-year-old Pakistani-British novelist/screenwriter Hanif Kureishi have showcased stellar performances that incarnate the ecstasies of people in their 60s or 70s. The Mother (2003)
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By Michael Hill | March 21, 1991
The PBS Mystery series goes full-tilt Gothic in an unusual one-night, 2 1/2 -hour movie that will be on Maryland Public Television, Channels 22 and 67, tonight at 9 o'clock.Peter O'Toole is the big name in "Dark Angel," but the star is young Beatie Edney as Maud, a 19th century teen-ager who has led a life of virtual isolation on her eccentric father's palatial estate.It's the flip side of Jane Austen country, where the long distances between the moneyed types do not breed a well-mannered naivete, but instead allow evil to fester unnoticed, and unchecked.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 9, 2007
In Venus, Peter O'Toole's eyes still glitter with curiosity despite a body that's near-cadaverous and a face that's unnervingly skull-like. And that curiosity mingles splendidly with arousal when his character, the aging British actor Maurice Russell, claps those orbs on a sullen, barely literate teenager named Jessie (Jodie Whittaker). Maurice responds at once to the banked energy that some adolescents exude simply lolling on the sofa. Jessie responds in her own slow and surly way to his appreciation.
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By Barbara Samson Mills | July 18, 1993
LOITERING WITH INTENT:THE CHILDPeter O'TooleHyperion! 198 pages, $21.95Peter O'Toole's autobiography holds two surprises. It tells nothing about his acting career, and it is extraordinarily well-written; indeed, some of this narrative of his early years could well be rearranged as viable poetry. Throughout, Mr. O'Toole writes in an Irish dialect that is sometimes unintelligible. No matter. The music and color come through, and the view of his childhood is exceptional, sensitive and delightful reading.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 21, 1991
Peter O'Toole is deliciously dissolute, mysterious and downright creepy in "The Dark Angel," an ultra-Baroque thriller at 9 tonight on MPT (Channels 22 and 67).But tonight's installment in the PBS "Mystery" series is not really about the character O'Toole plays, Silas Ruthyn. Instead it is about Silas' niece, Maud (Beatie Edney). The central story line of the heroine's passage from adolescence to adulthood is what makes "The Dark Angel" such a nifty 2 1/2 hours of TV.The plot is simple and profound the way fairy tales are simple and profound.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1998
You don't need brains or guns or manpower to defeat evil. Just question its manhood.Thus says "Phantoms," a new horror flick from the pen of Dean Koontz that would have been an OK film five years ago, but now just seems silly and way too labyrinthine for its own good.Two sisters (Joanna Going and Rose McGowan) drive into the little town of Snowfield, Colo. Little Sis (McGowan) has been having a tough time of it in L.A., and Big Sis (Going) figures some time in a small town is just what she needs to right herself.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 9, 2007
In Venus, Peter O'Toole's eyes still glitter with curiosity despite a body that's near-cadaverous and a face that's unnervingly skull-like. And that curiosity mingles splendidly with arousal when his character, the aging British actor Maurice Russell, claps those orbs on a sullen, barely literate teenager named Jessie (Jodie Whittaker). Maurice responds at once to the banked energy that some adolescents exude simply lolling on the sofa. Jessie responds in her own slow and surly way to his appreciation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 23, 2003
Peter O'Toole is a magnificent, unique actor who blends the naked emotion of the boldest psycho-dramatists with the dash and magnetism of gallant matinee idols. He's too big a bird to be pigeonholed, and not only because of his lean, tall, flowing presence. Critics, audiences and studio heads alike tend to typecast leading men as romantic figures, character actors or stage-trained class acts, but O'Toole defies categories, drawing on huge reservoirs of charisma, insight and eloquence in varying combinations every time out. He's also the only figure at the Academy Awards whose many nominations have all come in recognition of great, inimitable characterizations rather than popularity or staying power.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | February 15, 1991
'King Ralph' Starring John Goodman, Peter O' Toole, Camille Coduri and John Hurt.Directed by David Ward.Released by Universal.Rated PG.* If your periodontist has a sense of humor then spending 9minutes in his chair might be as much fun as "King Ralph."This movie about a Las Vegas lounge pianist who ascends to the throne of England has about three good scenes -- all of which are included in the trailer that has been making the rounds in local theaters and on TV. This is a thin movie after you've seen the entire royal family electrocuted (the accident that brings John Goodman's Ralph to the throne)
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By DAN RODRICKS | May 6, 2004
THIS IS THE golden anniversary of a particularly golden year in the golden age of television. In 1954, the number of TV stations in the United States more than doubled, advertising revenue surpassed radio revenue for the first time, and Swanson introduced the TV dinner. NBC telecast the Tournament of Roses Parade, for the first time in color. ABC broadcast the Army-McCarthy hearings live. And on CBS, the crusading Edward R. Murrow dissected Joe McCarthy in historic telecasts that turned public opinion against the Commie-hunting senator.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 23, 2003
Peter O'Toole is a magnificent, unique actor who blends the naked emotion of the boldest psycho-dramatists with the dash and magnetism of gallant matinee idols. He's too big a bird to be pigeonholed, and not only because of his lean, tall, flowing presence. Critics, audiences and studio heads alike tend to typecast leading men as romantic figures, character actors or stage-trained class acts, but O'Toole defies categories, drawing on huge reservoirs of charisma, insight and eloquence in varying combinations every time out. He's also the only figure at the Academy Awards whose many nominations have all come in recognition of great, inimitable characterizations rather than popularity or staying power.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1998
You don't need brains or guns or manpower to defeat evil. Just question its manhood.Thus says "Phantoms," a new horror flick from the pen of Dean Koontz that would have been an OK film five years ago, but now just seems silly and way too labyrinthine for its own good.Two sisters (Joanna Going and Rose McGowan) drive into the little town of Snowfield, Colo. Little Sis (McGowan) has been having a tough time of it in L.A., and Big Sis (Going) figures some time in a small town is just what she needs to right herself.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 16, 1997
The subject is John Barrymore and Christopher Plummer.Here's the quiz. Which actor has or had:Major success in the title roles of "Richard III" and "Hamlet"?A personal life earmarked by alcohol and multiple marriages?A film career considered less distinguished than his stage work?A daughter who followed in her father's career footsteps?If you answered "both" to each question, you will appreciate the coup of casting Plummer in the new William Luce play, "Barrymore," which begins a pre-Broadway run at the Mechanic Theatre Tuesday.
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By John F. Kelly | October 4, 1993
LOITERING WITH INTENT: THE CHILD. By Peter O'Toole. Hyperion. 198 pages. $21.95.THIS is by no means your typical show-biz autobiography. The author, actor Peter O'Toole, doesn't blame his parents for all his problems, and the publisher doesn't emblazon the star's name and photograph on the book jacket and underneath, in small print, add "with So-and-so" (So-and-so actually having written the book).No, Mr. O'Toole, perhaps best known for his role as "Lawrence of Arabia" (but equally as deserving of praise for his part in "My Favorite Year")
NEWS
By Barbara Samson Mills | July 18, 1993
LOITERING WITH INTENT:THE CHILDPeter O'TooleHyperion! 198 pages, $21.95Peter O'Toole's autobiography holds two surprises. It tells nothing about his acting career, and it is extraordinarily well-written; indeed, some of this narrative of his early years could well be rearranged as viable poetry. Throughout, Mr. O'Toole writes in an Irish dialect that is sometimes unintelligible. No matter. The music and color come through, and the view of his childhood is exceptional, sensitive and delightful reading.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Movie Critic | September 14, 1990
He's back and, boy, do we need him now.He's T.E. Lawrence, scourge of the desert, who is returning to the epic screen at the Senator in the form of 70-millimeter print of David Lean's 1962 classic, "Lawrence of Arabia."According to Tom Kiefaber, the owner of the Senator, the original five-week run of "Lawrence" played to more than 20,000 patrons in the spring of last year. On its last night, a Tuesday, more than 200 people were turned away from the 900-seat theater on York Road."Since then," Kiefaber says, "I've been barraged with calls requesting its return.
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By Dallas Morning News | May 14, 1993
"Don't ever tangle with a Texan," an American friend told Peter O'Toole on his first trip to the States. Actually, he used a shorter, more expressive verb. But the advice impressed the British actor so much that he flew to Texas the first chance he got."I stayed with some chums of a chum (in Paris, Texas)," Mr. O'Toole said on a recent visit to Dallas. "And we just bowled about. We went to see the Red River. We came to Dallas. Just to get a little whiff. Flying here was extraordinary. I looked at some of the fields, and they were the size of Ireland."
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