Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPeter Lynch
IN THE NEWS

Peter Lynch

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 5, 2000
BOSTON - When Peter Lynch joined Fidelity Investments as a research analyst in 1969, his salary was $16,000 a year. He was worth it, he says, only because of his education at Boston College and the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. On Thursday, he formally repaid the debt to his undergraduate alma mater. At a campus ceremony, Boston College touted a $10 million gift from Lynch and his wife, Carolyn, and named its School of Education for the couple. In an interview, Lynch said his father - a teacher who earned a master's degree at Boston College and who died when Lynch was 10 - left him with a deep belief in the importance of education and mentoring the young.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Mike Porter and Mike Porter,MORNINGSTAR.COM | August 31, 2003
Flipping through Peter Lynch's Beating the Street the other day, I came across this chestnut - Lynch calls it "Peter's Principle 14" - that made me shake my head: "If you like the store, chances are you'll love the stock." I love the do-it-yourself ethos of the former Fidelity Magellan manager's books. They serve to say, "Yes, you too can be a stock-picker!" But this particular adage I'd sooner call "Peter's Mistake 14." The last thing you want to do is buy a stock just because you like the store.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By WERNER RENBERG and WERNER RENBERG,1993 By Werner Renberg | May 2, 1993
When Peter Lynch talks about selecting stocks for a portfolio and managing the portfolio -- as he did so successfully for the 13 years that he managed Fidelity Magellan Fund until his 1990 retirement -- it's worth listening.The same goes for what he has to say about selecting mutual funds and managing your own fund portfolio, as he does briefly in his latest book, "Beating the Street."Much of the book is devoted to recollections of how he chose stocks as Magellan manager and to other stock-picking matters -- including his familiar advice that investors seek opportunities in companies they know something about or whose products they use.But for those who prefer to invest in mutual funds and let professionals do the stock picking for them, Lynch offers a strategy for selecting funds.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 19, 2002
If you are certain that the stock market is not to be trusted, with its accounting scandals and its everyday risks, then pull out before the next crash. If the Social Security system will fail soon and if inflation will reignite, if interest rates are set to skyrocket and upset everything, if higher gasoline prices persist, then stash that cash. But, if you need a break from Enron and Andersen and the rest of today's economic fears, then read on. Because a few minutes with Peter Lynch, probably one of the best stock-pickers of our time, will help you rediscover the classic case for owning stocks.
BUSINESS
By Mike Porter and Mike Porter,MORNINGSTAR.COM | August 31, 2003
Flipping through Peter Lynch's Beating the Street the other day, I came across this chestnut - Lynch calls it "Peter's Principle 14" - that made me shake my head: "If you like the store, chances are you'll love the stock." I love the do-it-yourself ethos of the former Fidelity Magellan manager's books. They serve to say, "Yes, you too can be a stock-picker!" But this particular adage I'd sooner call "Peter's Mistake 14." The last thing you want to do is buy a stock just because you like the store.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 19, 2002
If you are certain that the stock market is not to be trusted, with its accounting scandals and its everyday risks, then pull out before the next crash. If the Social Security system will fail soon and if inflation will reignite, if interest rates are set to skyrocket and upset everything, if higher gasoline prices persist, then stash that cash. But, if you need a break from Enron and Andersen and the rest of today's economic fears, then read on. Because a few minutes with Peter Lynch, probably one of the best stock-pickers of our time, will help you rediscover the classic case for owning stocks.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | February 28, 2001
March is historically an "up" month in Wall Street, with the Standard & Poor's 500 stock index gaining an average 1.2 percent during the past 50 years. "More junk [high-yield, low quality] bonds were issued in January 2001, than in all of the fourth quarter of 2000. Last year, Moody's downgraded a record 470 corporations' bonds. Junk bond defaults rose 6 percent and are expected to increase to 10 percent this year." (Income Digest) MONEY MATTERS: "Far more money has been lost by investors trying to protect themselves from market downturns than by downturns themselves."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | October 3, 1997
HERE'S SOME investment advice that is good for all seasons:"Getting rich is not about picking hot stocks or guessing the economy. It is about how well you manage your money. You don't spend relative performance. Nor can you get rich from it." (Laszlo Birinyi in Forbes, Oct. 13.)"Don't sweat those market swings. Volatility is above average-- but by no means at unprecedented levels." (Business Week, Oct. 6.)"Deadly Sins of Mutual Fund Managers: (1) Chasing performance. Although 'hot' stocks are tempting, they're often too tempting.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 4, 1995
NEW YORK -- When Nike Inc.'s Air Pegasus running shoes helped ease Miles Spencer's shin splints and knee pain, the Connecticut investment banker ran to buy Nike stock.Investors like Mr. Spencer are taking their insights about sports and sporting goods to the stock market, using their years as weekend warriors for more than just friendly competition. Since the beginning of the year, when he put his money where his feet were, Mr. Spencer's investment has grown about five percent.The trained eye of a shrewd consumer is, after all, one of the best investment tools, mutual fund master Peter Lynch said in his best-selling 1989 book "One Up on Wall Street."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 13, 1996
Holiday hints about your money:If you buy stocks with bonus money -- or give shares as holiday gifts -- don't overlook local issues. Some recent developments: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. appears under "Appealing High-Yielding Stocks" in the Nov. 27 S&P Outlook. The stock yields 6 percent, double the current inflation rate.The Dec. 4 Outlook lists Black & Decker under "Economically Sensitive Stocks We Favor." A B&D spokesperson says the company's SnakeLight flexible flashlights are selling "extremely well as holiday gifts."
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | February 28, 2001
March is historically an "up" month in Wall Street, with the Standard & Poor's 500 stock index gaining an average 1.2 percent during the past 50 years. "More junk [high-yield, low quality] bonds were issued in January 2001, than in all of the fourth quarter of 2000. Last year, Moody's downgraded a record 470 corporations' bonds. Junk bond defaults rose 6 percent and are expected to increase to 10 percent this year." (Income Digest) MONEY MATTERS: "Far more money has been lost by investors trying to protect themselves from market downturns than by downturns themselves."
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 5, 2000
BOSTON - When Peter Lynch joined Fidelity Investments as a research analyst in 1969, his salary was $16,000 a year. He was worth it, he says, only because of his education at Boston College and the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. On Thursday, he formally repaid the debt to his undergraduate alma mater. At a campus ceremony, Boston College touted a $10 million gift from Lynch and his wife, Carolyn, and named its School of Education for the couple. In an interview, Lynch said his father - a teacher who earned a master's degree at Boston College and who died when Lynch was 10 - left him with a deep belief in the importance of education and mentoring the young.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | October 3, 1997
HERE'S SOME investment advice that is good for all seasons:"Getting rich is not about picking hot stocks or guessing the economy. It is about how well you manage your money. You don't spend relative performance. Nor can you get rich from it." (Laszlo Birinyi in Forbes, Oct. 13.)"Don't sweat those market swings. Volatility is above average-- but by no means at unprecedented levels." (Business Week, Oct. 6.)"Deadly Sins of Mutual Fund Managers: (1) Chasing performance. Although 'hot' stocks are tempting, they're often too tempting.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | August 15, 1997
MOST PEOPLE know that Tuesday marked the 15th anniversary of the start of the Great Bull Market -- a span in which the Dow Jones industrial average surged from 776.92 to 8,062.11.But what were the "experts" predicting then, just as the market was hitting bottom?Daniel Long, Corbyn Associates, Baltimore: "We see good buying opportunities ahead."S&P Outlook: "It wouldn't take much to bring a flood of margin calls. Be very cautious."Joseph Granville: "Julius Westheimer said on national TV that people would regret acting on my 'sell everything' advice.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 13, 1996
Holiday hints about your money:If you buy stocks with bonus money -- or give shares as holiday gifts -- don't overlook local issues. Some recent developments: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. appears under "Appealing High-Yielding Stocks" in the Nov. 27 S&P Outlook. The stock yields 6 percent, double the current inflation rate.The Dec. 4 Outlook lists Black & Decker under "Economically Sensitive Stocks We Favor." A B&D spokesperson says the company's SnakeLight flexible flashlights are selling "extremely well as holiday gifts."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | August 9, 1996
TO COPE with this roller-coaster market, here's some wisdom:"Always sell what shows you a loss and keep what shows a profit." (Jesse Livermore, highly successful investor.)"You can't win when you speculate. It's like holding a bear's tail. If you lose your hold, the bear will get you." ("Dollars & Sense," 1920.)"Invest in simple companies that appear dull, out of favor and haven't caught the fancy of Wall Street." ("One Up on Wall Street," by Peter Lynch.)MONEY FROM HOME: Woman's Day, Aug. 6, offers these hints under "How to Start a Home Business":"Consider a service business, like party planning, bill collecting, bridal consulting, bookkeeping.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | August 15, 1997
MOST PEOPLE know that Tuesday marked the 15th anniversary of the start of the Great Bull Market -- a span in which the Dow Jones industrial average surged from 776.92 to 8,062.11.But what were the "experts" predicting then, just as the market was hitting bottom?Daniel Long, Corbyn Associates, Baltimore: "We see good buying opportunities ahead."S&P Outlook: "It wouldn't take much to bring a flood of margin calls. Be very cautious."Joseph Granville: "Julius Westheimer said on national TV that people would regret acting on my 'sell everything' advice.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | May 27, 1993
The Dow Jones industrial average surged 23.53 points yesterday to close at an all-time high of 3,540.16, eclipsing the previous peak by 17 points. Sharply lower interest rates sparked the advance as investors shunned low-yielding CDs, T-bills, etc., and plowed money into stocks.WALL ST. WISDOM: "Don't worry about government economic reports, the Federal Reserve Board Index, the Consumer Confidence figures, the level of the stock market, the direction of interest rates or anything like that.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 4, 1995
NEW YORK -- When Nike Inc.'s Air Pegasus running shoes helped ease Miles Spencer's shin splints and knee pain, the Connecticut investment banker ran to buy Nike stock.Investors like Mr. Spencer are taking their insights about sports and sporting goods to the stock market, using their years as weekend warriors for more than just friendly competition. Since the beginning of the year, when he put his money where his feet were, Mr. Spencer's investment has grown about five percent.The trained eye of a shrewd consumer is, after all, one of the best investment tools, mutual fund master Peter Lynch said in his best-selling 1989 book "One Up on Wall Street."
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | August 23, 1994
Interest rates climbed sharply yesterday and the lackluster stock market sagged. As the 30-year government bond yield rose to 7.55 percent, the Dow Jones industrial average slipped 3.89 points, to close at 3,751.22. When interest rates rise, investors tend to shun stocks and buy higher-yielding CDs, T-bills and bonds instead.Speaking of Wall Street, we present today a string of brief stock, bond, mutual fund, business and other money-related items, many of which piled up while I vacationed:McCormick & Co. is listed under "Dividends Paid for 50 Years or More and Increased in Each of the Last 5 Years" in "S&P Outlook," Aug. 17."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.