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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | July 27, 1994
Peter Jennings devotes a prime-time hour tonight to the Haitian crisis -- which, with the way things are going in Rwanda, puts him one crisis behind. The real world is moving almost too quickly to keep up, but the world of television, tonight at least, is less active. In fact, except for a few scattered highlights, tonight's TV world is flat.* "Beverly Hills, 90210" (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- This episode from 1992 is one of several "90210" installments from this era featuring a now-familiar face: guest star Dean Cain, now starring in ABC's "Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman."
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NEWS
March 21, 2006
Bill Beutel, 75, the longtime television news anchor and host of the show that became ABC's Good Morning America, died Saturday at his home in Pinehurst, N.C. The cause of death was not disclosed. In 1975, Mr. Beutel hosted AM America, the network's national morning news show. His sign-off, "Good luck and be well," closed WABC's nightly local newscast for more than 30 years. Mr. Beutel, who won several Emmy awards and a Peabody award, began as a radio reporter in his hometown of Cleveland.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1997
If your circuits are overloaded and you have to choose tonight between running the air conditioner or watching TV, don't think twice. Stay cool."Seinfeld" (9 p.m.-9: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- In this repeat from February, George (Jason Alexander), ever the under-achiever, tries to find someone just as unambitious to receive the first Susan Ross Scholarship, in memory of his fiancee, who died tragically while licking envelopes containing their wedding invitations. NBC."New York Undercover" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45)
NEWS
November 23, 2005
NATIONAL U.S. terror suspect indicted Jose Padilla, a U.S. citizen whose more than three-year detention in a Navy brig without criminal charges has been a defining legal battle in the Bush administration's war on terrorism, was indicted by a federal grand jury in Miami. pg 1a Troop withdrawals likely Against a backdrop of calls from Iraqi leaders and the U.S. Congress to withdraw American troops, military officers and defense analysts said this week that reductions are likely in 2006 but Iraq will not be ready to take a lead role against insurgents before 2007.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1996
It's a night for comparisons, as TV offers you the chance to evaluate movie versions of "Little Women" made 60 years apart and performances by Richard Dreyfuss before and after he became famous."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 16, 2005
Eight days after the death of Peter Jennings, ABC News changed the title yesterday of its flagship newscast from World News Tonight with Peter Jennings to World News Tonight. The move was made with consultation and caution, according to ABC News President David Westin. "After consulting with Kayce [Jennings' wife] and family, we concluded that leaving the broadcast's title as it was through last Friday was an appropriate tribute to Peter," Westin wrote in an e-mail sent to the staff at ABC News yesterday.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | September 16, 2001
The news media have attracted both praise and criticism for their coverage since Tuesday's terrorist strikes. And yet, some of the most cogent running criticism comes from an unlikely source: chief ABC News anchor Peter Jennings. Since the disaster Tuesday morning, Jennings has been on the air as the primary host of ABC's news specials for more than 13 hours a day, without commercial breaks. (NBC's Tom Brokaw, who has also been broadcasting for hours on end, has been sharing some chores with Katie Couric of the network's Today Show.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 8, 2005
Peter Jennings, the urbane broadcaster whose dispassionate and reasoned manner at the ABC anchor desk helped see millions of viewers through such moments of national crisis as the 9/11 attacks, died yesterday of lung cancer. Mr. Jennings, who had been at the ABC anchor desk since 1983, was 67 years old. Mr. Jennings died at his home in New York, according to ABC News President David Westin. "Peter has been our colleague, our friend, and our leader in so many ways. None of us will be the same without him," Mr. Westin said.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 2, 1995
Finally, Peter Jennings and Donald Duck under the same roof.
NEWS
March 21, 2006
Bill Beutel, 75, the longtime television news anchor and host of the show that became ABC's Good Morning America, died Saturday at his home in Pinehurst, N.C. The cause of death was not disclosed. In 1975, Mr. Beutel hosted AM America, the network's national morning news show. His sign-off, "Good luck and be well," closed WABC's nightly local newscast for more than 30 years. Mr. Beutel, who won several Emmy awards and a Peabody award, began as a radio reporter in his hometown of Cleveland.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 16, 2005
Eight days after the death of Peter Jennings, ABC News changed the title yesterday of its flagship newscast from World News Tonight with Peter Jennings to World News Tonight. The move was made with consultation and caution, according to ABC News President David Westin. "After consulting with Kayce [Jennings' wife] and family, we concluded that leaving the broadcast's title as it was through last Friday was an appropriate tribute to Peter," Westin wrote in an e-mail sent to the staff at ABC News yesterday.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 9, 2005
The death of newsman Peter Jennings from lung cancer could affect the future of television news programs on every network and cable station, as well as test ABC's resourcefulness and judgment as it moves toward naming his successor as the anchor on its flagship World News Tonight. Jennings, whose death on Sunday came only months after the retirement of both CBS' Dan Rather and NBC's Tom Brokaw, was the last network anchor to have been welcomed every evening into tens of millions of American homes, and whenever national emergencies arose.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 8, 2005
Peter Jennings, the urbane broadcaster whose dispassionate and reasoned manner at the ABC anchor desk helped see millions of viewers through such moments of national crisis as the 9/11 attacks, died yesterday of lung cancer. Mr. Jennings, who had been at the ABC anchor desk since 1983, was 67 years old. Mr. Jennings died at his home in New York, according to ABC News President David Westin. "Peter has been our colleague, our friend, and our leader in so many ways. None of us will be the same without him," Mr. Westin said.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 30, 2005
Anchorman Peter Jennings, in a statement read last night on ABC World News Tonight, shared with viewers his feelings about his battle with lung cancer and expressed gratitude for the support he has received from fans and friends. The 66-year-old anchorman announced on the April 6 newscast that he had received the cancer diagnosis and shortly thereafter began treatment. "Thousands of you have spoiled me rotten with your attention in the last couple of weeks," Jennings said in a statement that was read on air by Elizabeth Vargas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 28, 2004
Last week, Dan Rather rocked the television world by announcing that in March he would step down as CBS Evening News managing editor and anchorman, thereby ending the longest tenure as chief news presenter in history. On Wednesday, Tom Brokaw will sign off as anchorman and managing editor of the NBC Nightly News, television's most popular newscast, after 21 years in that job. A report also is expected to be released this week about a 60 Minutes II story focusing on President Bush's military service that was presented on air by Rather and was based upon documents of questionable authenticity.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 2, 2004
Saddam Hussein was in court for only 26 minutes yesterday morning, but the TV news machine was in overdrive all day and into the night replaying, analyzing, interpreting and parsing every word and image. Was he defiant, or did he seem more like a "broken man," as one reporter who was in the room in which Saddam was arraigned yesterday morning described him? Did he look more like the ruthless dictator we had been regularly seeing on our TV screens since the first Gulf War, or the ragged man found cowering in a spider hole in December?
NEWS
September 2, 1993
A FAMILIAR face, but one not often seen anymore, popped up recently on a rerun of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" on cable TV's Nick at Nite.In this episode from about 1974, the fellow with the familiar face had a short scene with only a few lines. But when he made his unexpected appearance in the WJM newsroom, the surprised studio audience let out a robust round of applause that lasted some 15 to 20 seconds.Was this visitor a famous movie or TV actor? A beloved sports idol? A renowned public official?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 9, 2005
The death of newsman Peter Jennings from lung cancer could affect the future of television news programs on every network and cable station, as well as test ABC's resourcefulness and judgment as it moves toward naming his successor as the anchor on its flagship World News Tonight. Jennings, whose death on Sunday came only months after the retirement of both CBS' Dan Rather and NBC's Tom Brokaw, was the last network anchor to have been welcomed every evening into tens of millions of American homes, and whenever national emergencies arose.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2004
With the approach of June 30, the "official" day upon which power was to be handed over by the United States to the Iraqis, American television networks sent big-name journalists to Baghdad and planned elaborate coverage of the event. So yesterday when a makeshift ceremony occurred two days early - with scant warning and at about 2:30 a.m. - TV journalists scrambled to air stories that, at least initially, were noticed by few. "We woke up and got a Monday surprise," said Jon Banner, executive producer of ABC News' World News Tonight.
FEATURES
June 9, 2004
A lifeguard named `Dutch' Seventy-one years ago, when I was only 16 and my maiden name was Doris Winter and my home was Baltimore, Md., I went on a vacation with my family to Dixon, Ill., to visit my aunt. While there, my aunt took us to Lowell Park - a park on the banks of a beautiful river - for a picnic dinner. Around 5 o'clock, everyone had gone home except the lifeguard. Knowing I wanted to swim, my aunt called to him - everyone in small towns knows each other - "Dutch! Are you going to stay so my niece can take a quick dip?"
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