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NEWS
March 20, 2005
On Thursday, March 17, 2005, WILLIAM WALTER Feimer of Owings Mills. Beloved son of William Peter and Louise Victoria Feimer; caring brother of Susan Gallagher and Elisa Minarick. Remembered uncle to Laura and Peter Gallagher, and Jack and Beth Minarick. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at the St. Philip Neri Catholic Church on Monday at 9 A.M. Interment to follow at Glen Haven Memorial Park. Arrangements by Singleton Funeral Home. In lieu of flowers, Memorial contributions can be made to the Rosewood Center Volunteer Services, 200 Rosewood Lane, Owings Mills, Maryland 21117.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 1, 2005
On July 28, 2005, LOUISE VICTORIA FEIMER, of North Linthicum, loving wife of William Peter Feimer. Devoted mother of Elisa Minarick and her husband John, Susan Gallagher and her husband Michael and the late William Walter Feimer. Caring sister of Walter Simon and his wife Fran, Betty Miller and Bernadette Simon. Remembered grandmother of Jack and Beth Minarick, Laura and Peter Gallagher. Also survived by her loving niece Heidi Jacobson. The family will receive visitors at the family owned Singleton Funeral Home, P.A., 1 Second Avenue, S.W. (at Crain Highway)
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NEWS
August 1, 2005
On July 28, 2005, LOUISE VICTORIA FEIMER, of North Linthicum, loving wife of William Peter Feimer. Devoted mother of Elisa Minarick and her husband John, Susan Gallagher and her husband Michael and the late William Walter Feimer. Caring sister of Walter Simon and his wife Fran, Betty Miller and Bernadette Simon. Remembered grandmother of Jack and Beth Minarick, Laura and Peter Gallagher. Also survived by her loving niece Heidi Jacobson. The family will receive visitors at the family owned Singleton Funeral Home, P.A., 1 Second Avenue, S.W. (at Crain Highway)
NEWS
March 20, 2005
On Thursday, March 17, 2005, WILLIAM WALTER Feimer of Owings Mills. Beloved son of William Peter and Louise Victoria Feimer; caring brother of Susan Gallagher and Elisa Minarick. Remembered uncle to Laura and Peter Gallagher, and Jack and Beth Minarick. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at the St. Philip Neri Catholic Church on Monday at 9 A.M. Interment to follow at Glen Haven Memorial Park. Arrangements by Singleton Funeral Home. In lieu of flowers, Memorial contributions can be made to the Rosewood Center Volunteer Services, 200 Rosewood Lane, Owings Mills, Maryland 21117.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 20, 1991
LATE FOR DINNER'' is an anomaly, an old-fashioned film that might have been done in the '30s. It is also thoroughly delightful, spinning along, raising questions as it does, then settling everything with a postscript that is as amusing as it is inspired.W.D. Richter did the direction. He's the man who directed ''Buckaroo Banzai'' in 1984. He's done nothing since as a director, and it's nice to have him back.The film, which is really sci-fi, introduces us to two young men, brothers-in-law who have been involved in an incident that leaves one of them, Willie (Brian Wimmer)
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
Kidding soap opera is always a risky undertaking. It's difficult to parody an art form that wallows in self-parody. ''Tune in Tomorrow'' almost manages to overcome this hurdle. The opening 45 minutes are uneventful, but the second half of the film has an abundance of laughs.Peter Falk stars. He plays a soap writer who joins a radio station in 1951 New Orleans. Keanu Reeves is Martin, the young news writer at the station. Barbara Hershey is the 36-year-old woman who is twice divorced and is back home to find a third husband.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1997
On screen, Bill Murray is the luckiest guy in the world, and we love him for it.In "Stripes," he got to play Army and ended up with P.J. Soles. In "Ghostbusters," he got to save the world and ended up with Sigourney Weaver. In "Groundhog Day," he got to live the same day over and over until he got it right and ended up with Andie MacDowell.In "The Man Who Knew Too Little," he gets to play James Bond and ends up with Joanne Whalley. It's a charmed life, and it's a heck of a lot of fun to watch.
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | November 4, 2004
Don't worry about a sophomore slump for The O.C. The Fox drama returns tonight at 8 (WBFF, Channel 45) in scintillating form with more compelling depictions of teen angst and fractured families. Biting humor, however, remains the show's most surprising asset. The dialogue takes offbeat turns, such as when a mother explains why she must buy another pony for her daughter. "It's just not right for a little girl to love a hairless pony," the woman says. The lighter moments give the dramatic scenes punch and keep the show from sliding to mush.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 17, 1994
I haven't had to complain for a while about things being slow, but tonight TV seems to be taking a breather. There's a devilishly imaginative episode of "Northern Exposure," where the devil himself seems to be visiting Alaska -- but past that, there's not much going on.* "The Nanny." (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Without waiting the usual nine months, Fran (Fran Drescher) has a baby. She found it on the subway -- and took it home, one presumes, as a token of her affection. CBS.* "Melrose Place."
FEATURES
By Linell Smith VIDEO A cop with a shadow | September 21, 1991
ARTThe lay of the landA show of 49 pastels by Baltimore artist Raoul Middleman, on display at Artshowcase Gallery, investigates the emotional terrain of landscapes ranging from Vermont hills to the waters of the Susquehanna. Middleman knows the infinite ways that land and water and sky combine to provoke sudden, sharp memories. This is the opening exhibit for the new gallery, which is devoted to the work of Maryland artists. It also marks the 100th show for curator Jim Dockery. The show runs through Sept.
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | November 4, 2004
Don't worry about a sophomore slump for The O.C. The Fox drama returns tonight at 8 (WBFF, Channel 45) in scintillating form with more compelling depictions of teen angst and fractured families. Biting humor, however, remains the show's most surprising asset. The dialogue takes offbeat turns, such as when a mother explains why she must buy another pony for her daughter. "It's just not right for a little girl to love a hairless pony," the woman says. The lighter moments give the dramatic scenes punch and keep the show from sliding to mush.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 18, 2003
As tough as it is being a teen-ager, it's even tougher making a movie about teens that neither condescends nor oversimplifies. How to Deal does neither in its depiction of a young girl struggling with love, sex and independence, trying to find her place in the world at a time everyone insists she's too young to have one. The result is far from a great movie, but it's a noble effort that deserves plenty of credit for trying. Mandy Moore, playing a far more complex character than in her first film, A Walk to Remember, is Halley Martin, a conflicted and confounded 16-year-old who is certain of only one thing: She never wants to fall in love.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 28, 2002
Gary Cooper created his most classically chivalrous character as Longfellow Deeds, the big-hearted small-town hero who inherits a fortune and tries to use it for the greater good in Frank Capra's Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936). Planting slobby Adam Sandler in that same role makes you wonder what other marvels of miscasting Hollywood could achieve if the rest of Capra's canon were revamped. Reuniting Tom Green and Drew Barrymore for the Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert roles in It Happened One Night?
FEATURES
December 26, 1997
One of Hollywood's brawniest epics, director Stanley Kubrick's 1960 effort, "Spartacus" (noon-4 p.m., TNT), stars Kirk Douglas as the fearless leader of a slave rebellion in ancient Rome. Top-notch in all technical aspects, the film boasts a splendid ensemble cast of Laurence Olivier, Jean Simmons, Peter Ustinov and Charles Laughton. Tony Curtis comes up amusingly short, however, as a slave with a curious Brooklyn accent ("I am da singa of songs").At a glance"The Mighty Ducks" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1997
On screen, Bill Murray is the luckiest guy in the world, and we love him for it.In "Stripes," he got to play Army and ended up with P.J. Soles. In "Ghostbusters," he got to save the world and ended up with Sigourney Weaver. In "Groundhog Day," he got to live the same day over and over until he got it right and ended up with Andie MacDowell.In "The Man Who Knew Too Little," he gets to play James Bond and ends up with Joanne Whalley. It's a charmed life, and it's a heck of a lot of fun to watch.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 21, 1995
Is there any more delicate a contraption than a comedy? It makes the first flying machines look like Concordes. For example, here's "While You Were Sleeping," just barely airborne, wavering between oblivion and absurdity, almost stalling out a dozen times, then finally, somehow, awkwardly, desperately, triumphing at the end.The film is based on a premise that generates 90 minutes of amusing wrinkles, and that's where it gets into trouble: It's 120 minutes...
FEATURES
December 26, 1997
One of Hollywood's brawniest epics, director Stanley Kubrick's 1960 effort, "Spartacus" (noon-4 p.m., TNT), stars Kirk Douglas as the fearless leader of a slave rebellion in ancient Rome. Top-notch in all technical aspects, the film boasts a splendid ensemble cast of Laurence Olivier, Jean Simmons, Peter Ustinov and Charles Laughton. Tony Curtis comes up amusingly short, however, as a slave with a curious Brooklyn accent ("I am da singa of songs").At a glance"The Mighty Ducks" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 18, 2003
As tough as it is being a teen-ager, it's even tougher making a movie about teens that neither condescends nor oversimplifies. How to Deal does neither in its depiction of a young girl struggling with love, sex and independence, trying to find her place in the world at a time everyone insists she's too young to have one. The result is far from a great movie, but it's a noble effort that deserves plenty of credit for trying. Mandy Moore, playing a far more complex character than in her first film, A Walk to Remember, is Halley Martin, a conflicted and confounded 16-year-old who is certain of only one thing: She never wants to fall in love.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 17, 1994
I haven't had to complain for a while about things being slow, but tonight TV seems to be taking a breather. There's a devilishly imaginative episode of "Northern Exposure," where the devil himself seems to be visiting Alaska -- but past that, there's not much going on.* "The Nanny." (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Without waiting the usual nine months, Fran (Fran Drescher) has a baby. She found it on the subway -- and took it home, one presumes, as a token of her affection. CBS.* "Melrose Place."
FEATURES
By Linell Smith VIDEO A cop with a shadow | September 21, 1991
ARTThe lay of the landA show of 49 pastels by Baltimore artist Raoul Middleman, on display at Artshowcase Gallery, investigates the emotional terrain of landscapes ranging from Vermont hills to the waters of the Susquehanna. Middleman knows the infinite ways that land and water and sky combine to provoke sudden, sharp memories. This is the opening exhibit for the new gallery, which is devoted to the work of Maryland artists. It also marks the 100th show for curator Jim Dockery. The show runs through Sept.
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