Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPete Wilson
IN THE NEWS

Pete Wilson

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 7, 1995
SERVES HIM RIGHT. The collapse of California Gov. Pete Wilson's presidential bid logically follows the self-destruction of whatever reputation he had for intellectual integrity. He is a politician who turned flip-flopping into an Olympic event, an opportunist who would ban hot dogs from baseball if the polls said the fans wanted it that way.Let's look at the record.:* As a one-time U.S. senator, he fought a bill tightening immigration laws, arguing that agri-business in his state needed a million "guest workers" to harvest its crops.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | October 19, 2006
There are very few saints among people of any race, religion, national origin or sexual orientation. None should be above criticism. Increasingly, however, there are tighter and tighter restrictions on what you can say about more and more groups. San Francisco radio talk-show host Pete Wilson discovered this recently when he criticized a city supervisor and his female friend who had a baby together. The man is gay and the woman is a lesbian, so they are not lovers in a committed relationship.
Advertisement
NEWS
By BEN SHERWOOD | July 26, 1995
Being burnt in effigy is not every politician's idea of a good photo-op. But for California Gov. Pete Wilson, there's no better way to transform a sputtering political campaign into an inexorable force.In the summer of 1993, the first commercial of his re-election campaign aired. It featured black-and-white images of anti-Wilson demonstrators hurling fruit at the governor and breaking the glass door of the state office building. An announcer declared: ''Burned in effigy, pelted at speeches, the Capitol under siege -- his moves to change California have angered many.
NEWS
By Mitchell Landsberg and Mitchell Landsberg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 2003
At 11 a.m. today, Arnold Schwarzenegger will place his hand on a Bible and take the oath of office as California's 38th governor. It will be a simple, no-frills ceremony, his advisers say. There will be a few brass bands. Seven thousand or so invited guests. A five-story camera riser groaning with the weight of an international press corps. Live, national television coverage. Every living former governor of California, with the sole exception of Ronald Reagan. A Hollywood contingent expected to include Rob Lowe, Jamie Lee Curtis, Tom Arnold, Danny DeVito and Linda Hamilton.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | March 24, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- Casting his quest for the presidency as a "duty," Gov. Pete Wilson has set out to convince voters across the nation that the causes he has championed in California can restore fairness and common sense in Washington.Mr. Wilson yesterday announced the formation of an exploratory committee to assess his chances of winning the Republican nomination.While the "exploratory" framework might help save face if his candidacy flops, Mr. Wilson left no doubt of his intention.Entering the race relatively late and without extensive state organizations, Mr. Wilson's strategists plan a media campaign to take advantage of the compressed primary schedule.
NEWS
February 12, 1995
With Dan Quayle out of the race for the 1996 Republican presidential nomination, the spotlight shines ever more brightly on two Inside-the-Beltway contenders: Sens. Bob Dole of Kansas and Phil Gramm of Texas.But don't let the early line fool you. Before this marathon is over, a bunch of GOP governors will be heard from. Most especially Pete Wilson of California. And if he is the stopper of a Dole or Gramm bandwagon, Tommy Thompson of Wisconsin, John Engler of Michigan and William Weld of Massachusetts could jump in, thus creating the first open convention in a long, long time.
NEWS
August 30, 1995
Depending on how you look at it, California Gov. Pete Wilson either turned his back on the Statue of Liberty or embraced what she stands for -- legal immigration. "There is a right way to come to America and a wrong way," he said in New York as he announced his candidacy for president. "Illegal immigration is not the American way."Almost everyone agrees with that. And in fact many voters agree that legal immigration needs to be curbed.The Clinton administration has come out for reducing the number of refugees admitted into the country each year.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- If Republican Gov. Pete Wilson breathes on his bathroom mirror as he shaves these mornings, it undoubtedly clouds up. For Mr. Wilson, long given up for dead in his quest for a second term, signs of life are clearly detectable:* California's wildfires and earthquakes have enabled Mr. Wilson to repeatedly play the concerned chief executive on the scene before the TV cameras.* The gap in the Los Angeles Times Poll by which he trails the front-running Democrat, State Treasurer Kathleen Brown, has gone from 15 points in October to 10; and the gap by which he trails State Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi has fallen from 18 points to 5.* Ms. Brown's campaign has undergone a shake-up amid talk that she has not met expectations as a contender and has been letting Mr. Wilson off the hook on his record.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond ANDJules Witcover | June 26, 1991
Los Angeles -- WHEN Pete Wilson was elected governor o California last fall, it was easy to write him off as another George Bush -- a bland Yalie Republican in a gray suit and a red tie. In his eight years in the Senate he had never made a vivid impression on the political community, let alone the voters.But after six months in the governor's office, Wilson is demonstrating an aggressively activist brand of Republicanism that contrasts sharply with the cautious stewardship of President Bush.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 30, 1995
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Retired presidential candidate Pete Wilson champs a bit when he is asked how it feels to be back in the governor's chair after his brief, ill-fated flirtation with White House residency. He says he never stopped being a working governor, though ''the coverage of the campaign . . . created the impression I had gotten on a plane, waved goodbye and left the state forever.''In fact, he says, having had to labor into August getting his state budget through a legislature ''in disarray'' was a major factor in his inability to conduct a more effective campaign.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 28, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- In Bob Dole's uphill fight against President Clinton for California's 54 electoral votes, the Republican presidential nominee is looking for help from two favorite "wedge" issues of Gov. Pete Wilson -- immigration and affirmative action.But neither one now appears likely to save Dole here on election day, simply because a strong California economy is buoying Clinton's consistent popularity in the state and overshadowing divisions that are at the heart of the debates over these two issues.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | September 18, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- Although President Clinton continues to lead challenger Bob Dole by a mile in California -- 55 percent to 33 in the Field Poll -- the Dole campaign insists that its man will not concede the state to him as George Bush did four years ago.Ken Khachigian, the former Ronald Reagan aide who is the Dole campaign's chief in-state adviser, says ''a full state and field organization is being put in place with a fully funded get-out-the-vote plan'' to...
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | August 9, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- A year ago, Gov. Pete Wilson of California had hopes of coming here to the Republican National Convention to receive his party's 1996 presidential nomination. Instead, he has come as the convention's most prominent fly in the ointment on the abortion issue.Last August, Governor Wilson formally declared his candidacy for the nomination but a series of mishaps, political and personal, persuaded him in late September to withdraw. He was mired in single digits in the horserace polls and was struggling to raise money and to overcome the after-effects of throat surgery that made him a rasping, ineffective campaigner.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The seven Republican presidential candidates who have qualified for the election-year subsidy under the federal campaign-finance law have just learned that they will have to take IOUs from Uncle Sam for a while.Five active candidates -- Lamar Alexander, Pat Buchanan, Bob Dole, Phil Gramm and Dick Lugar -- and two who have already folded their tents -- Arlen Specter and Pete Wilson -- have been told by the Federal Election Commission that the federal campaign fund is about $15 million short of what's needed to give them their full entitled amounts on January 1.This is so although the source of the subsidy, the voluntary checkoff on individual income-tax returns, has been increased from $1 to $3 since the 1992 election.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 30, 1995
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Retired presidential candidate Pete Wilson champs a bit when he is asked how it feels to be back in the governor's chair after his brief, ill-fated flirtation with White House residency. He says he never stopped being a working governor, though ''the coverage of the campaign . . . created the impression I had gotten on a plane, waved goodbye and left the state forever.''In fact, he says, having had to labor into August getting his state budget through a legislature ''in disarray'' was a major factor in his inability to conduct a more effective campaign.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | October 23, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- When President Clinton flew into town the other night for a charity dinner, it was his 21st visit to California since his election. It did not take a mind reader to figure out why.Of all 50 states, none other is as important to his chances for re-election next year. As his new political agent in the state, Celia Fisher, puts it, ''Nobody wins the election without California. Nobody puts that map together.''That goes for the eventual Republican nominee as well, she contends.
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | August 9, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- A year ago, Gov. Pete Wilson of California had hopes of coming here to the Republican National Convention to receive his party's 1996 presidential nomination. Instead, he has come as the convention's most prominent fly in the ointment on the abortion issue.Last August, Governor Wilson formally declared his candidacy for the nomination but a series of mishaps, political and personal, persuaded him in late September to withdraw. He was mired in single digits in the horserace polls and was struggling to raise money and to overcome the after-effects of throat surgery that made him a rasping, ineffective campaigner.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 15, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- During the wildfires that swept through Southern California, a familiar figure on local television screens was Republican Gov. Pete Wilson, clad in blue denims and picking his way through the debris of burned-out houses at Laguna Beach, Malibu and other coastal towns.For an incumbent whose state is still mired in economic distress -- and himself in the public opinion polls -- the extensive television exposure was a political windfall. Being seen responding to human tragedy and needs never hurts any politician, although there has been some sniping at the timing of his responses and his failure last year to test a Canadian plane, called "the super scooper," that can lift 1,600 gallons of ocean water in seconds and drop it on a fire.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry | October 22, 1995
Several months ago I announced that I was willing to run for president of the United States and shoulder the immense crushing burden of accepting your cash contributions. Today I wish to reveal, in specific detail, exactly where I stand on the issues. Ready? Here goes:I agree with Colin Powell.I say this because, according to the polls, the American public is crazy nuts in love with Colin Powell, despite the fact that the average voter has no clue what he thinks about anything. Consider your own personal self.
NEWS
October 7, 1995
SERVES HIM RIGHT. The collapse of California Gov. Pete Wilson's presidential bid logically follows the self-destruction of whatever reputation he had for intellectual integrity. He is a politician who turned flip-flopping into an Olympic event, an opportunist who would ban hot dogs from baseball if the polls said the fans wanted it that way.Let's look at the record.:* As a one-time U.S. senator, he fought a bill tightening immigration laws, arguing that agri-business in his state needed a million "guest workers" to harvest its crops.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.