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Pete Sampras

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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 24, 2001
WIMBLEDON, England -- Here's the thing about predicting if Pete Sampras will ever lose his Wimbledon crown. Who, exactly, is going to beat him?. . . Still thinking? As Sampras prepares for tomorrow's opening-round Wimbledon match against Spain's Francisco Clavet, he remains the nearly unconquered, unchallenged grass-court king. Sure, the usual contenders will be trotted out, such as Andre Agassi, Patrick Rafter, Marat Safin, Lleyton Hewitt and Tim Henman. The fans also will cast long looks at the new American phenom, Andy Roddick.
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NEWS
By Todd Karpovich and Todd Karpovich,Special to The Sun | March 14, 2007
David Nguyen remembers being 7 and watching Pete Sampras on television, as the tennis great dominated opponents in far-flung places. It was not long afterward that Nguyen lobbied his parents for his own racket and the chance to take his game far from their Columbia home. Ten years later, Nguyen is starting his third season at Wilde Lake with big expectations. The junior is coming off a year in which he finished 21-0 and won Howard County, regional and state titles. "Pete Sampras inspired me, but I always just had a natural tendency toward tennis," Nguyen said.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 11, 1990
If economic sanctions don't cow Saddam Hussein, we'll have Pete Sampras serve to him.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2003
We always want them to go out on top, to leave our memories polished to a gleaming shine, with no trace of tarnish. Occasionally it happens with a note of perfection: Ted Williams hitting a home run in his last at-bat for the Boston Red Sox in 1960; quarterback John Elway winning the 1999 Super Bowl in his last game as a Denver Bronco. One of those notes was hit last week when Pete Sampras took his final bow on the stadium court at the U.S. Open tournament. Sampras first took center stage in the tennis world in 1990 when at age 19 he beat a much-more ballyhooed teen-ager, Andre Agassi, to win the U.S. Open.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 13, 2000
Wen Ho Lee 1, FBI 0. Cheer up. Any oil that OPEC witholds today will still be available tomorrow. Shsh. 10.3 million gallons of our sewage is missing. Don't tell and no one will find out. Now it can be told: Violence sells. There was Hoosier Madness before Bobby Knight, and will be long after. Pete Sampras is history!
SPORTS
September 7, 2002
Results, schedule Women's singles semifinals Venus Williams (2) def. Amelie Mauresmo (10), 6-3, 5-7, 6-4. Serena Williams (1) def. Lindsay Davenport (4), 6-3, 7-5. Today's matches Men's singles semifinals Day session Pete Sampras (17) vs. Sjeng Schalken (24) Lleyton Hewitt (1) vs. Andre Agassi (6) Women's singles championship Night sesson Serena Williams (1) vs. Venus Williams (2)
SPORTS
August 25, 1991
Event: The 111th U.S. Open Tennis Championships, the las of tennis' four grand slam events, begins tomorrow and ends with the men's singles title on Sept. 8.Surface: DecoTurf II (hardcourts).Seating capacity: Stadium: 19,987 seats; Grandstand: 6,000.Purse: $7,250,000, with $400,000 to each of the women's and men's champions.Field: 128 players in each of the men's and women's singles competition.Top seeds: Women: Steffi Graf, Germany; Men: Boris Becker, Germany.Defending champions: Women: Gabriela Sabatini, Argentina; Men: Pete Sampras, Bradenton, Fla.Former champions in field: Women: Martina Navratilova, Steffi Graf and Gabriela Sabatini.
SPORTS
By Lori Van Lonkhuyzen and Lori Van Lonkhuyzen,Sun Staff Writer | July 8, 1994
According to Andre Agassi, tennis needs a good old-fashioned, furious, down-and-dirty rivalry.So Agassi would have no qualms about starting one.His target? Pete Sampras. World No. 1 Pete Sampras. Wimbledon and U.S. Open champion Pete Sampras. The same Pete Sampras who will compete next week at the Legg Mason Tennis Classic with Agassi."I think that rivalry would be exciting," said Agassi, who spoke yesterday from Las Vegas in a video news conference to reporters in Washington and Los Angeles.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2002
NEW YORK - The criticism can stop now. Pete Sampras - who had dropped to the No. 17 seed, who had heard his play criticized, who had heard opposing players say he wasn't the player he used to be and should retire - that Pete Sampras won the U.S. Open yesterday. That Pete Sampras hit 84 winners. That Pete Sampras hit 33 aces. That Pete Sampras, 31, beat age-old foe Andre Agassi, 32, decisively, 6-3, 6-4, 5-7, 6-4. Then, in an uncharacteristic display of emotion, Sampras left the court to climb through the crowd at the USTA National Tennis Center, high-fiving fans, receiving pats on the back and congratulations all along the way, to reach his wife, Bridgette Wilson-Sampras, who is pregnant with their first child.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | July 10, 1995
WIMBLEDON, England -- They will miss Pete Sampras. They will recall the years when he owned Wimbledon, when he was the big, quiet bully of men's tennis, grinding his opponents into the grass and winning championships with quick-draw serves and penetrating volleys.Yesterday, he won his third straight Wimbledon title by stomping on Boris Becker's sentimental express, 6-7 (5-7), 6-2, 6-4, 6-2.When Sampras held the winner's trophy aloft, the crowd cheered politely. But when Becker made an impromptu lap of honor around Centre Court, the roars echoed in the old stadium.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2003
NEW YORK -- No. 15 seed Fernando Gonzalez looked around Arthur Ashe Stadium and sighed. It is hard enough to play and win a first-round match at the U.S. Open, let alone having to do in front of a crowd that is cheering wildly for Michael Chang, the sentimental favorite who, like Pete Sampras the night before, is retiring from the game. "It was tough when I was serving for the match," said Gonzalez, who stepped away from the service line once, waiting for the crowd to settle down. "I was feeling like he was trying to come back.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2003
NEW YORK - Pete Sampras controlled many opposing players during his career, but last night, the man so many said never showed emotion, could neither control his face nor hide the depth of his feelings. He came to Arthur Ashe Stadium at the U.S. Open to make his retirement official and say a final farewell. Before he could say a word, his face began to tremble and tears came. He raised a hand to brush them away. The smile returned when he saw a picture of his wife and son on the big overhead screen.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2003
NEW YORK - Pete Sampras, winner of a record 14 Grand Slam events, will make his retirement official tonight at the U.S. Open in a ceremony that honors his career. But Andy Roddick, the hottest player in men's tennis this summer, said he won't miss the big guy. "That's OK," said Roddick, 20, when asked about Sampras, who beat him in last year's Open quarterfinals en route to his final Grand Slam title. "That's just one less player that's a threat." For the first time in 32 years at the Open - when Ken Rosewall and Margaret Court were absent - neither the men's nor women's champion will attempt to defend a title.
SPORTS
By Lisa Dillman and Lisa Dillman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2003
WIMBLEDON, England - You would expect the line - or the queue, as they say around here - of willing-and-able coaches to stretch into the distance when word went out that 20-year-old Andy Roddick was searching for a replacement after recently parting with Tarik Benhabiles. So, Roddick called the home of the guy at the top of the list. And promptly heard the dial tone. They always say rejection is only a phone call away. Kidding aside, the 6-year-old daughter of Brad Gilbert does what kids often do when they pick up the phone and Mom or Dad isn't home.
SPORTS
By Bill Dwyre and Bill Dwyre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Pete Sampras, whose status as a tennis legend is best represented by his record 14 major titles, has likely played his last competitive match. Through his coach, Paul Annacone, Sampras withdrew yesterday from three tournaments that were holding entry spots for him. One was Wimbledon. "Yes, for me not to be at Wimbledon, I guess that's big," Sampras said from his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. Seven of Sampras' 14 Grand Slam event titles came on the grass of Wimbledon, where, in 2000, he beat Australian Patrick Rafter in the final.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | September 9, 2002
NEW YORK - These are times when familiar things, rituals, are in order, particularly here, where, over the next three painful days, the anniversary of Sept. 11 will be commemorated. The U.S. Open's grand finale supplied a small, comforting dose. After all, what could be more familiar than the sight of Pete Sampras, 31, ambling slump-shouldered across center court? What could be more familiar than Sampras gunning 129-mph aces into the green concrete, dropping delicate touch volleys over the net for whisper winners or slicing that lethal, one-hand backhand crosscourt, into the night, out of reach?
SPORTS
March 6, 1992
INDIAN WELLS, Calif. -- Unseeded Andre Chesnokov of Russia surprised Jim Courier, the world's top-ranked player, in straight sets yesterday at the Champions Cup.Three other seeded Americans, including No. 2 seed Pete Sampras, also were bounced from the tournament in third-round matches.Courier, the event's defending champion and top seed, lost, 6-4, 7-5, to Chesnokov. Courier hurt himself with a number of errors off his forehand in the match at Hyatt Grand Champions resort. Chesnokov, ranked 36th internationally, put together a balanced, all-court game.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | September 20, 1994
For John McEnroe, Vitas Gerulaitis was "an inspiration," a kid from the old neighborhood who conquered the big time, a kid he "looked up to."To Pete Sampras, who has found life lonely at the top, he became a best friend in a business where competition often prohibits friendship.With his rival Bjorn Borg, he shared his home and backyard tennis court each year at U.S. Open time and was, Borg said yesterday, "like a brother to me."In the eyes of Fred Stolle, he was a second son, and to Jimmy Connors, who played doubles with him at a Seattle exhibition just last Wednesday, he was a show-stopper and a perfectionist who had come to be as obsessed about his golf swing as he once had been about his serve.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2002
NEW YORK - The criticism can stop now. Pete Sampras - who had dropped to the No. 17 seed, who had heard his play criticized, who had heard opposing players say he wasn't the player he used to be and should retire - that Pete Sampras won the U.S. Open yesterday. That Pete Sampras hit 84 winners. That Pete Sampras hit 33 aces. That Pete Sampras, 31, beat age-old foe Andre Agassi, 32, decisively, 6-3, 6-4, 5-7, 6-4. Then, in an uncharacteristic display of emotion, Sampras left the court to climb through the crowd at the USTA National Tennis Center, high-fiving fans, receiving pats on the back and congratulations all along the way, to reach his wife, Bridgette Wilson-Sampras, who is pregnant with their first child.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | September 8, 2002
NEW YORK - Look what tennis pulled out of its duffel bag: Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras, together again. A showdown between two old friends and rivals that serves up nostalgia and anticipation as well as anything under the bright lights of Broadway. Maybe better than Broadway, since this two-man revival is playing in Queens, a louder borough where tennis fans live to show love for the old guys, particularly Americans who refuse to go gently into that good night. Just ask Jimmy Connors.
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