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By John Steadman | January 7, 1991
Inmate 01832061 will turn in his khaki uniform, be processed for discharge and leave the federal prison camp at Marion, Ill., for a walk into a world that still wants to debase and demean him. Pete Rose, ordinarily, would be a free man, ready for a new beginning. But he carries a burden. There are those with hearts ** of stone unwilling to forgive and forget.They obviously don't believe in giving a man with self-inflicted pain another chance. Nor do they take stock of the passage from the Bible that reminds us: "He that is without sin among you, let him cast the first stone."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | July 13, 2011
Like, gag us with a spoon. For its 30th anniversary, Artscape is going all 1980s on us. So we figured that now’s the time to determine once and for all which was the better 10-year period: the ’80s or ’90s. Let the battle begin! FASHION ’80s: Neon; torn sweat shirts and leg warmers; the “Miami Vice” look; shoulder pads; goth ’90s: Grunge; “Blossom” hats; bell-bottom sleeves; cargo shorts/pants; babydoll dresses; that T-shirt-under-a-suit thing Winner : Tough one, but the ’ 80s ekes out a win (mostly thanks to not introducing cargo shorts/pants)
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SPORTS
May 31, 1991
Pete Rose is going to play Ty Cobb in a made-for-TV movie titled "The Babe Ruth Story.""It's something that just came in out of the blue," said Cal Levy, the partner at Hamilton Projects in Cincinnati who handles Rose. "It's not a huge role or anything, so they must have figured they didn't need a name actor to play the part."And you have to admit," he added, "it is a nice twist on things."Rose broke Cobb's career-hit record when he got No. 4,192 in September 1985.Rose, who has been banned from baseball after being accused of betting on games, could not be reached for comment about the movie.
SPORTS
By Ben Bolch and Kevin Van Valkenburg, Tribune Newspapers | July 4, 2011
He is Mr. November, and every other month in which Major League Baseball is played. He has more hits than Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, a higher career batting average than Mickey Mantle and a higher postseason average than Joe DiMaggio. And it won't be long before Derek Jeter is a new lord of New York Yankees lore. With six more hits, the shortstop will become the first player to collect 3,000 hits while playing exclusively with the most storied franchise in baseball. He resumed his pursuit Monday against the Cleveland Indians after spending the last three weeks on the disabled list with a strained right calf.
SPORTS
By Stan Hochman and Stan Hochman,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | June 30, 1991
Pete Rose said, "I guess I should say it's nice to be back in a ballpark" when he was introduced in Reading, Pa., a surprise guest on a night honoring Mike Schmidt.Commissioner Fay Vincent apparently didn't think it was so nice. Wednesday, he decided it wasn't so naughty, either.Did Vincent cave in, hearing the winds of indignation? Did he check out the tiny print in the agreement Rose and ex-commissioner Bart Giamatti signed, the one written in sand?What can a former big-leaguer on permanent suspension do?
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2004
Major league great Pete Rose finally has admitted that he bet on baseball games while he was the manager of the Cincinnati Reds in the 1980s, but it is unclear whether his long-awaited act of public contrition will persuade baseball commissioner Bud Selig to lift the lifetime ban imposed on the sport's all-time hits leader in 1989. Rose revealed in a television interview that will air this week what he has steadfastly denied for the past 14 years. He told ABC Primetime interviewer Charles Gibson that he gambled on baseball, but insisted he never bet against his team and never let a wager affect an on-field decision.
FEATURES
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2004
For 14 years, Pete Rose stared into the cameras and vowed he'd never bet on baseball, believing, presumably, that his passionate denials would protect his image and help him to ultimately secure a place in baseball's Hall of Fame. Having failed in both those pursuits, Rose now admits it's all been a big lie. He did, in fact, bet on baseball, the game's cardinal sin. Rose did so not just once or twice, if that would actually matter. He put money down four or five times a week while managing the Cincinnati Reds, according to excerpts from his autobiography released to Sports Illustrated magazine.
SPORTS
February 10, 2006
Good morning --Pete Rose -- What's that? You're wondering if we have Rick Tocchet's phone number?
SPORTS
November 17, 2007
Good morning -- Barry Bonds -- Will you and Pete Rose be talking about your records outside the Hall of Fame?
SPORTS
June 6, 2004
It's a fact Daryle Ward of the Pirates, who hit for the cycle last month, and father Gary are only father-son pair to do it. Milestone Ichiro Suzuki of the Mariners became the first player since Pete Rose to have two career 50-plus-hit months. The number 41: home runs the White Sox have hit in their 27 home games.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,peter.schmuck@baltsun.com | July 31, 2009
News item: : The New York Times reported Thursday that Manny Ramirez and David Ortiz tested positive for illegal performance-enhancing drugs during Major League Baseball's supposedly anonymous survey testing in 2003, according to lawyers familiar with the results. My take: : OK, enough's enough. I know there is no way that MLB and the players union can justify outing the remaining 100 or so players who tested positive during the 2003 survey, but I think everybody has figured out by now that would be much better than having a couple of names leak out every six months, keeping the sport mired indefinitely in the six-year-old fallout from this tawdry scandal.
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | February 23, 2009
Prime 9 9:30 p.m. [MLB Network] It's a look at the all-time list of eligible players who aren't in the Hall of Fame. Because this is for those "eligible," Pete Rose might not get a mention, but the list should include Mark McGwire and Bert Blyleven (left). And Blyleven must be thrilled to be in such company.
SPORTS
May 14, 2008
Soon-to-be Hall of Famer Goose Gossage called out New York Yankees reliever Joba Chamberlain for Chamberlain's exuberance after big strikeouts - the most recent example a primal scream and fist pump after striking out the Cleveland Indians' David Dellucci last week. Just two days earlier, Dellucci hit a three-run homer off Chamberlain, so it was a turnabout moment. Chamberlain said he wasn't trying to show up Dellucci. He made sure to look into his own dugout, not at the batter. But Gossage contends that Chamberlain ought to be more reserved, especially because he wears Yankees pinstripes.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | December 20, 2007
Pete Rose was scheduled to weigh in on the Mitchell Report on the Dennis Miller TV sports talker on Versus last night and, according to previews of the show, Rose made these points: Steroid use, if true, has made a "mockery" of baseball and in comparison, the scandal makes him look like an "altar boy." That if steroid users make it to Cooperstown, then Rose thinks he has "got to get a shot somewhere." And that if steroid usage were common in his era, Rose believes he would have gotten 5,000 hits.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | December 19, 2007
Confession, someone said, is good for the soul. Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts felt obliged to confess to his steroids use, but as confessions go, Roberts' admission was small potatoes. Here's some real big-league confessing from sports figures to presidents to philosophers. Clifford Irving In 1971, a big-time book publisher announced with great fanfare that a new work was forthcoming on reclusive bazillionaire Howard Hughes to be written by author Clifford Irving. There was just one problem.
SPORTS
November 17, 2007
Good morning -- Barry Bonds -- Will you and Pete Rose be talking about your records outside the Hall of Fame?
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | February 23, 2009
Prime 9 9:30 p.m. [MLB Network] It's a look at the all-time list of eligible players who aren't in the Hall of Fame. Because this is for those "eligible," Pete Rose might not get a mention, but the list should include Mark McGwire and Bert Blyleven (left). And Blyleven must be thrilled to be in such company.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 2, 1996
The Orioles sit down Alomar and Cleveland sits Belle. Deal?Robbie traduced the legacy of sportsmanship exemplified by such mature folk as Ty Cobb, Ted Williams, Babe Ruth, Pete Rose, Earl Weaver and Albert Belle.You might think that if baseball had a real commissioner, none of this would have happened and people would behave. Hah!Odd. Brady does not look 50.Pub Date: 10/02/96
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | December 7, 2006
Despite years of getting a steady diet of "nonjudgmental" attitudes from our educational system and the media, we have not yet lost all sense of right and wrong. Our elites may have, which might explain how anyone could have thought that O.J. Simpson's book about the murder of his ex-wife and her friend would be accepted by the public. Apparently the clever people who put this deal together thought that a few glib words would defuse any serious objections, and perhaps the few voices of outrage would be just enough to create more free publicity for the book.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | December 3, 2006
Brooks Robinson is expecting a record crowd to converge on Cooperstown, N.Y., in July to watch Cal Ripken Jr. join the game's immortals in the Hall of Fame. "They'll break the all-time record with attendance at this one," Robinson said. "When I was inducted in '83, the whole state got behind it. We wowed them up there. They ran out of hats, shirts, everything. I think they'll be prepared for this one." Robinson will be there, of course, along with about 50 other past inductees. And thousands of fans from Maryland and beyond will surely make the trek.
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