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By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
A moment as mysterious as the sacred idea it celebrates - the crucified Christ's decent into Hades before his resurrection - arrived Saturday morning at St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church in a cascade of rose petals and a cacophony of bells, hands drumming on wood pews and a church elder chanting in his ancestral tongue. It was a rich, even raucous moment affirming belief in Christ's conquest of evil and heralding the arrival of the church's most significant holiday. This year, the Eastern Orthodox Church - the faith of an estimated 300 million people from the United States through Eastern Europe and the Middle East - celebrates Easter a month after the Western Christian observance, capping 40 days of fasting and a week of services marking different stages of the paschal narrative.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
A moment as mysterious as the sacred idea it celebrates - the crucified Christ's decent into Hades before his resurrection - arrived Saturday morning at St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church in a cascade of rose petals and a cacophony of bells, hands drumming on wood pews and a church elder chanting in his ancestral tongue. It was a rich, even raucous moment affirming belief in Christ's conquest of evil and heralding the arrival of the church's most significant holiday. This year, the Eastern Orthodox Church - the faith of an estimated 300 million people from the United States through Eastern Europe and the Middle East - celebrates Easter a month after the Western Christian observance, capping 40 days of fasting and a week of services marking different stages of the paschal narrative.
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NEWS
June 4, 1998
The Hollyberry Garden Club of Severna Park has been awarded $250 for its PETALS (Protect the Environment Through Action, Learning and Service) program.The club, along with the Friends of the B&A Trail, is turning Hatton-Register Green into a garden of plants, trees, paths, flowers, grasses and a water display. Benches will also be added.The money is part of a $1,000 grant to Maryland Garden Clubs from the National Council of State Garden Clubs and Shell Oil Co. The council distributed $106,575 to 340 clubs nationwide.
EXPLORE
By Kate V. Jones | December 9, 2011
Evelyn Beall, owner of Flowers by Evelyn, in Westminster, has a personal stake in comforting those who are fighting cancer. She's a cancer survivor herself, and said her mother-in-law is currently undergoing cancer treatments at the Carroll Regional Cancer Center, part of Carroll Hospital Center in Westminster. "There are very good people out there (at the center)," Beall said, "and she loves them. " Beall is one of four local florists in Westminster who are brightening the spirits of cancer patients by making and donating floral centerpieces to Carroll Regional Cancer Center's chemotherapy room.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie | May 12, 1996
It's flower power with a beautiful purpose: to transform dishes as simple as pizza and french toast or as complex as grilled salmon and homemade ice cream into glorious treats for the eye as well as the palate.Edible flowers give food fresh tastes -- ranging from sweet to peppery -- crisp texture and dramatic color.The edible flower phenomenon has been creeping eastward from California, where widespread organic farming and innovative chefs have been bringing flowers to the table on plates as well as in vases for the past few years.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 2001
Spring flowers are blooming, bringing a rainbow of colors to brighten your home. But the tulips, lilacs and pansies now in season can be more than a bouquet for your table; they can bring new tastes to your plate. If you think only goats and bunnies eat flowers, you're wrong. In fact, you've probably eaten some flowers already. Artichokes and broccoli are immature flowers, and many herbal teas contain rose petals, hibiscus, mint, chamomile and other flowers, says Cathy Wilkinson Barash, author of "Edible Flowers, From Garden to Palate" (Fulcrum Publishing, 1995, $24.95)
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | July 25, 2004
Echinacea, a North American native perennial, has long been a medicinal herb. Plains Indian tribes used the roots and rhizomes of Echinacea angustifolia, and today many of us swear by Echinacea tea or tablets to ward off colds and strengthen immune systems. But while the benefits of Echinacea, or purple coneflower, are near-legendary, there's another reason to grow the plant: It's gorgeous. With big, daisy-like petals spoked around a bulbous hub of gold-tipped bronze quills, it adds a beautiful wildflower look to the perennial beds.
FEATURES
By KEN FUSON and KEN FUSON,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1999
Not good. Not good at all.Betty Smith bends over. She examines some daffodils. They look fine -- even pretty -- but not to her expert eye."There's no use fooling with those," she says.On Sunday, just three days before the opening of the annual Maryland Daffodil Show, hail and high winds struck Smith's home in Baltimore County.The 84-year-old Smith is the grande dame of Maryland daffodil growers. She can identify many of the myriad varieties. She has judged daffodil shows in several states.
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | June 27, 1992
For rose enthusiasts, next spring will see four new All-America Rose Selections winners at nurseries and garden centers.Flashiest of the quartet is Rio Samba, a hybrid tea with a bright yellow center and orange outer petals. It was hybridized for Jackson & Perkins by the late William A. Warriner, who developed 20 All-America Rose Selections winners in his lifetime, including another of the 1993 choices, Sweet Inspiration. It's a floribunda with exceptional compact, dense form and pink flowers that resemble an elegant tea rose.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | November 13, 1994
New crafts magazine debuts in BaltimoreA glossy new magazine for collectors of contemporary crafts premieres this month. AmericanStyle, published in Baltimore, features trends, profiles, events calendars and gallery listings for anyone interested in fine crafts. The magazine will come out twice a year; you can buy the fall/winter issue at bookstores and craft galleries for $7.For old-house fansIf you're working on an old house, this is a not-to-be-missed event: the Maryland Association of Historic District Commissions holding a Renovator's Roundtable Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2011
Sorry, Gertrude Stein, but you got it wrong with "Rose is a rose is a rose is a rose. " The flower has a whole new identity: out of the bud vase and onto the plate. Long used in Persian and Indian cooking, rose is a flavor not commonly found in American fare. But some creative local chefs and bakers are working it into desserts, drinks, even savory dishes. Rose syrups, rose water and petals fresh, frozen and dried lend a surprising floral note to fruit-topped pastries and chocolate eclairs, strawberry mojitos and a couscous served with lamb.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | April 6, 2008
In the opening pages of her memoir, The Florist's Daughter, Patricia Hampl sits determinedly by a hospital bed, holding her mother's unconscious hand while writing the obituary of this difficult woman with her other hand. Refusing to sleep and to acknowledge that one day has passed into another -- "we won't reach today until this is over, the time warp we entered three days ago" -- she waits for her "daughterdom" to end. The death of the mother will be the death of the daughter, too. When this is over, she will be something completely different.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 1, 2007
An exquisite rose and three carnations by the 17th-century English still-life painter Alexander Marshal. A charming floral study by Delacroix. Cezanne's luminous watercolor image of geraniums. These are not the sort of paintings museum-goers are likely to associate with Robert and Jane Meyerhoff, the Baltimore philanthropists renowned for their superb collection of postwar American art. FLORAL STILL LIFES / / Through June 10 / / Walters Art Museum / / 410-547-9000
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 19, 2006
Our Early Girl tomatoes look fine, but when we cut into the fruit, one or more cavities is black. This is an unusual manifestation of blossom end rot. The cause is insufficient calcium taken up by the plant, usually due to insufficient or inconsistent watering. This is usually an early-season malady that goes away as the season progresses. Make sure your plants are well watered and, for a quick fix, use a calcium chloride spray product. Next spring, put a handful of lime or gypsum in the planting hole.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2005
Watch a bunchberry open its petals next month - if you can. Scientists who videotaped the explosive blooming of the little-known flower say it's the fastest motion ever recorded in a plant - action that will be on display in Maryland and much of the rest of the United States in the coming weeks. Cornus canadensis, as it's known scientifically, opens its petals in less than a thousandth of a second and shoots pollen into the air with the force of a rocket launcher. "It really is pretty cool," said Joan Edwards, a biologist at Williams College in Williamstown, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 10, 2004
From a distance, it looks like a huge metal flower, or perhaps an elegantly tied silver ribbon. But step beneath Danish artist Olafur Eliasson's 14-foot-high, stainless steel sculpture and the space above is transformed into a brilliant night sky filled with twinkling points of light. The light streams through tiny apertures formed where the sculpture's steel "petals" join one another just above the viewer's head. But because the petals have mirrored surfaces, one can't tell how far away the lights are -- or if they're real.
FEATURES
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 5, 1998
Just look at those flowers: 10 feet tall, their petals golden yellow, the centers filled with enough seeds for a real bird feast.Or half that size, with velvety petals. Wine red.Or even shorter, blooms so packed with fluffy petals you might mistake then for chrysanthemums.Sunflowers all, and you wouldn't believe how much they've changed in the past few years. Even Van Gogh might not recognize the new cousins of the golden-yellow sunflowers he painted with such drama.Flower breeders came up with sunflowers pale as lemon sherbet, white as cream and red as Burgundy wine.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 19, 2006
Our Early Girl tomatoes look fine, but when we cut into the fruit, one or more cavities is black. This is an unusual manifestation of blossom end rot. The cause is insufficient calcium taken up by the plant, usually due to insufficient or inconsistent watering. This is usually an early-season malady that goes away as the season progresses. Make sure your plants are well watered and, for a quick fix, use a calcium chloride spray product. Next spring, put a handful of lime or gypsum in the planting hole.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | July 25, 2004
Echinacea, a North American native perennial, has long been a medicinal herb. Plains Indian tribes used the roots and rhizomes of Echinacea angustifolia, and today many of us swear by Echinacea tea or tablets to ward off colds and strengthen immune systems. But while the benefits of Echinacea, or purple coneflower, are near-legendary, there's another reason to grow the plant: It's gorgeous. With big, daisy-like petals spoked around a bulbous hub of gold-tipped bronze quills, it adds a beautiful wildflower look to the perennial beds.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 2003
Trendy is not the first word that springs to mind when you mention bulbs. Yet, flowering bulbs go in and out of fashion just as miniskirts and platform shoes do. For example, streak-petaled Rembrandt tulips were the hottest new thing in the early 1600s. Tastemakers paid the equivalent of thousands of dollars for a single bulb. They now cost about $1 each. Though the cost of flowering bulbs has gone way down and the number of varieties way up, the yen for the newest / hippest thing is unchanged.
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