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Pet Monkey

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NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1999
A Glen Burnie couple's seven-month battle to regain custody of a pet monkey with a penchant for biting humans has reached the Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals, where testimony Tuesday night led to angry shouting at a witness by one of the owners.In a 2 1/2-hour hearing, the county's animal-control administrator defended the seizure of Jamie, a male Bonnett macaque, from owners Steven and Kimberly Ritterspach in April after he bit a woman on her lip at a local tavern and touched off a brawl.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | September 26, 2004
There she is, a snazzy Baltimore pinup girl, circa 1940s or early 1950s. Her dark hair is swept up and she wears sunglasses that complement her smile. Her bathing suit, modest by current standards, nevertheless celebrates a lean, well-proportioned physique. Who is she? For Bethany Obrecht, she is a clue in a photographic mystery set in East Baltimore, one that she would love to solve. Last March, when her mother's boyfriend returned home from Stoner's Auction in Glen Rock, Pa. with a box lot of assorted stuff, Obrecht pored through its contents.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
Jamie won't be home for Christmas -- or maybe not ever again.The male macaque, blamed for inflicting minor injuries on several people and igniting a barroom brawl, will not be returned to his Glen Burnie owners, the Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals has decided.But the owners, Steven and Kimberly Ritterspach, vowed yesterday to challenge the ruling in Circuit Court."I won't let this end," said Steven Ritterspach, noting that he has spent $20,000 on efforts to regain custody of the pet monkey that was seized and relocated by Anne Arundel animal control officials to a wildlife refuge in Howard County.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
Jamie won't be home for Christmas -- or maybe not ever again.The male macaque, blamed for inflicting minor injuries on several people and igniting a barroom brawl, will not be returned to his Glen Burnie owners, the Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals has decided.But the owners, Steven and Kimberly Ritterspach, vowed yesterday to challenge the ruling in Circuit Court."I won't let this end," said Steven Ritterspach, noting that he has spent $20,000 on efforts to regain custody of the pet monkey that was seized and relocated by Anne Arundel animal control officials to a wildlife refuge in Howard County.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1999
A pet monkey accused of biting or scratching more than a half-dozen people over two years will have to remain at the Howard County refuge where it has been since spring.After hearing seven hours of testimony yesterday, the Anne Arundel County Animal Control Commission, a seven-member administrative review panel, decided that animal control officers were right to take Jamie, a 2-year-old Bonnett macaque, from owners Steven and Kimberly Ritterspach of Glen Burnie after the animal was involved in a barroom brawl in April.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | September 26, 2004
There she is, a snazzy Baltimore pinup girl, circa 1940s or early 1950s. Her dark hair is swept up and she wears sunglasses that complement her smile. Her bathing suit, modest by current standards, nevertheless celebrates a lean, well-proportioned physique. Who is she? For Bethany Obrecht, she is a clue in a photographic mystery set in East Baltimore, one that she would love to solve. Last March, when her mother's boyfriend returned home from Stoner's Auction in Glen Rock, Pa. with a box lot of assorted stuff, Obrecht pored through its contents.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1995
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- Alla Matveyeva takes such delight in her own enthusiasms (and she has a bushelful of them) that her life seems to be a constant forward tumble, which leaves her colleagues at the House of Culture for Communications Workers rolling their eyes in exasperation.There was a time when a House of Culture in this part of the world was a serious and sober institution, dedicated to the artistic and musical uplift of the proletariat.And now here comes Mrs. Matveyeva talking about psychic therapy and yoga and reaching out to children of drug addicts -- and then there's that monkey.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
Cornelia Redmond-Chavez's stage presence as a background singer for Bo Diddley thrilled audiences worldwide. She had a hip sassiness that kept the show's star in his place. And her booming singing voice seemed destined for higher goals.A small, attractive woman with a charming and energetic personality, Mrs. Chavez performed with the rock 'n' roll legend for 25 years. On Sunday , the 50-year-old Randallstown resident died of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital.Under the stage name "Cookie V," Mrs. Chavez traveled the world with Bo Diddley.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | August 3, 2007
Robin Morrison grabs the leashes from a hook in the shed. She calls out to Nanny and Samuel, who are lounging in the shade on the back porch: "Come on, you two. It's time for a walk." At first glance, Morrison might look like a typical pet owner taking a dog for a stroll through her Baltimore County neighborhood. But passing motorists sometimes stop, she says, when they realize she's leading a pair of goats down the suburban street. "I know, I know, my daughter said the same thing: `Mom?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1995
A movie that changed my life, a chance to chart the career of Courteney Cox, ice-skating nannies and a lifetime achievement award for Mr. Rourke of "Fantasy Island." For the week between Christmas and New Year's, a week that's usually the deadest of the year, this isn't a bad lineup at all.* "Disney's Hits on Ice" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Katarina Witt as Mary Poppins? I knew Great Britain's most famous nanny could fly, but ice skate? Now that's talent. CBS.* "Friends" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1999
A Glen Burnie couple's seven-month battle to regain custody of a pet monkey with a penchant for biting humans has reached the Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals, where testimony Tuesday night led to angry shouting at a witness by one of the owners.In a 2 1/2-hour hearing, the county's animal-control administrator defended the seizure of Jamie, a male Bonnett macaque, from owners Steven and Kimberly Ritterspach in April after he bit a woman on her lip at a local tavern and touched off a brawl.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1999
A pet monkey accused of biting or scratching more than a half-dozen people over two years will have to remain at the Howard County refuge where it has been since spring.After hearing seven hours of testimony yesterday, the Anne Arundel County Animal Control Commission, a seven-member administrative review panel, decided that animal control officers were right to take Jamie, a 2-year-old Bonnett macaque, from owners Steven and Kimberly Ritterspach of Glen Burnie after the animal was involved in a barroom brawl in April.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1995
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- Alla Matveyeva takes such delight in her own enthusiasms (and she has a bushelful of them) that her life seems to be a constant forward tumble, which leaves her colleagues at the House of Culture for Communications Workers rolling their eyes in exasperation.There was a time when a House of Culture in this part of the world was a serious and sober institution, dedicated to the artistic and musical uplift of the proletariat.And now here comes Mrs. Matveyeva talking about psychic therapy and yoga and reaching out to children of drug addicts -- and then there's that monkey.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 13, 1999
They say Portuguese soap works best on the skin, but for tear-duct rinsing, Chinese soap may be the winner, at least the brand purveyed in "The King of Masks."A melodrama set in 1930s China about a street performer (Zhu Xu) who longs to pass on his gift for magically changing masks to a grandson, "The King of Masks" is a well-filmed portrait of Chinese provincial life, as well as that country's traditions of filial piety and heartless sexism. If filmgoers don't mind being manipulated by lots of heart-rending scenes with impossibly sweet-looking waifs, as well as the sight of Zhu's own elderly, gap-toothed visage, they will be drawn in by this affecting glimpse of a country and an era gone by.When the itinerant performer Bian Lian Wang (Zhu)
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