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By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1998
Many of the thousands of veterinarians at the annual American Veterinary Medical Association convention this week in Baltimore are convening to talk about, among other things, their survival.The nation's veterinarians, the majority of whom are small-business owners, operate in a high-cost business that requires them to do everything from providing care to staying up to date on medical advances to collecting payments.The consolidation trend that has swept the human health care industry has barely touched veterinary medicine, with the result that most of the 43,000 veterinarians in private practice work on their own or with one or two others.
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By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Vacation means warm beaches, breezy campgrounds, posh spas - a break from daily stress and a great way to unwind and leave our cares behind. Unless you have a pet. Fido or Fluffy, beloved as they are, can throw a wrench into the best-laid vacation plans. Few of us want to leave our pets in a traditional kennel's cages for days or weeks at a time, and traveling with them can be difficult, if not impossible. But that's changing as more people are taking pets with them or finding what's been deemed "luxury boarding," which turns the traditional kennel on its ear with accommodations that mimic home or even a fancy hotel for humans.
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BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 8, 2002
Fido has a fever, and the veterinarian wants to conduct a spate of expensive diagnostic tests. What's a pet lover to do? Tap the dog's health insurance policy, of course. Thousands of animal owners have turned to pet insurance in recent years to cover their critters' unexpected ailments. And the service is so popular that some U.S. companies offer discounted pet insurance as a "voluntary benefit" to their employees. Dallas-based Blockbuster, for example, made pet insurance available to its workers last year - along with policies that cover their cars, homes and long-term care.
BUSINESS
By David Colker and David Colker,Los Angeles Times | July 13, 2008
Veterinarian Gregory Hammer laughed as he recalled the average price his clients paid for an office visit in 1973, when he started in rural Kansas. "It was $6," said Hammer, now president of the American Veterinary Medical Association. Good luck getting so much as a torn nail clipped for that these days. Americans spent more than $10 billion on veterinary care last year, according to the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association. A single visit to a vet cost an average of $135 for a dog owner as of 2006, the last time the veterinary group took a survey of those costs.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Vacation means warm beaches, breezy campgrounds, posh spas - a break from daily stress and a great way to unwind and leave our cares behind. Unless you have a pet. Fido or Fluffy, beloved as they are, can throw a wrench into the best-laid vacation plans. Few of us want to leave our pets in a traditional kennel's cages for days or weeks at a time, and traveling with them can be difficult, if not impossible. But that's changing as more people are taking pets with them or finding what's been deemed "luxury boarding," which turns the traditional kennel on its ear with accommodations that mimic home or even a fancy hotel for humans.
BUSINESS
By David Colker and David Colker,Los Angeles Times | July 13, 2008
Veterinarian Gregory Hammer laughed as he recalled the average price his clients paid for an office visit in 1973, when he started in rural Kansas. "It was $6," said Hammer, now president of the American Veterinary Medical Association. Good luck getting so much as a torn nail clipped for that these days. Americans spent more than $10 billion on veterinary care last year, according to the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association. A single visit to a vet cost an average of $135 for a dog owner as of 2006, the last time the veterinary group took a survey of those costs.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,MORNING CALL IN ALLENTOWN PA | August 26, 2007
A pacemaker and cancer radiation treatments for your dog? An MRI and kidney transplant for your cat? These are the types of medical procedures available for our furry friends. As medical technology advances for pets, so do costs. They can run into the thousands of dollars. As a result, the topic of pet health insurance regularly crops up. With pet insurance you pay a monthly premium, and the insurer will reimburse you for eligible medical expenses related to accident or illness. Americans will spend nearly $41 billion on their pets this year, according to the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | April 25, 1992
The nation has a new top dog -- the Labrador retriever.Based on 1991 registration figures, the American Kennel Club's annual ranking of breeds showed America's favorite retrievers pushing cocker spaniels into second place, out of the top spot they'd held for a decade.Poodles were the third-most-popular breed, unchanged since the previous year. The rest of the top 10 (with their earlier ranking in parentheses): 4) Rottweilers (5); 5) German shepherds (6); 6) golden retrievers (4); 7) beagles (9)
NEWS
By Katie Menzer and Katie Menzer,[McClatchy-Tribune] | September 30, 2007
Fat cats are more common than you think. Husky huskies are, too. Researchers say that about a quarter of all household pets are overweight and that the animal epidemic follows the obesity increase found in humans nationwide. Obesity rates for humans rose in 31 states last year, according to a recently released study by the nonprofit Trust for America's Health. And some scientists say things are no better for your pet. "There's common agreement that obesity in pets is more of a problem than ever," said Donald C. Beitz, a professor of nutritional biochemistry at Iowa State University and chairman of a former subcommittee on dog and cat nutrition for the National Academies' National Research Council.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2012
Damn you, "Twilight. " Thanks to the ever-popular movie -- or at least so I suspect -- the most popular name for dogs and cats in America for 2011 is.... Bella. According to Veterinary Pet Insurance Co., although Bella has dominated the dog-name list since 2009, for the first time last year, it shot to the top of the kitty list as well. Is everyone getting a new pet a Tween or what? Rounding out the top 5 most popular names for dogs last year was Bailey, Max, Lucy and Molly.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,MORNING CALL IN ALLENTOWN PA | August 26, 2007
A pacemaker and cancer radiation treatments for your dog? An MRI and kidney transplant for your cat? These are the types of medical procedures available for our furry friends. As medical technology advances for pets, so do costs. They can run into the thousands of dollars. As a result, the topic of pet health insurance regularly crops up. With pet insurance you pay a monthly premium, and the insurer will reimburse you for eligible medical expenses related to accident or illness. Americans will spend nearly $41 billion on their pets this year, according to the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 8, 2002
Fido has a fever, and the veterinarian wants to conduct a spate of expensive diagnostic tests. What's a pet lover to do? Tap the dog's health insurance policy, of course. Thousands of animal owners have turned to pet insurance in recent years to cover their critters' unexpected ailments. And the service is so popular that some U.S. companies offer discounted pet insurance as a "voluntary benefit" to their employees. Dallas-based Blockbuster, for example, made pet insurance available to its workers last year - along with policies that cover their cars, homes and long-term care.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1998
Many of the thousands of veterinarians at the annual American Veterinary Medical Association convention this week in Baltimore are convening to talk about, among other things, their survival.The nation's veterinarians, the majority of whom are small-business owners, operate in a high-cost business that requires them to do everything from providing care to staying up to date on medical advances to collecting payments.The consolidation trend that has swept the human health care industry has barely touched veterinary medicine, with the result that most of the 43,000 veterinarians in private practice work on their own or with one or two others.
NEWS
By Sara Casey Newman and Sara Casey Newman,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 11, 2002
In the dog and cat name game, Max and Tiger take the prize. That's according to a nationwide survey of 1,500 pet owners conducted recently by the Iams Co. However, when Veterinary Pet Insurance recently tallied up the pet names in its database of more than 220,000 policyholders, Max shared top honors with Mollie, not Tiger. Blame the difference on polling strategies. But credit them for a few other trendy tidbits. For example, the Iams survey found that: * Midwesterners are twice as likely as Northeasterners to name their dogs after foods or beverages.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez and For The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
What's in a name? According to the records of Veterinary Pet Insurance, Inc. (VPI), quite a lot, and the top dog and cat names for 2012 reveal some interesting tidbits about pet owners. VPI recently sorted their database of more than 485,000 pet names by popularity. The biggest trend they saw was that the top five cat and dog names were also top on Babycenter.com's list of 100 most popular baby names of the year. At the same time, traditional dog names -- think Fido or Fuffy -- trended toward the bottom of the list or slid off completely.
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