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By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
Owners of pet cemeteries in Baltimore County will have to notify customers of plans to sell or lease their graveyards for development under legislation passed Monday by the County Council. The legislation sponsored by Councilman David Marks, a Perry Hall Republican, was spurred by complaints about the Oakleigh Pet Cemetery in Parkville, which has faced numerous code-enforcement fines. Some believe the cemetery could be sold for development. Under the legislation, pet cemetery owners will have to publish a notice in a general-circulation newspaper of plans to develop a cemetery for any other purpose, and give written notice to every plot owner.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Carolyn Jacobi's broad-brimmed hat and cape stood out bright red against a gray afternoon recently at Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge, a combined pet and human cemetery, the latest stop in her 18-year national crusade for the buried dead and their loved ones. In a voice ringing with a preacher's passion, she told some three dozen people protesting possible development that she would fight to protect cemeteries "as long as God puts breath in my body, as long as I have a brain.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
At the Oakleigh Pet Cemetery in Parkville, Bobby the Wonder Monkey's tombstone is hidden in ivy. Weeds surround the grave of Monsetta, remembered as "Our only girl. " And on Snookie's stone marker, the epitaph "Until the end our faithful pal" is barely visible behind the brush. The owner of the 2.5-acre cemetery near Loch Raven Boulevard says he is trying to clean up, but he has racked up nearly $30,000 in unpaid county fines and fees for persistent problems such as overgrown vegetation, junk scattered on the grounds and broken windows.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Advocates for Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge have lost the battle over development rights there, but they say the war is not over. They plan to hold a rally at 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13, at the 78-year-old cemetery on U.S. 1 to draw attention to their argument that graves of pets and people there should not be disturbed. "The whole point of the rally is to bring attention to the plight of the cemetery," said Candy Warden, president of the Rosa Bonheur Society. The volunteer group takes care of the nearly 8-acre grounds, resting place for the remains of some 28 people and thousands of animals, including a few four-legged celebrities, including the Baltimore zoo's first elephant and mascot dogs for the former Washington Bullets, among others.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 17, 1992
NEW YORK -- In a case that provoked impassioned outcries from pet lovers, the owners of the Long Island Pet Cemetery were convicted of mail fraud yesterday for dumping thousands of dead dogs and cats in mass graves and bilking thousands of people who had paid for dignified burials for their pets.The cemetery owners, Samuel J. Strauss, 71, and his son, Alan J. Strauss, 36, were each found guilty of 45 counts of mail fraud and are expected under federal sentencing guidelines to be sentenced to at least 6 1/2 years in prison, said Andrew J. Maloney, the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1997
A story in Saturday's editions failed to completely name the owner of an Elkridge pet cemetery ordered by a Howard County judge to pay $20,000 to aggrieved pet owners. The cemetery owner's name is William Anthony Green.The owner of the troubled Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge has been ordered by a Howard County court to pay about $20,000 to aggrieved pet owners for grave markers he never delivered and for giving pet owners ashes from the wrong animals brought in for cremation.As part of the order, Howard County circuit Judge James B. Dudley said Green's conduct at the pet cemetery involved "lying, misleading and deceiving" clients.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1997
The 16 bereaved pet owners who accuse the owner of Elkridge's Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park pet cemetery of fraud may have to testify again about their complaints. A judge has ruled that there are questions about whether the owner was properly notified about the lawsuit.Circuit Judge James B. Dudley this week nullified the Dec. 23 hearing against William Anthony Green. The ruling means the hearing may have to be repeated.Green, 45, did not attend the "show cause" hearing -- essentially a trial -- and told The Sun afterward he did not know about it.But the Howard County Office of Law has asked the judge to reconsider his decision, saying that Green had been properly notified about the suit, filed by the Howard Office of Consumer Affairs on behalf of the pet owners.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1997
The 16 bereaved pet owners who accuse the owner of Elkridge's Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park pet cemetery of deceiving them will not have to tell their stories of woe under oath again.Reversing an earlier decision, Circuit Judge James B. Dudley ruled that a Dec. 23 "show cause" hearing -- essentially a trial -- was valid. Dudley had nullified the hearing last week after questions arose over whether cemetery owner William A. Green was properly served with the lawsuit.The hearing concerned a suit filed by the Howard County Office of Consumer Affairs on behalf of the 16 pet owners, who alleged in their court testimony that Green never delivered costly grave markers and gave the pet owners ashes from the wrong animals brought in for cremation.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1996
The owner of Elkridge's Rosa Bonheur Memorial pet cemetery has filed for bankruptcy -- possibly limiting chances that 16 disgruntled pet owners can collect thousands of dollars in claims against him.William Anthony Green filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy protection in late October, about three weeks after civil and criminal charges were filed against him after an investigation by the Howard County Office of Consumer Affairs acting on behalf of the pet owners.The...
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1997
The troubled Rosa Bonheur pet cemetery in Elkridge has been left adrift -- with no one taking care of the property and dead pets thawing in a freezer without electric power.In the wake of an unsuccessful effort by the cemetery's owner to give the property back to a bank -- which the bank has not accepted -- it remains unclear who is in charge of the 22,000-plot site off U.S. 1 near Route 176.The cemetery's caretaker quit Friday. And after Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. cut off the power at the cemetery, the Howard County Health Department found two dogs -- a Yorkshire terrier and a white, medium-sized dog -- and a pot-bellied pig thawing in a 6-foot by 4-foot freezer yesterday in the cemetery's "preparing room."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
The cremated remains of 240 dogs recovered in an animal hoarding case in Montgomery County four years ago will be buried in a brief ceremony Tuesday at the pet cemetery at the Baltimore Humane Society in Reisterstown. Shelley Janashek, a volunteer for a dog rescue group who was a witness in the case, asked the society for the burial. "I didn't want them to be trash," said Janashek. "I don't have the money to bury this volume of animals. " Wendy Goldband, a spokeswoman for the society, said as far as anyone knows this is the first time the 86-year-old organization has conducted a burial for remains found under these circumstances.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
Owners of pet cemeteries in Baltimore County will have to notify customers of plans to sell or lease their graveyards for development under legislation passed Monday by the County Council. The legislation sponsored by Councilman David Marks, a Perry Hall Republican, was spurred by complaints about the Oakleigh Pet Cemetery in Parkville, which has faced numerous code-enforcement fines. Some believe the cemetery could be sold for development. Under the legislation, pet cemetery owners will have to publish a notice in a general-circulation newspaper of plans to develop a cemetery for any other purpose, and give written notice to every plot owner.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
At the Oakleigh Pet Cemetery in Parkville, Bobby the Wonder Monkey's tombstone is hidden in ivy. Weeds surround the grave of Monsetta, remembered as "Our only girl. " And on Snookie's stone marker, the epitaph "Until the end our faithful pal" is barely visible behind the brush. The owner of the 2.5-acre cemetery near Loch Raven Boulevard says he is trying to clean up, but he has racked up nearly $30,000 in unpaid county fines and fees for persistent problems such as overgrown vegetation, junk scattered on the grounds and broken windows.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
Colonial Players closes its 2009-10 season with Tom Strelich's 1992 play "Dog Logic," about the caretaker of a seedy pet cemetery being pushed into selling the land by greedy developers. Hertel (played by Ben Carr) took over the cemetery when his father died. Now real estate developers envision a shopping mall in place of Pet Heaven — an attractive idea to Hertel's long-lost mother and his ex-wife, who want their share of the inherited property. Carr instantly connects with the audience as he delivers a series of monologues that reveal his quirky former hippie self, a man who respects and empathizes more with dogs than with people.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | June 2, 2006
The Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge looks again, like a peaceful pet cemetery, with a neatly manicured lawn and fake flowers gracing some of the graves. Gone is the sea of 2-foot-tall grass. Sunken gravestones have been raised and detailed. Dead tree branches have been cleared away. The cosmetic changes at the pet cemetery -- whose owner has said it is closed -- are because of volunteers who have taken it on themselves to ensure that their pets and others have a serene resting place.
NEWS
By ERIKA D. PETERMAN and ERIKA D. PETERMAN,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1998
The embattled Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park pet cemetery has reopened for business, and its manager hopes patrons can help restore it to its past glory.Bookkeeper and manager Marilyn Phillips said the Elkridge cemetery reopened May 1 and is in the midst of a records reorganization. The facility had been foreclosed on and bought by a new owner after a series of incidents, including undelivered grave markers, doubts about the location of pet remains and pet ashes being delivered to the wrong owners.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1997
A nonprofit animal advocacy group -- concerned about the fate of the 22,000 animals buried at Elkridge's embattled pet cemetery -- wants to take over the property temporarily to rescue it from legal limbo.Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park on U.S. 1 essentially has been abandoned since last week when its owner tried to give it back to the bank -- a move that the bank has resisted because of the cemetery's many troubles.Even as the Baltimore-based Animal Welfare League tries to resolve problems at the cemetery -- home to the deceased pets of former Maryland Gov. William Donald Schaefer and stripper Blaze Starr -- cemetery owner William A. Green is facing new legal scrutiny.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1997
Months after Maryland pet owners began pouring their crushed hearts out on witness stands in Howard County courtrooms, the pet cemetery owner who cheated them said he was sorry.William A. Green, the former owner of Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge, admitted to a Howard County District Court judge yesterday that he mismanaged the 22,000-plot cemetery -- mismanagement that attorneys say caused some customers who brought their animals for cremation to receive the wrong ashes.Green, who previously blamed an elaborate employee conspiracy for his problems, apologized for the first time yesterday at his sentencing hearing before Judge James N. Vaughan.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
Just when it seemed things couldn't get worse for the troubled Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park pet cemetery in Elkridge, a new problem has arrived right across the street.Competition.Noah's Garden of Pets, on the property of the sprawling Meadowridge Memorial Park cemetery on Washington Boulevard, is planning to make a splash with its facility, currently being touted in newspaper ads illustrated with animals boarding an ark. Meadowridge plans a summer rededication ceremony and is running burial plot specials "to aid the pet community at this time."
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