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NEWS
July 1, 2001
Pesto is a wonderful paste of basil, cheese, nuts, garlic and olive oil that can be used in a number of dishes. A few tablespoons add flavor to soups and casseroles. Stir a teaspoon into mayonnaise for a sandwich. Mix a cup of it into hot pasta and add fresh chopped tomatoes and black olives for a light supper. Slathered on fresh bread and toasted, it's a delicious hors d'oeuvre. Pesto can easily be frozen in small batches for use all winter. For every two cups of fresh leaves (no stems)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette
The Baltimore Sun
| July 9, 2013
I was visiting my sister in New England on our weekly CSA pickup day, so my husband dutifully went out to the farm to get our haul. Once home, he prepped all the veggies, carefully placing them in the crispers of the fridge. He even took a photo of this week's Community Supported Agriculture bounty, and sent me a caption identifying everything in clockwise order: Garlic, lettuce, mustard greens, broccoli, raspberries, beets, carrots, basil. So helpful. When I got home, three days later, everything was still there waiting for me to come up with exciting recipes.
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NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 15, 2006
Most of us know pesto as the popular sauce of fresh basil, olive oil, garlic, pine nuts and grated parmesan cheese (walnuts and/or pecorino are used instead in some versions). And so it is, but pesto also can refer to other sauces, writes Beverly Cox in Classic Italian Cooking for the Vegetarian Gourmet. The word merely means "pounded," which is how the sauce is traditionally prepared with mortar and pestle. This pesto variation takes advantage of fresh chives. The sauce is used as a flavor intensifier - dotted on the finished dish instead of being stirred in. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
Two weekend of St. Patrick's Day. Truly we are blessed. There is so much going on Saturday. Take a look at the Baltimore Sun's St. Patrick's Day Guide 2012 . Here's our favorite event so far. Down at Mr. Rain's Fun House , Chef Bill Buszinski will debut his “ pre-spring ” menu highlighting his favorite seasonal ingredients such as shad roe, lamb and rabbit, with an optional beer pairing from Perez Klebahn featuring craft...
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | February 23, 2009
Buying pesto at Atwater's in Belvedere Square, we learned that you can save a few calories if you break from tradition. A 1/4 -cup serving of CIBO Naturals cilantro-lime pesto saves 60 calories, 5 grams fat and 2 grams saturated fat over the classic basil version. It's also lower in sodium. Kate Shatzkin CIBO Naturals classic basil pesto Per 1/4 cup: 330 calories 34 grams fat 5 grams saturated fat 3 grams carbohydrate 1 gram fiber 10 milligrams cholesterol 260 milligrams sodium CIBO Naturals cilantro-lime pesto Per 1/4 cup: 270 calories 29 grams fat 3 grams saturated fat 2 grams carbohydrate Trace fiber 5 milligrams cholesterol 160 milligrams sodium
FEATURES
By Babs Suzanne Harrison and Babs Suzanne Harrison,Dallas Morning News | July 14, 1991
The classic Italian pesto is a rich, aromatic paste of basil, garlic, pine nuts, Parmesan cheese and olive oil. Traditionally prepared with a mortar and pestle, it's served with pasta and thinly sliced boiled potatoes, or as a flavoring for soups.But pesto variations abound, in Italy and around the world.Some Italians chop the ingredients and, in autumn, substitute walnuts for pine nuts. In northern Spain, pesto finds its counterpart in Catalan cuisine, where a "picada" includes pounded pine nuts, almonds and hazelnuts mixed with garlic, parsley and olive oil. In southern France, tomatoes are pureed along with basil, garlic and oil to make "pistou," a sauce that is stirred into soups just before serving.
FEATURES
By Seattle Times | October 2, 1991
The following quick and easy recipe was prepared by CeCe Sullivan, home economist on the staff of The Seattle Times, based on an idea from Mitch Sullivan.) Salmon with Coriander Pesto1 medium clove garlic, peeled and minced2 tablespoons pine nuts1 cup packed coriander (cilantro) leaves1 tablespoon margarineteaspoon saltFreshly ground black pepper to taste2 pounds salmon filletPut the garlic and pine nuts into a food processor; mince finely. Add the coriander and chop finely. Add the margarine, salt and several grindings of black pepper.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | October 21, 2009
As soon as the first snowflake falls in Garrett County, basil plants in Baltimore fold for the season. That is an exaggeration, but only a slight one. Basil is a weather wimp, the first plant to swoon when the temperatures dip near freezing, if only for a few hours. One day it is green, leafy and verdant and the next it is black, woody and kaput. Cue the leaf pickers. As soon as there is a slight chill in the air, they start plucking basil leaves from the plants, turning them into a variety of dishes but mainly pesto.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | August 30, 1995
It would be hard to find a speedier and more suitable recipe for summer grilling than pesto-doused Chicken Spiedini with colorful vegetables. Spiedini is nothing more than the Italian name for skewered foods or a kebab, and it certainly sounds fast. Grilling time should be less than 12 minutes and the prep is very simple.You may find this treatment for the pesto to be rather unusual, for it is brushed on liberally after the spiedini have been grilled rather than serving as a marinade and grilling sauce.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | January 10, 2007
Many Italians consider the traditional crushing of fresh herbs, garlic, parmesan cheese and olive oil in a mortar and pestle the only way to make a true pesto sauce. While fresh basil and parsley are the ingredients for the classic pesto, almost any herb or vegetable can be used. Sun-dried tomatoes have an intense, sweet flavor and make a flavorful pesto sauce. Pine nuts, also called pignoli, are essential for an authentic pesto. They are small seeds of the Mediterranean stone pine. They can be found in the spice, nuts or baking section of the supermarket.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011
While the en papillote ("in parchment") method of cooking might sound a little too fancy for tailgating, Mark Graham, in his Dinner Tonight column for the Chicago Tribune, has suggested that it's really nothing more than food wrapped in parchment paper and cooked. What may sound intimidating turns out to be a handy method for cooking at a tailgate or other outdoor party. The packets can be easily assembled at home and then grilled at the tailgate party. They travel well in a cooler of ice. Instead of parchment paper, which can be tricky for first-time users, his recipe uses foil for these salmon-and-veggie packets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | April 6, 2011
It’s National Grilled Cheese Month. You heard me right. If anything deserves a month, it’s definitely grilled cheese. This comforting classic, when made just right, can elicit the loudest of “mmm’s.” It’s perfect in its simplicity; toasty buttery bread stuffed with melted cheese. To celebrate and honor this beloved sandwich, I’ve made a couple versions of a slightly more grown-up and refined grilled cheese. Try them out, or take the inspiration and spin your own grilled cheese creation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | April 5, 2011
I was trolling the grocery store last weekend looking for pesto. The kind that sits in a jar on the shelf kind of creeps me out and the fresh options were either nonexistent or too expensive. So, I thought, why not make it myself? Turns out it’s easy to make and takes no time at all! The flavor is also much fresher than what you can find on the shelf. Pesto Recipe 4 C fresh organic basil, packed 1/2 C extra virgin olive oil 1/3 C pine nuts 1/2 C freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano 6-7 cloves garlic 1/2 tsp sea salt   1. Rinse the basil well, pull off any large stems, and dry well.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2011
Any place that can shut me up, slow me down and get me to smell the roses wins a spot on my list of favorite places. When it also happens to serve a really great cup of coffee, I designate it a personal four-star restaurant. These places invariably display character that flavors every other trait and detail. Enter Red Canoe Bookstore and Cafe. 12:45 I am behind schedule with an early afternoon meeting looming and weighty work-related issues burdening my brain. Glancing around as we walk through a tiny dining room, my friend and I see no empty tables.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | October 21, 2009
As soon as the first snowflake falls in Garrett County, basil plants in Baltimore fold for the season. That is an exaggeration, but only a slight one. Basil is a weather wimp, the first plant to swoon when the temperatures dip near freezing, if only for a few hours. One day it is green, leafy and verdant and the next it is black, woody and kaput. Cue the leaf pickers. As soon as there is a slight chill in the air, they start plucking basil leaves from the plants, turning them into a variety of dishes but mainly pesto.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | February 23, 2009
Buying pesto at Atwater's in Belvedere Square, we learned that you can save a few calories if you break from tradition. A 1/4 -cup serving of CIBO Naturals cilantro-lime pesto saves 60 calories, 5 grams fat and 2 grams saturated fat over the classic basil version. It's also lower in sodium. Kate Shatzkin CIBO Naturals classic basil pesto Per 1/4 cup: 330 calories 34 grams fat 5 grams saturated fat 3 grams carbohydrate 1 gram fiber 10 milligrams cholesterol 260 milligrams sodium CIBO Naturals cilantro-lime pesto Per 1/4 cup: 270 calories 29 grams fat 3 grams saturated fat 2 grams carbohydrate Trace fiber 5 milligrams cholesterol 160 milligrams sodium
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 14, 2005
This combo of pesto, artichoke and toasted pine nuts is based on the "Pete's a Pie" pizza served at Randy's Wooster Street, a small chain of pizza shops in Connecticut. This pie epitomizes what I call the New Haven school of pizza-making: super-thin pies sparingly adorned with flavorful ingredients, then baked to an appealing crispness at super-high temperatures in wood- or coal-fired ovens. Your home oven won't get the crust quite as crisp but the pizza still will be delicious. Tips Varieties of ready-made pizza doughs or crusts are available at supermarkets.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | February 24, 1999
* Item: Mueller's Savory Collection Flavored Pasta* What you get: 6 servings* Cost: About $2.25* Preparation time: 5 to 8 minutes stove top* Review: I think flavored pastas are one of the most versatile products on supermarket shelves. As a fan, I was looking forward to trying Mueller's new line. But Pesto Linguine and Pesto Cavatappi were the only winners in the bunch. Mueller may be on to something there, since there aren't a lot of decent basil-flavored pastas on the mass market. But the other flavors were disappointing.
NEWS
By Denise Martin and Donna Deane and Denise Martin and Donna Deane,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 2, 2008
A let's-get-a-few-friends-together soiree begs for party snacks with a few surprise ingredients - bite-size turnovers that have personality and that go down perfectly with either a glass of crisp, cool white wine or a light summer ale. These are life-of-the-party appetizers. Green and leafy watercress puts a peppery twist on traditional spanakopita, and fresh herbs and wild mushrooms class up mini calzones with truffle cheese. Ripe plantains used as the "dough" for festive vegetarian empanadas are a sweet-savory indulgence, light enough for a summer evening.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | April 9, 2008
We used sun-dried tomatoes packed in olive oil in a pesto to dress up these easy pork medallions. If using dehydrated sun-dried tomatoes, rehydrate first in a cup of hot water for 15 to 20 minutes until soft. You will have plenty of the sun-dried pesto left over for another use, such as spreading on bread for an appetizer or snack. A California pinot noir would go nicely with this. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Pork Medallions With Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto Makes 2 servings 1 cup sun-dried tomatoes, drained, oil reserved 1 clove garlic, roughly chopped 1/4 cup fresh basil leaves, julienne 2 tablespoons capers, drained 1 pork tenderloin, sliced into 1-inch thick medallions 1/4 teaspoon salt freshly ground pepper 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 cup each: white wine, canned chicken broth Place sun-dried tomatoes, garlic, basil, capers and 2 tablespoons of the reserved oil in a food processor.
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