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NEWS
March 31, 2010
The Baltimore Health Department received a $250,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to fund less toxic pest control for city homes, schools and businesses. Called the Safe Pest Management for Health Initiative, the program aims to reduce the use of toxic pesticides in favor of a concept called integrated pest management, which is less harmful and more environmentally sensitive, according to health officials. The strategy relies on preventive measures first - such as sealing cracks and properly storing food - continuing with less hazardous options, if needed.
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2012
Cookouts aside, Labor Day is meant to celebrate the American workforce, and its achievements. But these days, even though people are more thankful than ever for their jobs, there's still room to gripe about the absurd, the mundane and the nearly unbelievable things they've done in exchange for a paycheck. Whether it's crazy responsibilities or a terrible boss, everyone seems to have a job-related tale of grief and woe. We invited Sun readers to share stories from their worst jobs.
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BUSINESS
By DAN THAN DANG | August 14, 2007
Elizabeth Pearsall's not quite sure which bugged her more: the nefarious little subterranean wood eaters threatening her home or the pest control firm that went M.I.A. after she paid the service bill. I'll give you a hint: With a little help from the attorney general's office, the 62-year-old retired high school teacher eliminated one problem and kept the other. But let's go back to the beginning, when Pearsall hired Memphis, Tenn.-based Terminix Pest Control Co. three years ago to zap the termite trouble she inherited along with her parents' 50-year-old Cape Cod in Randallstown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
"Just because you shot Jesse James does not make you Jesse James," Mike tells Walt late in "Hazard Pay", shooting him back to earth and, at the same, antagonizing Walt to do something stupid. The power struggle between the somehow noble Mike and ego-maniac Walt/Heisenberg continued in the third episode of "Breaking Bad's" fifth season. When Mike lays down the parameters and responsibilities of the new team in Saul's office, he assumes the role as the company's alpha male.  "I handle the business," he says sternly.
NEWS
December 15, 2003
James A. Preston, a retired exterminating company technician and Korean War veteran, died of undetermined causes Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Bolton Hill resident was 70. Mr. Preston was born in Baltimore and raised on South Caroline Street. He attended parochial schools and enlisted in the Army in 1949. He was wounded in combat in Korea and discharged in 1950. For many years, Mr. Preston was general manager of Monumental Moving & Storage Co. From the late 1970s until retiring in 1985, he was a senior technician for Pied Piper Pest Control.
NEWS
April 25, 2007
Robert B. Hardiman, a district manager for a Baltimore pest control company and an avid tennis player, died Friday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of heart failure resulting from sepsis. He was 63. Born in Baltimore and raised in Essex, Mr. Hardiman was a 1961 graduate of Kenwood High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in English in 1965 from what is now Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, W.Va. Drafted into the Army in 1965, Mr. Hardiman was assigned to Okinawa for two years in finance and accounting while a member of the Army tennis team.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 27, 2003
The primary strategy for dealing with termites has long been to create a chemical barrier around the house to act as a moat of sorts to keep the hungry little fellows at a distance. Now, pest control professionals have adopted a couple of new strategies. Rather than merely repel the insects - leaving them to regroup and fight another day - they try to eliminate them. "Termites cause billions of dollars in damage each year," said Michael F. Potter, a professor of urban entomology at the University of Kentucky.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1998
A handful of parents met with Howard County school officials and a pest control expert yesterday to learn more about the school system's use of pesticides and how students' families can be notified.Though mostly satisfied with the school system's efforts to keep chemicals away from students, some parents still were concerned about the possible effect of pesticides on sensitive children.The meeting was prompted in part by two dueling House bills before the General Assembly. One would require public schools to give parents and employees advance notice when pesticides are used.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1999
It's the females that bite.Ellen Wilgar learned this while working to keep track of the mosquito population by baring her arms each night in the headlights of a truck and being eaten alive by them.As a state pest control technician, Wilgar captures, kills and counts mosquitoes -- by letting them feed on her flesh -- to determine if the neighborhoods she patrols in eastern Baltimore County should be sprayed with insecticide.Some people might see Wilgar's job using herself as live bait as a nightly exercise in pain -- certainly worth more than the $7.70 an hour it pays.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2012
Cookouts aside, Labor Day is meant to celebrate the American workforce, and its achievements. But these days, even though people are more thankful than ever for their jobs, there's still room to gripe about the absurd, the mundane and the nearly unbelievable things they've done in exchange for a paycheck. Whether it's crazy responsibilities or a terrible boss, everyone seems to have a job-related tale of grief and woe. We invited Sun readers to share stories from their worst jobs.
NEWS
March 31, 2010
The Baltimore Health Department received a $250,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to fund less toxic pest control for city homes, schools and businesses. Called the Safe Pest Management for Health Initiative, the program aims to reduce the use of toxic pesticides in favor of a concept called integrated pest management, which is less harmful and more environmentally sensitive, according to health officials. The strategy relies on preventive measures first - such as sealing cracks and properly storing food - continuing with less hazardous options, if needed.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | June 25, 2009
As if the mosquitoes weren't bad enough, the rainy weather in recent weeks has also brought out another insect pest - swarming termites, streaming up out of the ground, or the woodwork. Michael Short, an inspector for J.C. Ehrlich Pest Control in Baltimore, was called recently to a home in Owings Mills. The winged critters were "all over the floor in the foyer, literally covering the foyer," he said. "The customer was obviously very concerned." The bugs weren't out to eat the house, just to mate and establish new colonies.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | December 15, 2007
The lower leaves of my new Encore azalea are turning brownish. Is this variety partly deciduous, or do I have a disease problem? The plant was healthy all spring and summer and bloomed well. Healthy evergreen azaleas often exhibit color change in fall and winter. Depending on variety and site conditions, colors range from purple-reds to yellow-greens. They can be quite attractive in the winter landscape. Azaleas normally drop a few leaves in the fall, but the majority remain and green up in plenty of time for spring floral displays.
BUSINESS
By DAN THAN DANG | August 14, 2007
Elizabeth Pearsall's not quite sure which bugged her more: the nefarious little subterranean wood eaters threatening her home or the pest control firm that went M.I.A. after she paid the service bill. I'll give you a hint: With a little help from the attorney general's office, the 62-year-old retired high school teacher eliminated one problem and kept the other. But let's go back to the beginning, when Pearsall hired Memphis, Tenn.-based Terminix Pest Control Co. three years ago to zap the termite trouble she inherited along with her parents' 50-year-old Cape Cod in Randallstown.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | May 31, 2007
Baltimore's school buildings are the oldest in Maryland, so whether there's a leaky roof or a broken boiler, officials are used to having things go wrong. But a school infested with chiggers? "I've never heard of chiggers in my life," said Alice Watson, a longtime school system official. "It's a first for me." The trouble began Friday afternoon at Violetville Elementary, when a teacher noticed on a classroom windowsill a slew of the mite-like bugs, known for bites so itchy they feel like a poison ivy rash.
NEWS
April 25, 2007
Robert B. Hardiman, a district manager for a Baltimore pest control company and an avid tennis player, died Friday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of heart failure resulting from sepsis. He was 63. Born in Baltimore and raised in Essex, Mr. Hardiman was a 1961 graduate of Kenwood High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in English in 1965 from what is now Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, W.Va. Drafted into the Army in 1965, Mr. Hardiman was assigned to Okinawa for two years in finance and accounting while a member of the Army tennis team.
NEWS
By Thomas J. Lueck and Thomas J. Lueck,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 12, 2000
NEW YORK -- With officials noting an alarming increase in New York's rat population, a City Council committee was told Tuesday that the main culprit might be as simple as the ubiquitous plastic garbage bags that have eclipsed metal cans at the curb. Pest control executives said the bags, and the food they contain, are potluck for vermin. "Rats simply rip these bags apart," said Ronald Meringolo, the owner of a Manhattan exterminating company and president of the Professional Pest Control Association of New York State, a trade association.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | May 31, 2007
Baltimore's school buildings are the oldest in Maryland, so whether there's a leaky roof or a broken boiler, officials are used to having things go wrong. But a school infested with chiggers? "I've never heard of chiggers in my life," said Alice Watson, a longtime school system official. "It's a first for me." The trouble began Friday afternoon at Violetville Elementary, when a teacher noticed on a classroom windowsill a slew of the mite-like bugs, known for bites so itchy they feel like a poison ivy rash.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 25, 2005
"The rats on the street All dance 'round my feet They seem to say `Tracy, it's up to you.'" - lyrics to "Good Morning Baltimore" Aw, rats! Rats may not be the first thing that springs to mind when you think of the Tony Award-winning musical, Hairspray. But a reference to the furry vermin pops up in the opening song, "Good Morning Baltimore." And, to the delight - or horror - of the audience, a pair of mechanical rodents dashes across the stage on cue. Baltimore filmmaker John Waters, whose 1988 movie inspired the musical, has included rats in most of his movies.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2005
Dear Mr. Azrael: My friend purchased her home about four years ago and at the time of the purchase, the seller disclosed that there was a termite problem that had been addressed by a pest control company. The seller indicated that all termite damage to the home had been repaired. My friend recently hired someone to do the painting in her living room because there were several large unusual looking cracks in the walls that needed to be repaired, which she assumed was due to settlement, etc. When the painter/repairman cut the wall to remove the damaged sections, it was discovered that there was quite a bit of "old termite" damage that had never been repaired.
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