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Pessimism

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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 12, 1993
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Youngsters feel their health is threatened because drugs, alcohol and tobacco are so accessible. Those items plus AIDS and environmental pollution have turned U.S. youngsters into a generation of pessimists who believe they will grow up to be less healthy than adults are today, a study released yesterday shows.Commissioned by Northwestern National Life Insurance Co. of Minneapolis, the study also concluded that a majority of the 301 children between ages 12 and 18 who were surveyed engage in unhealthy behaviors such as smoking, drinking and using drugs.
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NEWS
July 31, 2013
It's hardly an exaggeration to describe the long-awaited Israeli-Palestinian peace talks that reconvened in Washington this week as the pre-nuptial ceremony for an arranged marriage between a reluctant couple who neither like nor trust each other much. The two parties practically had to be dragged kicking and screaming to the altar, and there's no guarantee they'll stay there long enough to complete their vows. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry spent several strenuous months prepping the parties to resume negotiations that broke off in 2010, yet the most he was able to get for his trouble was an agreement to talk about future talks.
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SPORTS
By Mark Hyman | June 29, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer yesterday toned down concerns that he has raised about Baltimore's chance to be awarded an NFL expansion franchise.This week, Schaefer told The Washington Post that he was "pessimistic" that the NFL would return to Baltimore.Yesterday, Schaefer clarified those remarks, saying: "My pessimism isn't pessimism. I am talking as a realist."There is no absolute assurance that they are going to come to Baltimore. I think morally they should be here. Financially, they are better off here than other states.
NEWS
June 19, 2012
As a city resident, born and residing in Baltimore since the 1920s, it seems to me that Raymond Daniel Burke's op-ed ("City or oasis on the water?" June 12) and Roz Heid's letter of June 14 are unduly pessimistic and accusatory toward Baltimoreans who did not flee the city during its continuing evolution from the 1950s to the current time. To correct the record, the Inner Harbor concept and its authorization came prior to the riots of 1968. From 1963 to 1967, the developer, James Rouse, together with Mayor Theodore R. McKeldin and the City Council, conceived the plans and enacted the laws.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 21, 1992
LANSING, Mich. -- As the presidential campaign goes into its final two weeks, an uncommon pessimism bordering on resignation appears to have gripped many Republican Party leaders and functionaries. Reports are rife of job resumes circulating madly around Washington and the country from Bush administration officeholders at fairly high levels.Casual conversations with those encountered on the campaign trail, all off the record to be sure, reflect a sense that barring a political miracle between now and Nov. 3, they will be looking at the want ads after the election, or at least letting the professional headhunters know they will be available come the next Inauguration Day, Jan. 20. Some even engage in speculation on who will get the top jobs in the Clinton administration.
SPORTS
By Newsday | January 17, 1993
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- During his most careless moments, Chuck Daly is optimistic. It's unintentional. No one embraces fear as warmly as Daly, who is determined to live up to his moniker, "The Prince of Pessimism."Daly was in his best worrying form Wednesday before the Nets met the Cleveland Cavaliers, when he said without a trace of a smile, "We might never win another game. I don't know. I still get a little nervous. Can we win another game?"The New Jersey Nets had played only 33 games at the time, so Daly's basic concern was a 49-game losing streak.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 15, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- President Nelson Mandela is failing to create a nonracial "rainbow nation" here, according to a new poll that makes depressing reading for the country's black majority government.The poll, conducted by the respected Markinor organization, found society more split along racial lines than in the past, and with pessimism growing among all parts of the population -- blacks, whites and people of mixed race -- about the performance of the 3-year-old government. But pessimism among whites is almost four times as high as among blacks.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | December 17, 1991
For months, the Federal Reserve confidently suggested that an economic upturn was just around the corner.Now, for the first time, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan is saying that he has no clear idea when the economy's current stagnation might end: by spring, by Election Day, by early 1993 or perhaps not until later in the decade.That new pessimism, evident in Greenspan's latest speeches and in recent comments to associates, suggests that the chairman of the nation's central bank now believes new efforts by the Federal Reserve to lower interest rates will not necessarily revive the economy, as lower interest rates have in the past.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 15, 2004
BOSTON -- I never dreamed that I would be feeling quite so cranky this early in the campaign season. Or that I would be driven from my usual sunny disposition to grumpiness by the Optimism Imperative. Have you noticed that the second most overused word in presidential politics -- right after "values" -- is optimism? Optimism is not just an attitude anymore, it's an entire political platform. It's as if both candidates were competing for Optimist in Chief. The whole thing began, as far as I can tell, in February, that dourest of months, when President Bush's campaign manager said: "We're moving into a phase where we will begin contrasting the president's positive, optimistic vision with the alternative."
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | November 27, 1991
The governor and his top education official headlined the state's can-do tour at a stop in Carroll Sunday, advocating reforms to break from the "mediocrity" plaguing Maryland's school system and urging individual initiative to battle the recession.Gov. William Donald Schaefer, State Superintendent of Schools Nancy S. Grasmick and several state agency directors sponsored a breakfast at Western Maryland College to discuss Maryland's pressing issues with business, government and education officials.
NEWS
February 11, 2012
In a Chrysler advertisement aired during halftime of Sunday's Super Bowl, actor and director Clint Eastwood says, "I've seen a lot of tough eras, a lot of tough downturns in my life, times when we didn't understand each other. It seems we've lost our heart at times, and the fog of discord, division and blame made it hard to see what lies ahead. But after those trials, we all rallied around what was right and acted as one. " To judge from the reaction he got, we haven't achieved that last stage just yet. Mr. Eastwood was pilloried the next morning by Republican political strategist and Fox News commentator Karl Rove, among others, as a tool of President Barack Obama's re-election strategy.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | March 14, 2010
The Orioles have reached the midway point in spring training, which is usually about the time every March that perception collides with reality. In this case, there is the public perception that the Orioles are in crisis. Brian Roberts still hasn't made his first exhibition appearance - and probably won't for at least another week. New pitching ace Kevin Millwood has made two Grapefruit League starts, and his ERA looks like a barometer reading. Nolan Reimold is back playing regularly, but his surgically repaired ankle is not yet 100 percent.
NEWS
By Kellie Woodhouse and Kellie Woodhouse,kellie.woodhouse@baltsun.com | March 1, 2009
The year 2018 might seem a long way out, but Anne Arundel County residents appear to have clear visions of what life will be like then, according to survey conducted recently by Anne Arundel Community College's Institute for the Future. People are worried. Residents predict that energy costs will continue to rise, more population will lead to increased traffic congestion, and illegal immigration and crime will go up. And the economy won't recover significantly in 10 years, either. These were the major findings when AACC surveyed 312 county residents over the age of 18 about their expectations for 2018.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis | April 13, 2008
Forget the scenes of blissful gray-haired couples prancing on exotic moonlit beaches. As Americans contemplate their futures, they are a pessimistic crew - more pessimistic than any time in nearly two decades about their prospects for retiring comfortably, according to a study by the Employee Benefit Research Institute, a nonprofit organization that has been surveying Americans since 1991. More than 80 percent of working Americans questioned said they are not sure they will have enough money to get through retirement.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | March 30, 2008
With the downturn in the economy, Americans' economic prospects appear grim. Their houses are losing value. The balance in their 401ks are dropping. Prices for food and gas are going up. Those who observe public behavior say the barrage of bad headlines and personal circumstances are certain, at least for a time, to change the way people view themselves, their lot, even society as a whole. History shows that adversity -- death, destruction or financial strain -- does this to people. But the new perspectives, they said, are not always negative.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | May 8, 2006
NEW YORK -- I went to the grannies for a booster shot of optimism. It was that kind of a week. We just passed the third anniversary of the flight-suit photo op and its mission unaccomplished. The plunge in the president's approval ratings, down to 33 percent, hasn't translated into a howl of protest but a low-level depression. And the Official Bush Countdown Clock is barely a tick below 1,000 days. But in Manhattan, 18 women of granny age, full of wit and wisdom, have just won a court case and sent their protest story around the world.
NEWS
February 23, 1992
The portrait of the Maryland electorate reflected in today's Sun Poll is a recession portrait: the picture of a people obsessed not only with a long downturn in the economy but increasingly doubtful that their society is well organized or adequately motivated to make things better.Cynicism, pessimism and apathy -- these are the moods revealed in follow-up interviews conducted by Sun reporters. We don't mind the cynicism displayed toward the political and big business establishment; indeed, we welcome it if it becomes a vehicle for impatience and change.
NEWS
By Christopher Carroll | April 13, 2001
The Bush administration's persistent public pessimism about the economy runs a serious risk of becoming a self-fulfilling prophecy. The downbeat pronouncements began even before the Florida election controversy was over; on "Meet the Press" Dec. 3, Vice President Dick Cheney said "we may well be on the front edge of a recession," though no reputable economic forecasters were predicting recession at the time. Since then, Mr. Cheney, Mr. Bush and other administration officials repeatedly have made statements conspicuously more gloomy than would have been expected from the objective economic indicators.
NEWS
By TOM DUNKEL and TOM DUNKEL,SUN REPORTER | April 4, 2006
Nursing a beer at a bar across from Camden Yards a couple of hours before game time yesterday, John Castro wasn't in any mood to predict a pennant for the Orioles this year. He has been to about 20 Opening Days, but after eight straight losing seasons, he knows better than to get caught up in Opening Day euphoria. Just then, all the 49-year-old respiratory therapist from Severna Park was willing to predict was a 6-5 win over Tampa Bay. Whattayaknow? The Orioles wound up stinging the Devil Rays 9-6. Currently in first place.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH MEHREN and ELIZABETH MEHREN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 6, 2006
BOSTON -- Weariness, anxiety and pessimism are pervasive among survivors of Hurricane Katrina, according to preliminary findings of a major study announced yesterday by the Harvard Medical School. Four months after the storm ravaged the Gulf Coast, "a lot of people are having trouble reconciling the extreme breadth of their loss," said Anthony H. Speier, director of disaster mental health operations for the Louisiana Office of Mental Health, and a collaborator on the study. "Their homes are gone, their sense of community is gone, their sense of tradition is gone," Speier said.
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