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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 16, 2006
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- Three people died yesterday during violent protests in two cities over caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad published in Western newspapers. Demonstrators continued to ransack foreign companies across Pakistan as the death toll in protests this week rose to five. Authorities said two people died yesterday in Peshawar and one in Lahore. Caricatures mocking Muhammad were originally printed in a Danish newspaper in September. The cartoons were reprinted in several Western countries by publications whose editors said they were defending freedom of the press.
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NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,Tribune Newspapers | July 17, 2009
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - -A U.N. official and a guard were shot and killed Thursday during a botched kidnapping attempt at a displacement camp in northwest Pakistan, underscoring the level of violence plaguing the country even as government leaders assert it's safe for camp dwellers to return home to the volatile Swat Valley. The slayings occurred at the Kacha Garhi camp outside Peshawar, northwest Pakistan's largest city. Zelle Usman, a Pakistani citizen and a U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees field officer assigned to the camp, was in his car getting ready to leave late Thursday morning when four gunmen approached and tried to kidnap him, said Abdul Ghafoor Afridi, a senior Peshawar police official.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 28, 2007
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- An apparent suicide bombing killed at least 13 people yesterday in this volatile border city, a day after a suicide attack killed a bomber and a hotel security guard in the Pakistani capital. It was not immediately clear whether the attack in Peshawar, which came during the year's most important Shiite Muslim holiday, was an act of sectarian violence or was aimed at police and paramilitary forces. Nearly all the dead were reported to be police officers, including the city's police chief.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 13, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - For the six months he helped execute the "hearts and minds" outreach of the United States in one of the most dangerous front lines of the American battle against militants, Stephen D. Vance had to balance a strategic mission with nearly daily concerns about his personal safety. Yesterday, as he was arriving at his office in a residential area of turbulent Peshawar, he was shot and killed by gunmen, becoming the most prominent casualty of an increasingly troubled effort to use economic aid to undercut the hold of al-Qaida and the Taliban on Pakistan's tribal areas.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 13, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - For the six months he helped execute the "hearts and minds" outreach of the United States in one of the most dangerous front lines of the American battle against militants, Stephen D. Vance had to balance a strategic mission with nearly daily concerns about his personal safety. Yesterday, as he was arriving at his office in a residential area of turbulent Peshawar, he was shot and killed by gunmen, becoming the most prominent casualty of an increasingly troubled effort to use economic aid to undercut the hold of al-Qaida and the Taliban on Pakistan's tribal areas.
NEWS
By Zulfiqar Ali and Laura King and Zulfiqar Ali and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 16, 2007
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- A suicide bomber blew himself up yesterday in a hotel restaurant popular with Afghans, killing at least 22 people and injuring scores in what might be a sign of the Afghan conflict spilling over into Pakistan's cities. The explosion in Peshawar, a provincial capital close to the lawless tribal areas that straddle the Afghan-Pakistan frontier, came one day after a U.S. soldier was killed in an ambush on the Pakistan side of the border - a rare Western combat casualty inside Pakistan.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 16, 2001
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - Their country is under bombardment and their nation under siege, but the members of the Afghan national cricket team turned up here on schedule to play in a Pakistani tournament beginning yesterday, strolling onto a dusty pitch in the town of Peshawar in their pressed white uniforms as though there were nothing more important in the world than the game ahead. In some ways, there wasn't. There is a golden rule that nothing can be allowed to get in the way of a cricket match, not even war, and it is a reflection of the importance of cricket in Afghanistan that the team was allowed to come at all, for the first match of the trophy contest against local club Nowshera.
NEWS
By MELISSA B. ROBINSON | February 16, 1992
Badaber, Pakistan. -- Zabhullah Bitab doesn't remember much of life before his family came 13 years ago to this dusty, sprawling refugee camp in northwestern Pakistan.Still, the energetic 15-year-old says he would like to go back across the arid mountains to his native Afghanistan to pursue his goal of becoming a doctor. Or an architect."We want to work," he says of the Badaber refugees. "I'd like to become a doctor, but we haven't the money for this. . . . I want to go to school. I want to live in the city."
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,Tribune Newspapers | July 17, 2009
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - -A U.N. official and a guard were shot and killed Thursday during a botched kidnapping attempt at a displacement camp in northwest Pakistan, underscoring the level of violence plaguing the country even as government leaders assert it's safe for camp dwellers to return home to the volatile Swat Valley. The slayings occurred at the Kacha Garhi camp outside Peshawar, northwest Pakistan's largest city. Zelle Usman, a Pakistani citizen and a U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees field officer assigned to the camp, was in his car getting ready to leave late Thursday morning when four gunmen approached and tried to kidnap him, said Abdul Ghafoor Afridi, a senior Peshawar police official.
NEWS
December 8, 2009
LAHORE, Pakistan - Bombings in two Pakistan cities killed 46 people Monday, as militants struck back in the wake of an army offensive against a Taliban stronghold in the northwest near the Afghan border. Two synchronized bombs ripped through a market in the eastern Pakistani city of Lahore about 9 p.m., igniting a massive fire that killed 36 people, authorities said. Hours earlier a suicide bomber killed 10 people outside a courthouse in the northwestern city of Peshawar.
NEWS
By Zulfiqar Ali and Laura King and Zulfiqar Ali and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 16, 2007
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- A suicide bomber blew himself up yesterday in a hotel restaurant popular with Afghans, killing at least 22 people and injuring scores in what might be a sign of the Afghan conflict spilling over into Pakistan's cities. The explosion in Peshawar, a provincial capital close to the lawless tribal areas that straddle the Afghan-Pakistan frontier, came one day after a U.S. soldier was killed in an ambush on the Pakistan side of the border - a rare Western combat casualty inside Pakistan.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 28, 2007
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- An apparent suicide bombing killed at least 13 people yesterday in this volatile border city, a day after a suicide attack killed a bomber and a hotel security guard in the Pakistani capital. It was not immediately clear whether the attack in Peshawar, which came during the year's most important Shiite Muslim holiday, was an act of sectarian violence or was aimed at police and paramilitary forces. Nearly all the dead were reported to be police officers, including the city's police chief.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 16, 2006
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- Three people died yesterday during violent protests in two cities over caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad published in Western newspapers. Demonstrators continued to ransack foreign companies across Pakistan as the death toll in protests this week rose to five. Authorities said two people died yesterday in Peshawar and one in Lahore. Caricatures mocking Muhammad were originally printed in a Danish newspaper in September. The cartoons were reprinted in several Western countries by publications whose editors said they were defending freedom of the press.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 16, 2001
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - Their country is under bombardment and their nation under siege, but the members of the Afghan national cricket team turned up here on schedule to play in a Pakistani tournament beginning yesterday, strolling onto a dusty pitch in the town of Peshawar in their pressed white uniforms as though there were nothing more important in the world than the game ahead. In some ways, there wasn't. There is a golden rule that nothing can be allowed to get in the way of a cricket match, not even war, and it is a reflection of the importance of cricket in Afghanistan that the team was allowed to come at all, for the first match of the trophy contest against local club Nowshera.
NEWS
By MELISSA B. ROBINSON | February 16, 1992
Badaber, Pakistan. -- Zabhullah Bitab doesn't remember much of life before his family came 13 years ago to this dusty, sprawling refugee camp in northwestern Pakistan.Still, the energetic 15-year-old says he would like to go back across the arid mountains to his native Afghanistan to pursue his goal of becoming a doctor. Or an architect."We want to work," he says of the Badaber refugees. "I'd like to become a doctor, but we haven't the money for this. . . . I want to go to school. I want to live in the city."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 8, 2001
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- As the United States launched missile attacks against Afghanistan yesterday, the Muslim government here in neighboring Pakistan braced for unrest, deploying hundreds of troops around the capital. President Pervez Musharraf, apparently trying to make sure of his army's loyalty, fired two generals sympathetic to Afghanistan's Taliban rulers. He also closed all Muslim seminaries and banned public protests in the North-West Frontier Province, a region on the border with Afghanistan that is largely populated by ethnic Afghans, officials said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 16, 2006
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- Rallies around the country continued fitfully yesterday to protest the U.S. airstrikes on a Pakistani village that were intended to kill Ayman al-Zawahri, the No. 2 leader of al-Qaida, but instead killed at least 18 civilians, even as American counterterrorism officials said they were not ready to rule out the prospect that al-Zawahri might have been killed in the Friday strike. Officials in Pakistan, who have examined bodies found at the scene, have said they were confident that al-Zawahri was not killed in the attack.
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