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NEWS
December 28, 2004
Suddenly on December 26, 2004, MELANIE M. PERVEZ (nee Horton); dearest wife of Syed I. Pervez; beloved daughter of Donald Horton and Sandra Leyva; devoted mother of Devan and Destiny Horton; dear sister of Rebecca Horton and Paula Sing; stepsister of Brandon Gruszczynski, Jennifer and Heather Whitcomb; beloved granddaughter of Estella Horton, Robert and Virginia Wingate; dear stepdaughter of Nancy Horton. Also survived by a host of other loving relatives and friends. Funeral Services will be held at the Charles L. Stevens Funeral Home, Inc., 1501 E. Fort Avenue, Locust Point, MD, on Thursday at 10 A.M. Interment in Holy Cross Cemetery.
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NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2007
In Pakistan, the arrests of two acclaimed professors at Lahore University of Management Sciences sparked large student protests. In Baltimore, Riwan Chaudhry became inspired. Lahore is his hometown, the university his alma mater, and the professors his heroes. The doctoral student in computer science at the Johns Hopkins University joined a demonstration outside the Pakistani Embassy calling for an end to Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf's state of emergency, a move that suspended the nation's constitution, imposing de facto martial law. "I've always known this culture of independence in Pakistan, then suddenly, one day it all goes away," said Chaudhry.
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NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 21, 2007
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Election officials said yesterday that President Pervez Musharraf would seek re-election by lawmakers to a five-year term Oct. 6, even though his bid is clouded by legal challenges. The announcement of the date for elections came as the Supreme Court heard another day of arguments from opponents seeking to have the Pakistani leader disqualified from standing for office while serving as army chief. It also came as al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden issued a new audiotape calling on Pakistanis to rise up against the president's rule.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | November 13, 2007
The next few weeks, or maybe days, will determine the fate of Pakistan - a country containing Islamist terrorist groups and nuclear weapons. It's no wonder that Gen. Pervez Musharraf thought the White House would have to back a dictator over a restoration of constitutional rule. After all, President Bush has ditched his democracy pitch in Arab countries like Egypt, where he's bought the argument that only a strongman can hold back the Islamists. But when it comes to Pakistan, that argument doesn't hold water.
NEWS
By Sonni Efron and Sonni Efron,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - Pakistan's president, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, defended yesterday his decision not to allow international investigators to interrogate A.Q. Khan, the Pakistani scientist accused of peddling nuclear secrets around the world. Appearing offended, Musharraf said the requests from United Nations nuclear inspectors indicated a lack of trust in Pakistan. In a CNN interview, he portrayed the issue as a matter of national pride. President Bush met with Musharraf on Saturday and urged the Pakistani general to make sure that all possible information about nuclear proliferation by the Khan network be turned over to the Americans.
NEWS
November 11, 2007
Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf has cracked down on the very citizens best equipped to promote civil society, nurture political moderates and counter extremism in his Muslim nation. As protests against his imposition of emergency rule intensified, the arrests of lawyers, intellectuals and human rights activists expanded to include students and opposition members. On Friday, Pakistani authorities detained opposition leader Benazir Bhutto in her home and quashed a protest march she was to lead.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,Los Angeles Times | September 9, 2007
LONDON -- When former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif was forced into exile nearly eight years ago, few of his compatriots were particularly sorry to see him go. Many Pakistanis, weary of what they considered a corrupt and inefficient government, had welcomed Sharif's ouster at the hands of a no-nonsense military man, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, who promised moderation and stability. Now, Sharif, 57, is poised to make what his followers expect will be a triumphal return -- a homecoming that is certain to trigger more turmoil in what has been the most violent and turbulent year of Musharraf's rule.
NEWS
October 10, 2007
Pakistan's Pervez Musharraf got himself elected president in a country where polls show Osama bin Laden is more popular than he is. Of course, the electorate in last week's balloting was confined to members of the national and regional legislatures. And, oh yes, opposition groups all refused to take part. Even the U.S. Electoral College is more democratic than that. A recent survey found that the one thing Pakistanis want from their government more than anything else is the development of a system with free elections, a free press and an independent judiciary.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | November 13, 2007
The next few weeks, or maybe days, will determine the fate of Pakistan - a country containing Islamist terrorist groups and nuclear weapons. It's no wonder that Gen. Pervez Musharraf thought the White House would have to back a dictator over a restoration of constitutional rule. After all, President Bush has ditched his democracy pitch in Arab countries like Egypt, where he's bought the argument that only a strongman can hold back the Islamists. But when it comes to Pakistan, that argument doesn't hold water.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 19, 2007
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- A lawyer representing Gen. Pervez Musharraf declared in court yesterday that the military leader would give up his role as army chief - but only after he has been re-elected to another term as president. The statement, the first official and public pledge by Musharraf to relinquish the military post that has been the mainstay of his power, was apparently intended to calm Pakistan's political storm. But opponents denounced it as too little, too late. Opposition parties said they would press a legal bid to have Musharraf disqualified from standing for re-election by an electoral college made up of members of the outgoing provincial and national assemblies, which are dominated by allies of the president.
NEWS
November 11, 2007
Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf has cracked down on the very citizens best equipped to promote civil society, nurture political moderates and counter extremism in his Muslim nation. As protests against his imposition of emergency rule intensified, the arrests of lawyers, intellectuals and human rights activists expanded to include students and opposition members. On Friday, Pakistani authorities detained opposition leader Benazir Bhutto in her home and quashed a protest march she was to lead.
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Mark Silva,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 5, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In light of the state of emergency declared by Pakistan's powerful but embattled president and army chief of staff, the Bush administration says it is "reviewing" the billions of dollars in aid provided to that nuclear power in the heart of a terrorist-threatened region. But despite an indefinite delay of promised elections by President Pervez Musharraf, who first seized power with a military coup in 1999, critics say the Bush administration's hands might well be tied for lack of another realistic option in Pakistan.
NEWS
October 10, 2007
Pakistan's Pervez Musharraf got himself elected president in a country where polls show Osama bin Laden is more popular than he is. Of course, the electorate in last week's balloting was confined to members of the national and regional legislatures. And, oh yes, opposition groups all refused to take part. Even the U.S. Electoral College is more democratic than that. A recent survey found that the one thing Pakistanis want from their government more than anything else is the development of a system with free elections, a free press and an independent judiciary.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 21, 2007
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Election officials said yesterday that President Pervez Musharraf would seek re-election by lawmakers to a five-year term Oct. 6, even though his bid is clouded by legal challenges. The announcement of the date for elections came as the Supreme Court heard another day of arguments from opponents seeking to have the Pakistani leader disqualified from standing for office while serving as army chief. It also came as al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden issued a new audiotape calling on Pakistanis to rise up against the president's rule.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 19, 2007
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- A lawyer representing Gen. Pervez Musharraf declared in court yesterday that the military leader would give up his role as army chief - but only after he has been re-elected to another term as president. The statement, the first official and public pledge by Musharraf to relinquish the military post that has been the mainstay of his power, was apparently intended to calm Pakistan's political storm. But opponents denounced it as too little, too late. Opposition parties said they would press a legal bid to have Musharraf disqualified from standing for re-election by an electoral college made up of members of the outgoing provincial and national assemblies, which are dominated by allies of the president.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,Los Angeles Times | September 9, 2007
LONDON -- When former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif was forced into exile nearly eight years ago, few of his compatriots were particularly sorry to see him go. Many Pakistanis, weary of what they considered a corrupt and inefficient government, had welcomed Sharif's ouster at the hands of a no-nonsense military man, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, who promised moderation and stability. Now, Sharif, 57, is poised to make what his followers expect will be a triumphal return -- a homecoming that is certain to trigger more turmoil in what has been the most violent and turbulent year of Musharraf's rule.
NEWS
By Mubashir Zaidi and Henry Chu and Mubashir Zaidi and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2007
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- President Pervez Musharraf, beset by increasing public discontent over his military-backed regime, has not decided whether to step down as Pakistan's army chief and become purely a civilian leader, his aides said yesterday. The statement came a day after exiled former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto announced that Musharraf had agreed to give up his military uniform as part of a potential power-sharing deal. "The issue of the uniform will be decided by the president ... and he will not take any pressure on that issue," Information Minister Mohammed Ali Durrani said.
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Mark Silva,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 5, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In light of the state of emergency declared by Pakistan's powerful but embattled president and army chief of staff, the Bush administration says it is "reviewing" the billions of dollars in aid provided to that nuclear power in the heart of a terrorist-threatened region. But despite an indefinite delay of promised elections by President Pervez Musharraf, who first seized power with a military coup in 1999, critics say the Bush administration's hands might well be tied for lack of another realistic option in Pakistan.
NEWS
By Mubashir Zaidi and Henry Chu and Mubashir Zaidi and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2007
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- President Pervez Musharraf, beset by increasing public discontent over his military-backed regime, has not decided whether to step down as Pakistan's army chief and become purely a civilian leader, his aides said yesterday. The statement came a day after exiled former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto announced that Musharraf had agreed to give up his military uniform as part of a potential power-sharing deal. "The issue of the uniform will be decided by the president ... and he will not take any pressure on that issue," Information Minister Mohammed Ali Durrani said.
NEWS
December 28, 2004
Suddenly on December 26, 2004, MELANIE M. PERVEZ (nee Horton); dearest wife of Syed I. Pervez; beloved daughter of Donald Horton and Sandra Leyva; devoted mother of Devan and Destiny Horton; dear sister of Rebecca Horton and Paula Sing; stepsister of Brandon Gruszczynski, Jennifer and Heather Whitcomb; beloved granddaughter of Estella Horton, Robert and Virginia Wingate; dear stepdaughter of Nancy Horton. Also survived by a host of other loving relatives and friends. Funeral Services will be held at the Charles L. Stevens Funeral Home, Inc., 1501 E. Fort Avenue, Locust Point, MD, on Thursday at 10 A.M. Interment in Holy Cross Cemetery.
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