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NEWS
December 15, 2011
I read with interest Rabbi Nina Beth Cardin's recent commentary on our appetite for more ("The problem of desire," Dec. 12). She rightly describes desire as "that shape-shifting seducer" which can never be satisfied. She also points out the positive aspects of desire as driving our ambition and our curiosity. Her essay showed the dilemma of desire: It can have a good form and a bad form. As a Christian Scientist, I have grappled with a proper view of desire, but have found answers in the words of Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of Christian Science.
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NEWS
By Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2014
More than three decades ago, 22-year-old Annapolis native Andy Teeling climbed aboard his 16-foot dory and embarked on an ambitious journey to circumnavigate the 450-mile coastline of the Delmarva Peninsula in a rowboat. After two months of rowing under the summer sun, and with his first semester of college beckoning him back to shore, Teeling's journey was stalled in Chincoteague, Va., 150 miles short of his goal. This week Teeling, 35 years later at age 57, finished the adventure.
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | January 22, 2012
Nobody wants to hear about perspective at a time like this. It's just too soon. The disappointment is too raw. The Ravens will be watching the New England Patriots represent the AFC in the Super Bowl even though Joe Flacco outplayed Tom Brady and – for a split second – Lee Evans had his arms around the game-winning touchdown. This one's going to hurt for awhile. Just ask Billy Cundiff, who missed a short field goal in the final seconds that would have kept hope alive. There isn't going to be a Super Harbaugh Bowl in the backyard of the evil Indianapolis Colts or a rematch of the 2001 Super Bowl that has been the Ravens' calling card for too many years now. Owner Steve Bisciotti will to have to wait at least another 12 months to light up a big fat cigar and hoist his very own Lombardi Trophy.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
They are as well-versed in 3-D printing, weaving and the anthropology of fashion as they are in classic looks from Chanel and Dior. Students in the Maryland Institute College of Art s fibers program approach fashion from an unusual perspective. Although the college does not offer a traditional fashion design curriculum, graduates are creating inventive garments informed by education rooted in a sensual - and intellectual - understanding of textiles. "Fashion is a cultural force that relates to how we communicate ideas, values, fears and aspirations, our sense of belonging, and our ideas around gender and class," said fibers department chair Valeska Populoh.
NEWS
December 25, 2004
The Perspective section will not be published in Sunday's editions but will return next week. The Public Editor column will not appear; however, the Sunday crossword puzzles and games will be found in Arts & Society. The Editorial page and Opinion/Commentary page, which will include reader responses to KAL's "What's My Line contest," will be in the A section of the Sunday editions.
TOPIC
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2005
BEING the editor of the Perspective section of The Sun was the best job I ever had on the paper. Why? Maybe because during the three years I put out the section, I learned something about the truly venerable newspaper I devoted 32 years of my life to, and something about myself. When I returned in 1975 after three years as The Sun's correspondent in Brazil, I wanted to go back to my job on The Evening Sun's editorial page. The managing editor of The Sun, Paul Banker, wanted me in the Washington bureau.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
As one who came to America from a socialist country at the age of 18, I find it terrifying that elected officials would challenge the legitimacy of rights granted by our Constitution. When I moved here those many years ago, I was promised my freedom by a Bill of Rights unlike any document ever written previously. It was a liberating experience. Yet today, I once again feel threatened and intimidated by my government. I implore our elected officials to put emotion aside and ponder the consequences of restricting people's right to own guns.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | October 15, 2008
The presidential candidacy of Sen. Barack Obama has already inspired several in-depth explorations of race, ranging from CNN's Black in America documentary in July to Ted Koppel's report The Last Lynching, which aired on Discovery Monday. Tonight on Comedy Central comes a new sketch magazine comedy series, Chocolate News. Created by and starring David Alan Grier, it's a no-holds-barred exploration of contemporary life from a distinctly African-American perspective. As Grier himself describes it at the start of the pilot, "Welcome to the Chocolate News, the only source of pure, uncircumcised realness from an Afro-centric perspective."
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | January 5, 2003
LAST SUNDAY in this section, the page opposite the editorial page was devoted to biographies of the editors and writers and support staff who produce the editorial and op-ed pages. Inasmuch as those two pages appear each Sunday in Perspective, some have wondered why nothing was said about the Perspective staff. Are we hiding? No. This offered an opportunity to explain the difference between the two - why some Sundays the editorial page may praise the governor as a genius while a Perspective piece argues he is an imbecile.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | September 30, 2013
Editor: Reading the Wednesday issue of The Aegis (9/23/2013) the letter written by Alison Prost was highly expected, as she missed so many points, namely one that most of the Chesapeake Bay's pollution is filtering down from points north like Pennsylvania, which continues to heavily pollute the Susquehanna River Basin as well the other states that pour heavy pollution into the Potomac River. Please note that both the Susquehanna and the Potomac flow into the Bay so Maryland is entirely responsible for not even 30 percent of the pollution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ellen Fishel and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
My story isn't all that groundbreaking. I'm 23, officially a year removed from the University of Maryland-College Park and walking that ever-shaky line between being a functional adult and an irresponsible mess. It's a story you've heard many times before (probably in some form of Internet listicle). And it's also one that many of you are probably experiencing right now, or at least can remember when you were. My column will try to shed light on what being in this awkward half-stage of life really means.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
College athletic coaches continue to dominate the upper ranks of Maryland's public salary structure, with University of Maryland men's basketball coach Mark Turgeon, football coach Randy Edsall and women's basketball coach Brenda Frese ranking as the state's three highest-paid employees. The Baltimore Sun updated its salary database with 2013 data on Wednesday. Beyond those big three, football and basketball coaches rank among the highest-paid employees at other state universities such as Towson, Morgan State and Coppin State.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Loyola Maryland, the No. 3 seed in the NCAA men's lacrosse tournament, has the honor of opening the postseason by facing Albany on Saturday at noon at Ridley Athletic Complex in Baltimore. And that's a good thing for Greyhounds coach Charley Toomey. “It drives me crazy to walk into our locker room and seeing the guys sitting on a couch and watching another game,” he said on Tuesday. “For [Great Danes coach] Scott [Marr], I'm sure that sitting in a hotel and having the guys watch another game, as a coach, that drives you nuts.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The McCormick Unsung Heroes Awards Banquet holds a special place in Poly girls basketball coach Kendall Peace-Able's heart. Not only has she been to the banquet 11 times as a coach with her team's nominee, but in her senior year at Poly, Peace-Able was a candidate for the award that honors unsung heroes on football and girls basketball teams from Baltimore City and Baltimore County public, private and parochial high schools. "It's their shining moment," Peace-Able said.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | April 14, 2014
Two very different perspectives on urban life are on view in the exhibit "The City: Paintings by Robert Tennenbaum and Linda Press" at Howard Community College's Rouse Company Foundation Gallery. Tennenbaum's aerial views of various cities are from so high up in the sky that it's way beyond where birds fly and closer to what a satellite would photograph. The precise height does not really matter, though, because these are highly schematic depictions that abstractly treat a city's layout in terms of blue lines for rivers, a black-lined grid for city streets, and patches of green for parks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Edgar Allan Poe was a pretty open-minded guy. "I do not believe that any thought, properly so called," he once said, "is out of the reach of language. " So this Baltimore favorite son presumably would have been cool with the "Homo Poe Show," which started as a single thought - Is there a way to see Poe through a gay lens? - and resulted in enough provocative language to launch an evening-length collection of four short theater works. It's the brainchild of Steven J. Satta, founding member and artistic director of Iron Crow Theatre Company, a Baltimore troupe that emphasizes works with lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender perspectives.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 15, 2006
I truly love those rare occasions when sports becomes something much bigger than a game, when the boundary lines between the playing field and our everyday lives blur. And I truly hate when it's artificial, when we assign profound meaning to something that simply defies logic or explanation, pretending sports is the framework when it's really just faint background noise. That's why it was so laughable to hear ad nauseam last week that when New York Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle's plane crashed into a Manhattan high-rise, we were suddenly given this sharpened sense of understanding, that the death of a major league pitcher was what we all really needed to put sports into proper perspective.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Within months after leaving Maryland as a junior in the spring of 2005, John Gilchrist realized he had made a mistake. Sitting in his apartment in Rishon LeZion, a coastal town in Israel where he had begun what would become a nomadic professional basketball career, Gilchrist wrote an email apologizing to his former coach, Gary Williams, and to former Terps assistant Dave Dickerson, by then the head coach at Tulane. "I just basically poured my guts out to them," Gilchrist recalled on a trip back to College Park last month.
NEWS
January 23, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley's first State of the State address, delivered seven years ago, gave little hint of the sweeping changes that would take place in Maryland by the time he returned to the House of Delegates' rostrum today for his final such speech. The main take-away of that speech in 2007 was the new governor's promise to restore cooperation and civility in a state capital that had seen notable deficits of both during the period of divided government ushered in by his predecessor, Republican Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. After watching the legislature give Mr. O'Malley everything he wanted for seven years, and vice versa, that concern seems quaint.
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