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Personnel System

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NEWS
April 25, 1994
The Annapolis City Council will meet tonight to discuss a study of the city's personnel system.A committee has been studying the municipal employment system since August.The study was sparked by a previous report that was rejected because it called for large raises for department heads.The new study recommends updating job descriptions, requiring management training, reducing the number of contract employees and expanding the duties of the civil service board.Tonight's meeting will be at 7:30 at City Hall.
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NEWS
October 11, 2006
One month before a closely contested gubernatorial election is not the ideal time to discuss serious reform of the state personnel system, but the opportunity has presented itself nonetheless. A 135-page draft report released this week by the legislative committee investigating the Ehrlich administration's personnel practices makes a pretty damning case against the governor. But it's also a familiar one by now - and so the report is unlikely to move voters one way or the other. If anything, the timing of the document's release may even generate sympathy for Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and his view that the investigation has been little more than a political smear.
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NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1996
Using a variety of weapons -- from a paid consultant to a proposed change in the Howard County charter -- Republican officials are taking aim at how the county hires, fires and pays its workers."
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
A federal appeals court struck down proposed labor relations rules at the Department of Homeland Security yesterday, calling them "utterly unreasonable" and dealing another setback to President Bush's efforts to overhaul the way the federal government manages its work force. Civil servants are closely monitoring the case to learn how much leeway the courts will give managers over firings, pay raises and union contracts. The outcome is likely to set the standard for reforms at other agencies, including the largest, the Department of Defense, where an appeals court ruling on similar changes that would affect hundreds of thousands of workers is awaited.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1997
Sweeping changes in the way Howard County's employees are classified, evaluated and paid are likely to be introduced to the County Council in time to be included in the budget that takes effect in July.County Executive Charles I. Ecker, a Republican, plans to make a series of proposals in March to revamp the personnel system, he told the council yesterday.The changes, along with the budget, are likely to dominate council business in March, April and perhaps May. The new fiscal year starts July 1.Ecker hopes to tie wages to performance evaluations while also taking steps to see that Howard's 1,800 employees earn salaries similar to their counterparts in other counties and the private sector.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | October 4, 1991
Last year, the Maryland Port Administration gave mechanical engineer Joseph P. Sisolak Jr. a certificate of commendation and a $500 check for outstanding performance. Last week, the port agency gave Mr. Sisolak a layoff notice.He says his layoff is unjust, that MPA managers included him among the cuts because of his age and health. And the circumstances of Mr. Sisolak's layoff help illustrate some of the problems at an agency whose difficulties are more than just financial.Rank and file employees, union officials and even the top officials of the agency agree that the personnel system at the agency has been very seriously mismanaged in the past few years.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1996
The Republican fight to overhaul Howard County's personnel system has an unlikely new savior: Democratic Councilwoman Mary C. Lorsung.With the support of local public employee unions, the west Columbia council member offered a compromise yesterday on a Republican plan to write more flexibility into the personnel section of the county's charter.Her compromise would preserve the right of employees to appeal unfavorable job reviews. It also would preserve the right of union employees to settle disputes through binding arbitration.
NEWS
June 10, 1997
THE BEST THING about Howard County's controversial personnel report is that its recommendations are not final.The document, put together by the San Diego-based Organizational Consulting Center, will undergo a review by the County Council, which began its discussions yesterday.The report should prove valuable as Howard County tries to define job positions more clearly and set salaries for its 1,850 employees.Consultants would reduce the number of classes from 381 to 160; pay wages that are comparable to what workers in similar public sector jobs earn, and give financial incentives for employees to excel and to devise ideas to save money.
NEWS
June 13, 2005
MEMBERS OF the General Assembly are expected to soon finalize plans for an investigation into the Ehrlich administration's personnel practices. Within the State House, this is a topic of great interest. The inquiry was sparked by the now-infamous Joseph F. Steffen Jr.'s alleged role as a hatchetman lopping off the politically undesirable from state service. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. insists he is wholly innocent of ethical misconduct in this regard. As far as any investigation goes, the governor is fond of telling reporters, "Bring it on."
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1997
Stung by their inability to stop a personnel overhaul hated by many employees, Howard County union leaders have already begun working to elect a more labor-friendly County Council in 1998.Forty labor leaders from around the region met at an Ellicott City restaurant on July 17 -- when it had become clear that the current council would pass the personnel plan a week later -- to stitch together a coalition dedicated to influencing the 1998 election."We think we can influence 40,000 votes in Howard County," said Dale Chase, president of the local chapter of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, which represents the county's blue-collar workers.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | January 22, 2006
The Department of Defense has again pushed back and downsized the start of its new personnel system that wipes out guaranteed raises in favor of pay based on performance reviews from managers. The first group of civilian employees at the Defense Department will make the transition to the National Security Personnel System, or NSPS, April 30 with the first performance-based payout in January. That group has been whittled to about 11,000 workers from about 65,370. "They couldn't have done this worse," said Paul Light, a professor of public service at New York University.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | January 20, 2006
The Department of Defense has again pushed back and downsized the start of its new personnel system that wipes out guaranteed raises in favor of pay based on performance reviews from managers. The first group of civilian employees at the Defense Department will make the transition to the National Security Personnel System, or NSPS, April 30 with the first performance-based payout in January. That group has been whittled to about 11,000 workers from about 65,370. "They couldn't have done this worse," said Paul Light, a professor of public service at New York University.
NEWS
June 13, 2005
MEMBERS OF the General Assembly are expected to soon finalize plans for an investigation into the Ehrlich administration's personnel practices. Within the State House, this is a topic of great interest. The inquiry was sparked by the now-infamous Joseph F. Steffen Jr.'s alleged role as a hatchetman lopping off the politically undesirable from state service. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. insists he is wholly innocent of ethical misconduct in this regard. As far as any investigation goes, the governor is fond of telling reporters, "Bring it on."
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2005
The fired personnel chief for the state transportation department urged Maryland lawmakers yesterday to investigate the Ehrlich administration's hiring practices, saying political staffers have established a parallel hiring system that dispenses jobs and salary increases to favored appointees while wrecking morale of career employees. "There is, in fact, a `shadow government' operating outside of the state personnel system which is operating to terminate career professionals, and fill those positions with their own candidates," said George W. Casey in a detailed six-page letter to Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch.
NEWS
July 27, 2001
BALTIMORE'S new personnel director, Elliott L. Wheelan Jr., may or may not be a wizard in his field. One thing is certain. This career bureaucrat created precious little news as the District of Columbia's personnel chief from 1997 to 1998 and during a three-year stint in Kansas City, Mo. As Baltimore's personnel chief, though, he should make news. After all, he will be the point person in revamping the city's personnel system, which was called "outdated, expensive and inefficient" in a recent report by the Greater Baltimore Committee and the Presidents' Roundtable.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1998
When Maryland Department of Transportation employee Ken Kline put his thinking cap on recently, he devised a plan that saved taxpayers $6.9 million and earned a $20,000 thank you from the state in return.Kline, a financial analyst who specializes in technology, found a way to upgrade the existing human resources personnel system in time for the year 2000 that eliminated the need to buy a new software package.On yesterday, Kline and two other state employees received checks from Gov. Parris N. Glendening through the Governor's Award Program, which rewards state employees for innovative ideas.
NEWS
April 17, 1996
STATE LEGISLATORS took a major step this week to give 70,000 state workers a reason to excel at their jobs. In future years, pay raises will be linked to performance and the ability of divisions to exceed expectations. No more uniform pay increases that reward indolent, non-productive employees as much as hard-working colleagues.This could create a sea change in attitudes and efficiency. State government's personnel system will begin to resemble the private sector's, where performance, not longevity, determines salary increases.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1997
Stung by their inability to stop a personnel overhaul hated by many employees, Howard County union leaders have already begun working to elect a more labor-friendly County Council in 1998.Forty labor leaders from around the region met at an Ellicott City restaurant on July 17 -- when it had become clear that the current council would pass the personnel plan a week later -- to stitch together a coalition dedicated to influencing the 1998 election."We think we can influence 40,000 votes in Howard County," said Dale Chase, president of the local chapter of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, which represents the county's blue-collar workers.
NEWS
June 10, 1997
THE BEST THING about Howard County's controversial personnel report is that its recommendations are not final.The document, put together by the San Diego-based Organizational Consulting Center, will undergo a review by the County Council, which began its discussions yesterday.The report should prove valuable as Howard County tries to define job positions more clearly and set salaries for its 1,850 employees.Consultants would reduce the number of classes from 381 to 160; pay wages that are comparable to what workers in similar public sector jobs earn, and give financial incentives for employees to excel and to devise ideas to save money.
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