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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Tina Bahadori says a career at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has given her the chance to achieve something that 25 years in the private sector didn't offer: a legacy. Bahadori's years working for consulting, advocacy and lobbying firms brought her success and money. But as national program director for the EPA's chemical safety and sustainability research, she says, she's effecting change. "There is nothing more rewarding and legacy-building as a scientist who works in the environmental and public health arena," said Bahadori, a chemical and combustion engineer with degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
Paul Mincarelli has been trying for three years to get into international work for the federal government. He says he knows the odds are stacked against him. Now the competition is likely to get more intense. Some agencies have begun to limit the number of applications they accept per vacancy. Instead of setting a deadline for applications, some job announcements stay open only until the limit - in some cases as few as 25 resumes - is reached. Mincarelli, 26, has a master's degree in international affairs.
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NEWS
February 16, 2003
The Edgewood Chemical Biological Center is offering seminars for federal executives addressing responses to a chemical or biological terrorist attack. After the terrorist attacks of September 2001, many officials said they lacked knowledge about chemical and biological agents. The Edgewood seminars will provide an introduction to chemical and biological weapons and their implications, including signs and symptoms, appropriate response and the responsibilities of management personnel. The seminars also cover building management, consequence management, infrastructure, legal issues, health care and personnel management after an incident.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Latinos have for years made up one of the largest and fastest-growing groups in the country. They have also long been one of the most underrepresented minority groups in the federal workplace. Now a new effort is underway - at the highest level of federal hiring - to address that disparity. "There is tremendous growth, as you know, in the Latino community, and we see more and more young people graduating from university, and I really want to tap into those numbers," said Katherine Archuleta, the director of the federal Office of Personnel Management.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | June 26, 1992
The U.S. Office of Personnel Management has become the latest federal agency to capitalize on the depressed commercial real estate market, signing a 10-year lease for 14,542 square feet of office space at the Marsh & McLennan building at 300 W. Pratt St.The agency's local office will be moving out of the Garmatz Federal Courthouse, along with other agencies, to make room for an expansion of the space devoted to courts.John Thompson, a spokesman in Philadelphia for the General Services Administration, which handles real estate leasing for other federal agencies, said the personnel agency will move to its new quarters in July.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2006
These events are scheduled at the Baltimore Convention Center, Howard and Pratt streets: Black Engineers Awards -- and meeting. Estimated attendance: 5,000. Contact number: 410-244-7101, ext. 101. Feb. 17 Sister-to-Sister National Heart Day -- event. Estimated attendance: 3,000. Contact number: 410-986-1300. Feb. 21-26 Baltimore Fine Crafts Show. -- Estimated attendance: 35,000+. Contact number: 860-632-8456. Feb. 23-26 Maryland Music Educators -- session. Estimated attendance: 3,000.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Federal offices in the Washington, D.C., area will be closed Thursday due to the snow storm, the Office of Personnel Management announced. Emergency and telework-ready employees required to work must follow their agency's policies, including written telework agreements, the office said in a release. Non-emergency employees including those on pre-approved paid leave will be given an excused absence for the day, except those required to telework, on official travel outside of the area, on leave without pay or on an alternate work schedule day off. Telework-ready employees scheduled to work Thursday should follow their agency's policies and procedures, the release said.
NEWS
May 10, 1991
Chuck Ecker's appointment of Joanne Nelson as Howard County's new personnel director raises serious questions, once again, about the executive's vision of local government.Nelson, who took office May 1, will be responsible for running the county's personnel system -- including job classification, benefits programs and labor relations. So critical is the post that the county code specifies the person who holds it must have six years of "increasingly responsible experience in personnel management" as well as a "comprehensive knowledge of principles and practices of public personnel management."
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | January 28, 1994
An article in yesterday's Sun should have said that the Office of Personnel Management expects to save $3 million by phasing out the Federal Personnel Manual.The Sun regrets the error.WASHINGTON -- It was a strange funeral.Two fifes and a drum played patriotic ditties. Red, white and blue bunting festooned a nearby podium. Multicolored balloons bobbed in the background. Cheers and laughter punctuated the eulogy.So went the last day of life for a fat, 50-year-old veteran of Uncle Sam's personnel office known as "FPM" -- short for the Federal Personnel Manual.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | May 1, 1991
A Howard County councilman is asking for a legal opinion on whether the newly appointed personnel director, a close friend of the county executive's campaign manager, is qualified for the job.Councilman Paul R. Farragut, D-4th, said he was concerned about whether Joanne T. Nelson, a former vice president with Equitable Bank, met the qualifications spelled out in the county code."
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Women who work for the federal government, on the whole, make less than their male co-workers - just as in the private sector. But among the federal workers , a new study shows, that earnings gap is narrowing. Between 1992 and 2012, according to the Office of Personnel Management, the difference between earnings for men and women shrank from 30 percent to 13 percent. On orders from President Barack Obama, the Office of Personnel Management reviewed salary data from 1992, 2002 and 2012 and looked at ways to reduce the gap. The study, "Governmentwide Strategy on Advancing Pay Equality in the Federal Government," was released this month.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Tina Bahadori says a career at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has given her the chance to achieve something that 25 years in the private sector didn't offer: a legacy. Bahadori's years working for consulting, advocacy and lobbying firms brought her success and money. But as national program director for the EPA's chemical safety and sustainability research, she says, she's effecting change. "There is nothing more rewarding and legacy-building as a scientist who works in the environmental and public health arena," said Bahadori, a chemical and combustion engineer with degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Federal offices in the Washington, D.C., area will be closed Thursday due to the snow storm, the Office of Personnel Management announced. Emergency and telework-ready employees required to work must follow their agency's policies, including written telework agreements, the office said in a release. Non-emergency employees including those on pre-approved paid leave will be given an excused absence for the day, except those required to telework, on official travel outside of the area, on leave without pay or on an alternate work schedule day off. Telework-ready employees scheduled to work Thursday should follow their agency's policies and procedures, the release said.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
With her seeing-eye dog by her side, Denna Lambert works to help ensure that up-and-coming scientists and engineers with disabilities can see a future at NASA. Lambert, the disability program manager at Goddard Space Flight Center, said she is answering President Barack Obama's call for greater diversity and inclusion in the federal government. When children, teens and young adults see more and more professionals with disabilities in the federal workforce, she said, they will know what they can achieve — and how they can contribute.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
When Greg Ham first became eligible to work from home under a new program at the Environmental Protection Agency a few years ago, he didn't jump at the chance. "I wanted home to be separate from work," said Ham, 57, who lives in Baltimore but works as an environmental cleanup coordinator at the EPA's Environmental Science Center at Fort Meade. Management was promoting telework. And when Ham's field work began to decline and his office work picked up, he decided to give it a shot - and found cutting nearly two hours of commuting out of his daily routine "a real nice timesaver.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
For the past year, the Office of Personnel Management has been working on regulations that will allow older federal workers to phase into retirement. The idea is that these employees would continue to work part time, collect a partial pension — and pass on their knowledge and experience to the next generation of federal workers . Many older workers are eagerly awaiting the program's launch. "A lot of retirement-eligible workers don't feel ready to retire," said Jessica Klement, legislative director of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
Federal government offices in the Washington D.C. area will open with an 11 a.m. "delayed arrival" Monday, after a freezing rain advisory predicted slick roads and icy conditions throughout Maryland and the District. Non-emergency employees have the option to take unscheduled leave or "telework," according to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. Emergency employees must report as scheduled. "Light icing on roadways and elevated surfaces will make traveling hazardous," according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which issued the weather advisory about 1:30 p.m. Sunday; it remains in effect into Monday morning.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
More than 500 civilian workers at Fort Meade will receive furlough notices over the next week, base officials said Wednesday. Supervisors and managers plan to hand deliver notices to more than 425 garrison employees by June 4. The notices describe plans for one furlough day per week from July 8 through Sept. 30. The Office of Personnel Management requires 30 days' notice before placing employees on temporary non-duty, non-pay status. "We thought it important that supervisors and managers hand deliver the notices to ensure every employee received them and had a chance to ask questions," said John Moeller, deputy garrison commander at the Army base in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
As thousands of federal workers prepare to be furloughed, many are concerned about how to deal with a pay cut. Keith Everett, a chief steward with the American Federation of Government Employees, said his union held two meetings in recent weeks at Fort Meade for workers, many of whom had the same financial questions: Can I apply for unemployment benefits? Will I receive back pay if lawmakers eventually reach some agreement on budget cuts? The answers: No and no. "Everyone is hoping [lawmakers]
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