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Personality Traits

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MOBILE
June 27, 2012
Call us what you want -- Millennials, Generation Y, Generation We -- it doesn't change the reality that most of us grew up just as one era ended and another began. We're old enough to remember what life was like before high-speed Internet, but young enough to lead the digital revolution. In the meantime, we're dealing with our shortened attention spans, student debt and smartphone obsession. Photo galleries: 10 personality traits of the Millennial Generation Millennial Generation's 7 defining moments Movie quotes for the Millennial Generation Millennial Generation's TV idols
ARTICLES BY DATE
MOBILE
June 27, 2012
Call us what you want -- Millennials, Generation Y, Generation We -- it doesn't change the reality that most of us grew up just as one era ended and another began. We're old enough to remember what life was like before high-speed Internet, but young enough to lead the digital revolution. In the meantime, we're dealing with our shortened attention spans, student debt and smartphone obsession. Photo galleries: 10 personality traits of the Millennial Generation Millennial Generation's 7 defining moments Movie quotes for the Millennial Generation Millennial Generation's TV idols
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NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2005
Is there such a thing as a cancer-prone personality? The answer is an emphatic no, according to Swedish and Danish researchers who conducted a study that was recently published online by the journal Cancer. The idea that some people might have an increased risk of cancer - perhaps those who are extroverted, emotionally contained or who have aggressive, Type A personalities - has been an insidious, blame-the-victim kind of notion for decades. And some studies have suggested a link between personality traits and cancer.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | July 7, 2009
Former NFL quarterback Steve McNair left this world under tawdry circumstances, which might help some people come to grips with another senseless, violent death, but you know it's not as simple as somebody just being in the wrong place at the wrong time doing the wrong thing. Whatever his sins were, he has surely paid a greater price for them than most, which makes this less of a lesson in morality than another cautionary tale about the perils of wealth and fame. Why do so many big-time athletes and big-time celebrities get themselves into situations that end tragically?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chicago Tribune | September 24, 2000
You've got to hand it to William Chaplin. His psychology students at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa asked him if people can actually form lasting opinions about people's personalities through a simple handshake. He didn't know the answer -- so Chaplin suggested his students design a research study about handshakes to find out. The proposed study, co-authored by Chaplin and four undergraduates, was published in a recent issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.
NEWS
By Booth Moore and Booth Moore,Los Angeles Times | July 11, 1999
What does Hillary Rodham Clinton's face say about who she is? Naomi Tickle can tell you. A practicing personologist, she believes human behavior and personality traits are related to physical structure."
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2006
Are you a forty-something grouch who's first to shout invectives in a slow-moving checkout lane? A youngster who mocks your dad's wise counsel? A graduate student known for driving the renowned professor crazy with sardonic verbiage? Take hope: Today, you might be dismissed as a smart-aleck. In your old age, you might be viewed as smarter than average. Or at least that's what Morgan State psychology professor Jacqueline Bichsel suggests. She recently co-authored a study that invites the conclusion that upon reaching 60, disagreeable people maintain a higher level of intelligence than more easy-going seniors.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | July 7, 2009
Former NFL quarterback Steve McNair left this world under tawdry circumstances, which might help some people come to grips with another senseless, violent death, but you know it's not as simple as somebody just being in the wrong place at the wrong time doing the wrong thing. Whatever his sins were, he has surely paid a greater price for them than most, which makes this less of a lesson in morality than another cautionary tale about the perils of wealth and fame. Why do so many big-time athletes and big-time celebrities get themselves into situations that end tragically?
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 21, 2004
WHEN MING Tsai roasts a duck, he saves the fat. A spoonful of duck fat adds terrific flavor to scrambled eggs or to stir-fry dishes, he said. Salvaging the duck fat is also illustrative of the attitude he grew up with, a waste-not want-not mind-set he described as "very Chinese." "You get everything you can out of that duck," he said. "You get the maximum benefit for all the time it took to cook the duck, for the pot you dirtied, for the stove you heated." After spending an afternoon with Ming - chef, cookbook author, owner of the widely acclaimed Blue Ginger restaurant outside Boston and host of a number of TV cooking shows - I came away with the impression that he, like his cooking, is a smart assimilation of East and West.
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 30, 2006
YEARS BEFORE THE BOOM OF the Internet and reality TV, major pop stars maintained a certain mystique. If your love for them ran deep, you joined a fan club. Through snail mail, you received information about tours and album releases, and deals on rare posters and T-shirts. Perhaps you learned "personal" details about the artists in the fan club newsletter: the name of the high school Pat Benatar attended, the astrological personality traits of each member of New Edition, the brand of lipstick Boy George prefers.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2006
Are you a forty-something grouch who's first to shout invectives in a slow-moving checkout lane? A youngster who mocks your dad's wise counsel? A graduate student known for driving the renowned professor crazy with sardonic verbiage? Take hope: Today, you might be dismissed as a smart-aleck. In your old age, you might be viewed as smarter than average. Or at least that's what Morgan State psychology professor Jacqueline Bichsel suggests. She recently co-authored a study that invites the conclusion that upon reaching 60, disagreeable people maintain a higher level of intelligence than more easy-going seniors.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2005
Is there such a thing as a cancer-prone personality? The answer is an emphatic no, according to Swedish and Danish researchers who conducted a study that was recently published online by the journal Cancer. The idea that some people might have an increased risk of cancer - perhaps those who are extroverted, emotionally contained or who have aggressive, Type A personalities - has been an insidious, blame-the-victim kind of notion for decades. And some studies have suggested a link between personality traits and cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chicago Tribune | September 24, 2000
You've got to hand it to William Chaplin. His psychology students at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa asked him if people can actually form lasting opinions about people's personalities through a simple handshake. He didn't know the answer -- so Chaplin suggested his students design a research study about handshakes to find out. The proposed study, co-authored by Chaplin and four undergraduates, was published in a recent issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.
NEWS
By Booth Moore and Booth Moore,Los Angeles Times | July 11, 1999
What does Hillary Rodham Clinton's face say about who she is? Naomi Tickle can tell you. A practicing personologist, she believes human behavior and personality traits are related to physical structure."
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | February 9, 2000
Valentine mints for tender moments Pucker up for Cupid this Valentine's Day with a Tic Tac Valentine's Day Gift Box -- a five-pack of red-and-white breath mints. The set, which retails for around $2.49, offers Cinnamon to spice things up and Fresh Mint to cool things down. Dating and snacks Maybe you've been looking for love in all the wrong places. A recent study on snack-food preferences reveals that people's snack choices reflect personality traits, so you should date people whose snack habits are compatible with yours.
FEATURES
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,Newsday | June 14, 1993
No matter how tear-resistant you may think you are, it will take superhuman effort to avoid a swelling in the throat when reading the last chapter of this brave and beautiful book. It is a letter Arthur Ashe wrote to his 6-year-old daughter, Camera, on Inauguration Day this year, saying, at the outset, that "by the time you read this letter . . . I may not be around to discuss with you what I have written here."Little more than two weeks later, Ashe, the greatest African-American tennis player in history, died, at 49, of pneumonia brought about by the AIDS virus.
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