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November 11, 2008
Former Raven sentenced in fatal hit-and-run in '07 A former Baltimore Ravens player was sentenced yesterday to six months in jail in a fatal hit-and-run accident last year in Joppa, according to the Harford County state's attorney. Javin E. Hunter, 28, of Orchard Park, Mich., was sentenced to five years in prison, with all but six months suspended, after pleading guilty to charges stemming from the July 17, 2007, accident, said prosecutor Joseph I. Cassilly. Police said Hunter left the scene after the Chrysler 300 he was driving struck a 53-year-old White Marsh man riding a motorized scooter on U.S. 40 near Joppa Road.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2010
Despite persistent questioning from a defense attorney, a psychiatrist stuck Friday to his conviction that a woman accused of killing her husband last year was not delusional and even took steps to cover up the crime. Dr. David Moulton, who examined the defendant, Mary C. Koontz, while she was being held at the maximum-security Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center in Jessup, said she has a severe personality disorder and other afflictions, and yet is capable of understanding her actions and their consequences.
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NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1998
A Potomac psychiatrist who treated Ruthann Aron altered his testimony yesterday, saying she suffers from bipolar manic depression in addition to the personality disorder he described during her first trial in March.Asked by prosecutors why he did not disclose that diagnosis earlier, Dr. Alan Brody said, "I wasn't asked."The combination of the two disorders can create severe psychiatric problems because manic depression can be further exaggerated by the personality disorder, he testified.Aron, 55, a Potomac developer who was a candidate for the U.S. Senate in 1994, has pleaded not criminally responsible to two counts of solicitation to commit murder.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Lloyd and Robert Lloyd,Los Angeles Times | January 18, 2009
The family comedy has undergone some transformations of late, thanks mostly to cable television and its restless search for buttons and/or envelopes to push. United States of Tara, a new Showtime series about a woman with four personalities (including her "own"), is solidly within this new tradition, alongside shows like Weeds, The Riches and Big Love - stories of families whose unusual lives or lifestyles set them apart from the supposedly normal world, which we are typically invited to see as grotesque.
NEWS
By George F. Will | April 4, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Compassionate government has recently rained new rights and entitlements so rapidly that you may have missed this beauty:You have a right to be a colossally obnoxious jerk on the job.If you are just slightly offensive, your right will not kick in. But if you are seriously insufferable to colleagues at work, you have a right not to be fired, and you are entitled to have your employer make reasonable accommodations for your ''disability.''...
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1998
A federal judge sentenced a noted Maryland con artist to 27 months in prison yesterday, describing her as a woman of "unnatural material craving" who bilked a fortune to buy jewels, Rolls Royces and a $1.5 million condominium.Deborah S. Kolodner, 42, admitted in U.S. District Court inBaltimore that her fascination with wealth reached such an extreme that she once bought 20 pairs of shoes in a day and 50 dress suits in a month."Material things appeared to bring attention and acceptance in a fantasy world," Kolodner said in a written statement to Judge Benson E. Legg.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2010
Despite persistent questioning from a defense attorney, a psychiatrist stuck Friday to his conviction that a woman accused of killing her husband last year was not delusional and even took steps to cover up the crime. Dr. David Moulton, who examined the defendant, Mary C. Koontz, while she was being held at the maximum-security Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center in Jessup, said she has a severe personality disorder and other afflictions, and yet is capable of understanding her actions and their consequences.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | February 15, 1992
A Forest Hill man faces up to 65 years in prison after his conviction yesterday on charges of sexually abusing his 11-year-old daughter, who was permitted to testify even though she had been diagnosed as having multiple personality disorder.The 55-year-old man, whose name is being withheld to protect the girl, was found guilty of child abuse, sodomy, unnatural and perverted sexual practices, and second- and third-degree sex offenses.He is to be sentenced in Harford County Circuit Court on April 15.The victim testified Wednesday that her father repeatedly fondled her and forced her to have oral and anal sex with him between April 1989 and October 1990.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | May 6, 1994
A man with a history of more than 30 years of sexual offenses and mental disorders was held criminally responsible yesterday in an attack on a woman in her Guilford home last summer.Thurman Alexander Moore, 47, could be sentenced to life in prison without parole for the Aug. 31 attack. He had pleaded guilty but not criminally responsible by reason of insanity.Howard Circuit Judge Cornelius Sybert Jr. issued a ruling yesterday, saying that attorneys for Moore did not meet the burden of showing that Moore's disorders were so severe that he couldn't obey the law on the day of the incident.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
A forensic psychiatrist yesterday characterized Ruthann Aron as a Scarlett O'Hara, who repeatedly considered the risks of getting caught as she contracted for her husband's murder, only to "think about it tomorrow" and go forward anyway.Dr. Christiane Tellefsen, who examined Aron last fall at Clifton T. Perkins Hospital, disputed testimony from defense doctors who described the Potomac developer's actions as purposefully self-destructive and a sign of mental illness."I found evidence that she was trying hard not to get caught," Tellefsen testified yesterday in Montgomery County Circuit Court.
NEWS
November 11, 2008
Former Raven sentenced in fatal hit-and-run in '07 A former Baltimore Ravens player was sentenced yesterday to six months in jail in a fatal hit-and-run accident last year in Joppa, according to the Harford County state's attorney. Javin E. Hunter, 28, of Orchard Park, Mich., was sentenced to five years in prison, with all but six months suspended, after pleading guilty to charges stemming from the July 17, 2007, accident, said prosecutor Joseph I. Cassilly. Police said Hunter left the scene after the Chrysler 300 he was driving struck a 53-year-old White Marsh man riding a motorized scooter on U.S. 40 near Joppa Road.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | January 13, 2006
Grieving used to be seen as a very straightforward process: You cried at the funeral. You were sad for a few months. Then you had some "closure" and got on with your life. Psychologists - both pop and professional - thought that anyone who didn't cry at the funeral or was still crying a year later was either heartless or overly emotional. But, mercifully, the emerging view among mental health experts is that grieving for a lost loved one is really a disorderly, highly idiosyncratic process - that there are no set stages to go through and no "normal" or "right" way to do it. For Lynn Osborn, 48, who lost her husband to Lou Gehrig's disease four years ago after a slow, awful decline, the grieving process "has been very personal, and it's still not over yet," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul McHugh and Paul McHugh,Special to the Sun | February 13, 2005
The Sociopath Next Door: The Ruthless Versus the Rest of Us By Martha Stout. Broadway Books. 256 pages. $24.95. The cover of this book blares out its alarmist message. "1 in 25 ordinary Americans secretly has no conscience and can do anything at all without feeling guilty. Who is the devil you know?" The psychotherapist author claims that 4 percent of Americans, by psychiatric criteria, have anti-social personality disorder (also known as sociopathy). She wants to warn us about them because, so she says, they are difficult to identify and, lacking an innate conscience, are dangerous to all. After my surprise beholding a therapist literally demonizing people who by her own definition are mentally ill, I noticed three telling credibility problems.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2003
A Howard Circuit Court judge found a 47-year-old Catonsville man not criminally responsible yesterday for shooting and seriously wounding a school custodian in an Ellicott City drugstore, and committed him indefinitely to a state mental institution. James M. Lane faced attempted first-degree murder and other charges in the shooting Aug. 2 of Robert Lee Jackson Jr., who is chief custodian at Mayfield Woods Middle School in Elkridge. "Psychiatrists will determine when -- if ever -- [Lane]
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
A forensic psychiatrist yesterday characterized Ruthann Aron as a Scarlett O'Hara, who repeatedly considered the risks of getting caught as she contracted for her husband's murder, only to "think about it tomorrow" and go forward anyway.Dr. Christiane Tellefsen, who examined Aron last fall at Clifton T. Perkins Hospital, disputed testimony from defense doctors who described the Potomac developer's actions as purposefully self-destructive and a sign of mental illness."I found evidence that she was trying hard not to get caught," Tellefsen testified yesterday in Montgomery County Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1998
Ruthann Aron described herself as a "confused mushball" who was led into the alleged plot to kill her husband last year, according to a psychologist who examined her last fall.But after listening to her words, reading her mental test results, and considering her motive, psychiatric history and behavior, Dr. Kevin Richards testified that he believed she knew exactly what she was doing."These were not disorganized activities," said Richards, a forensic psychologist at Clifton T. Perkins Hospital in Jessup.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1998
Ruthann Aron described herself as a "confused mushball" who was led into the alleged plot to kill her husband last year, according to a psychologist who examined her last fall.But after listening to her words, reading her mental test results, and considering her motive, psychiatric history and behavior, Dr. Kevin Richards testified that he believed she knew exactly what she was doing."These were not disorganized activities," said Richards, a forensic psychologist at Clifton T. Perkins Hospital in Jessup.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | October 15, 1991
THE BIG losers from the weekend's hearings were not Anita Hill, Judge Thomas or the Senate Judiciary Committee -- they were the country's department stores. The stores lost all their customers to the television hearings, and long after everyone else recovers, the retail merchants will still be counting the inventory people should have bought at the Columbus Day sales.If this country is going to ban Halcion, the popular sleeping pill, it has to ban Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah as well.As far as all politicians are concerned, sexual harassment has now replaced communism as the biggest issue this country faces.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1998
A Potomac psychiatrist who treated Ruthann Aron altered his testimony yesterday, saying she suffers from bipolar manic depression in addition to the personality disorder he described during her first trial in March.Asked by prosecutors why he did not disclose that diagnosis earlier, Dr. Alan Brody said, "I wasn't asked."The combination of the two disorders can create severe psychiatric problems because manic depression can be further exaggerated by the personality disorder, he testified.Aron, 55, a Potomac developer who was a candidate for the U.S. Senate in 1994, has pleaded not criminally responsible to two counts of solicitation to commit murder.
NEWS
By CAROL TAVIS | May 31, 1998
Carol Tavris' name was misspelled in the byline and credit line for an article on school violence that appeared Sunday in the Perspective section.The Sun regrets the errors.Oh, no, we say, reading the news with horror and helplessness, another teen-age boy on a murderous rampage. This time it's a 15-year-old in Oregon who allegedly killed his parents and two fellow students. We haven't recovered from the incident involving the 11- and 13-year-olds in Jonesboro, Ark., who are accused of killing a teacher and four students March 24.These acts of vengeful cruelty, occurring not in the mean big city but in close-knit small communities, are especially threatening to our sense of safety and order.
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