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By PETER BAKER | August 27, 1995
They are a fad of the young and the young at heart. They are relatively inexpensive, easy to trailer, launch and load. They can be extremely fast and exciting to operate.They are personal watercraft, and in the wrong hands they can be incredibly dangerous.Last week, a 13-year-old girl from Severna Park was killed near Kent Narrows when she fell from her personal watercraft and was run down by a second personal watercraft apparently following too closely.On June 17, on the Susquehanna River near Port Deposit, a woman was killed when her personal watercraft collided head-on with one operated by her husband.
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By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun and By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Liz Sweeney of Timonium used to race her kayak while living in New York City. At the time, Sweeney would practice in the Hudson River, though public access to waterways was hard to find. Now, she is able to get up early and take her kayak to Loch Raven Fishing Center in Baltimore County, as she did on a recent day. Although she no longer races, she still uses her kayak for exercise. Elsewhere at the fishing center that day, minutes after Sweeney got out of the water, Rick Warner of Carney came in on his fishing boat following a morning excursion.
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NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | July 3, 1994
OCEAN CITY -- July Fourth brings out the boaters, and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources reminds the users of "personal watercraft" -- Jet Skis -- to follow the rules for safe boating."
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2012
Rescuers, including the Coast Guard and other local police authorities, are searching for a man after his personal watercraft was found unattended in the Back River near Essex. The Coast Guard reported Harry Gillis, 47, of Baltimore, was missing. According to statement, the Coast Guard received a call at approximately 4 p.m. Tuesday from a man reporting that a blue personal watercraft had drifted to his pier with the keys in the ignition. Coast Guard crew used a boat and a helicopter in its search.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 20, 1995
McHENRY -- Tim Selby and his family head from Westminster to Western Maryland just about any weekend they can to spend time at a family cabin overlooking scenic Deep Creek Lake. And to glide around the lake on their Honda Seadoos, or "personal watercraft," as they're called these days.But as Mr. Selby and countless others here will tell you, their enjoyment of Maryland's largest lake is hindered by a 6-year-old regulation that bans personal watercraft on the Garrett County lake from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekends and holidays from Memorial Day to Labor Day.It's a regulation that watercraft fans are pushing the state Department of Natural Resources to rescind, while their opponents charge that these machines -- sometimes likened to motorcycles on water -- are noisy, nuisances and safety hazards.
NEWS
April 28, 1997
A 25-year-old Anne Arundel County man is in critical condition at Prince George's Hospital Center shock trauma unit after hitting his head on his personal watercraft Saturday afternoon on the Chesapeake Bay north of the Bay Bridge, Maryland Natural Resources Police said.Philip J. Martinez, of the 7300 block of S. Robin Court, Hanover, was on a personal watercraft on the bay just off Podickory Point near the mouth of the Magothy River when the accident occurred at 6: 17 p.m., police said. Martinez was jumping over the wake of a passing boat when he lost control of his watercraft, hit his head and fell unconscious, police said.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Mike Farabaugh and Bruce Reid and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writers | June 20, 1995
Maryland's first fatal accident involving personal watercraft prompted state officials to issue a warning yesterday: These immensely popular boats may look fun, but a rider can be maimed or killed in the blink of an eye.The boats, known by the brand names Jet Ski and Waverunner and costing an average of $5,700, maneuver well but can't be stopped quickly, especially when operated at the top speed of about 50 mph. They do not have any warning device such...
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1999
They're fast, they're fun to operate and they're driven by engines that are among the worst polluters on the water.Personal watercraft (PWCs) are under attack by environmental advocacy groups from the Izaak Walton League of America to the Blue Water Network, a coalition of environmental organizations on the West Coast.San Juan County, Wash., an archipelago in Puget Sound just south of the Canadian border, has banned PWCs from its waters.The National Park Service has banned PWCs from many of its parks, and the Environmental Protection Agency has ordered manufacturers to reduce polluting emissions by 70 percent by 2008.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1997
Alarmed by four personal watercraft accidents that hospitalized four people in less than 48 hours this week on Middle and Back rivers, state and county authorities yesterday renewed a campaign for safe operation of the popular, high-powered craft."
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | November 26, 1999
In an informal agreement reached after almost a year of negotiations, the nation's manufacturers of personal watercraft have agreed to cap the speed of their controversial but highly popular products at 65 mph.The craft continue to be involved in a disproportionate number of accidents, and the Coast Guard has pressed since January for an industrywide speed limit on all new models. The agency hinted it might hold up regulatory approval of some model designs if the industry did not agree.The manufacturers have several motivations for agreeing to the pact.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | December 29, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - If Navy is so concerned about the size of the New Mexico defensive line, the key to victory in tomorrow's Emerald Bowl is just a few miles up the freeway. There's this lab over in Burlingame, Calif., where they can do something to level the playing field. That's not funny, of course, but the proximity of Navy's bowl game to the infamous BALCO scandal simply amplifies all that is great about the purer form of college football that is played at the military academies. The Midshipmen always look undersized and overmatched when they face a major college program, but that's because the Naval Academy is one of the few Division I institutions that still has its helmet on straight when it comes to intercollegiate athletics.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 10, 2003
GOLDEN BEACH - A 43-year-old man died and his friend was seriously injured last night after their personal watercraft collided in the Patuxent River near their homes in this St. Mary's County community, Maryland Natural Resources Police reported. The collision in 3- to 3 1/2 -foot-deep water off Indian Creek occurred about 8:30 p.m. no more than 150 yards offshore, said Heather Lynch, a police spokeswoman. Pronounced dead in an ambulance on the way to St. Mary's Hospital in Leonardtown was Robert L. Doel.
SPORTS
June 8, 2003
Doubts about Sosa will never go away I don't always agree with The Sun's Mike Preston, but his column about Sammy Sosa on Thursday ["Sosa uncorks major doubts about career and character"] hit the nail on the head. The question is, how much has Sosa cheated before and how has he cheated in the past? Baseball could answer these questions by suspending Sosa until he takes a steroid test. There's no chance of that happening, so there will always be doubts about Sosa. No matter what he accomplishes, he will always be remembered for his corked bat. John C. Clarke Sr. Bradenton, Fla. Give good guy Sosa benefit of the doubt After reading and hearing all the self-righteously scathing opinions about Sammy Sosa's corked bat and the unbelievably tragic and far-reaching scope of the ramifications that may ensue, I half expected Sosa's mug shot to appear on the cover of Time magazine this week - with a darkened 5 o'clock shadow, of course.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2003
The National Park Service issued its final ruling yesterday, allowing personal watercraft such as Jet Skis in two small areas off Assateague Island - a decision that environmentalists say will likely be challenged in court. The move occurs more than three years after the Park Service banned the motorized craft in national parks, and two years after a closer, site-specific look at the rules was ordered for Assateague and 21 parks and other land preserves. The approval confirms a plan developed two years ago by officials on Assateague that outlawed the fast-moving craft in most of the 22,000 acres of water under Park Service jurisdiction (up to a half-mile offshore)
NEWS
February 8, 2002
The Chesapeake Women's Club will hold its monthly meeting at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday at the Mountain Road library. The guest speaker will be Dr. Edward Bartlinski of the Wellness and Chiropractic Clinic in Glen Burnie. The club, affiliated with the General Federation of Women's Clubs, helps support local educational, community, and civic projects. The club recently entertain patients at the North Arundel Convalescent Center with an afternoon of bingo games, with prizes and refreshments served.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2002
ST. JANE Frances School will hold an open house Sunday to kick off a week of events celebrating Catholic Schools Week. In addition to Sunday's open house for new and returning pupils and their families, scheduled for 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., the Riviera Beach school has scheduled activities to focus attention on aspects of the school family of students, faculty and staff. Ronald Burinsky, school principal, said that the school's mission is to teach students Catholic values of tolerance, patience, understanding and love of God while promoting a strong academic background.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2003
The National Park Service issued its final ruling yesterday, allowing personal watercraft such as Jet Skis in two small areas off Assateague Island - a decision that environmentalists say will likely be challenged in court. The move occurs more than three years after the Park Service banned the motorized craft in national parks, and two years after a closer, site-specific look at the rules was ordered for Assateague and 21 parks and other land preserves. The approval confirms a plan developed two years ago by officials on Assateague that outlawed the fast-moving craft in most of the 22,000 acres of water under Park Service jurisdiction (up to a half-mile offshore)
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
McHENRY - A marina owner wants to launch a bigger, better tour boat, but some neighbors say the vessel should remain dry-docked. A would-be entrepreneur pitches the idea of a floating hot dog stand, and businesses along the shore cry foul. Jet Skis and other personal watercraft? Some love the thrill; others see them as noisy pests that have no place in the tranquil coves of Deep Creek Lake. At this Western Maryland getaway, most folks agree that the spring fishing's been good, and hopes are high for a lucrative summer tourist season.
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