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By Jacqueline Stenson and Jacqueline Stenson,Los Angeles Times | July 12, 2007
Hoping to shape up and willing to shell out big bucks for a personal trainer to crack the whip? Make sure you know what you're paying for. Spending a lot of money on a high-priced trainer doesn't necessarily mean you're getting the most experienced or best-educated person for the job. It may only mean you're getting the one who's bringing the gym the most business or who's got the most buzz, industry experts caution. With the numbers of personal trainers increasing - and claims of celebrity connections proliferating - cutting through that buzz can be difficult.
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BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2009
Salary: $45,000 Age: 55 Years on the job: Two How she got started: : After receiving a degree in addiction counseling, Chaney went to work at Park West Medical Center running a substance abuse program for HIV-positive clients. She later worked in the anti-smoking campaign for the Black Mental Health Alliance in partnership with the Baltimore City Health Department. She also taught in a nutrition program for addicts at the Baltimore City Detention Center. While working as a nutrition consultant with a personal trainer, she received a certificate in personal training and went on to take a part-time job at the Red Brook Health and Wellness Center.
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NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | August 3, 2003
Personal trainers used to be something only elite exercisers could afford, costing anywhere from $35 to $150 an hour. These days, however, personal trainers are affordable -- and available -- to anyone with a pair of sneakers and an Internet connection. Over the past five years, hundreds of fitness Web sites offering customized training programs have sprouted up on the Internet with names like Wellcoach, Efitness, Ediet, MyFitnessExpert and Bfitanywhere. The American Council on Exercise estimates that hundreds of thousands of Americans are working out with virtual trainers.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2008
Salary: $12 (fitness specialist) and $35 an hour (personal trainer) Age: 27 Years on the job: One How he got started: As a youth football player, Salla was always interested in physical fitness and later got into bodybuilding. He graduated from Towson University with a degree in exercise science, then went to work at a few temporary and part-time jobs before joining the Maryland Athletic Club or MAC. Salla is certified through the American Council on Exercise as a personal trainer. Typical day: Salla began at the MAC as a fitness specialist and still works this job about 15 hours a week, making about $12 an hour.
NEWS
By Vikki Valentine and Vikki Valentine,Special to the Sun | March 26, 2000
Tom O'Brien's call to battle came atop a Colorado mountain on a family vacation. "We had gone skiing in December, and I found myself terribly out of breath," says the 38-year-old physician at Sinai Hospital's neonatal intensive care unit. "I think it was a combination of the altitude and having to carry mine and my family's equipment back and forth to the slopes." But after skiing a week and "eating relatively healthy," he says, "I felt like I was moving in the right direction. And when I got back, I wanted to continue that."
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | March 8, 1994
This is what Norma Pera isn't: wealthy, pampered or famous.what's this 41-year-old married public school teacher doing with her own personal trainer?"I never in a million years thought I would be using a personal trainer," says Ms. Pera, a dance instructor at Baltimore's School for the Arts.Oprah, Arnold and others of their star-studded ilk aren't the only ones employing a personal trainer nowadays. Look around. Your next-door neighbor, your son's fourth-grade teacher or your clothing sales clerk may be booking time with fitness instructors, a growing area of expertise among fitness workers.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett | March 8, 1994
So you want to work out with a personal trainer? Here are a few general guidelines to get you started:* Personal trainers are not required to be certified. However, various fitness associations and organizations offer a certification program, which means trainers are tested for their knowledge. Two of the most prominent national organizations are the American Council on Exercise and the American College of Sports Medicine.* Know your trainer's background. Some have college degrees in exercise or fitness disciplines.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Special to the Sun | October 17, 1999
This time, you're really going to get in shape.You want to improve your tennis game, lose those post-pregnancy pounds, develop a healthy lifestyle after a heart attack, control your diabetes, or have the body shape you dimly remember from an earlier decade.Whatever the reason, you're serious -- even if you don't know how to go about it. The idea of dragging out the dust-covered exercise bike from the far corners of the basement just doesn't appeal to you.That's where a personal trainer comes in, or as they often prefer to be called, a fitness consultant.
SPORTS
February 19, 2004
When that slugger clears the wall with a majestic home run or when that bruising defensive end plows into the quarterback, the fan jumps to his feet, high-fives a buddy or lets loose a whoop. Here's what the typical fan doesn't do: worry that the athlete involved had taken steroids. Moralists can wail that our sports are being ruined by steroids and other performance-enhancing substances, but they need to get off their high horses and just sit down in front of the wide-screen television.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 2004
Push the kids away from the video games, mom and dad. It's your turn now. And don't worry. Playing the latest crop of videos won't make you go soft around the middle - they could make you leaner and stronger. Thanks to software developers who have crafted slick, new animated video exercise programs for adults as well as youthful gamers, the living room is more than ever a great place to work out. Unlike traditional VCR and DVD workouts, which feature humans, these new videos offer virtual personal trainers, dance instructors and even meditation, all personalized and easy to use. The video workouts can be popped into Microsoft's XBox, Sony's PlayStation and, in many cases, a personal computer.
NEWS
October 31, 2007
New grocery store is opening Friday A Trader Joe's market will open Friday morning at the new Gateway Overlook shopping center in Columbia. Billed as a "unique, neighborhood grocery store with foods and beverages from the exotic to the basic," the store plans to hold a ceremonial lei-cutting at 8:30 a.m. It will be open to shoppers at 9 a.m. The 11,100-square-foot store is at 6610 Marie Curie Drive, off Route 175. Operating hours will be 9 a.m. to...
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Sun | October 25, 2007
Lexi Wolfe swings her arms behind her, bends her legs, then leaps smoothly to the top of a square platform. She teeters a little as she lands, so she tries again. Again. And again. Nearby, under the watchful eyes of a fitness trainer at Velocity Sports Performance in Baltimore, three other kids are practicing the same moves. Swing arms. Bend legs. Some landings are more graceful than others: These are not Olympic athletes, after all. These are children ages 8 to 10. Exercise for kids used to seem simple, didn't it?
FEATURES
By Jacqueline Stenson and Jacqueline Stenson,Los Angeles Times | July 12, 2007
Hoping to shape up and willing to shell out big bucks for a personal trainer to crack the whip? Make sure you know what you're paying for. Spending a lot of money on a high-priced trainer doesn't necessarily mean you're getting the most experienced or best-educated person for the job. It may only mean you're getting the one who's bringing the gym the most business or who's got the most buzz, industry experts caution. With the numbers of personal trainers increasing - and claims of celebrity connections proliferating - cutting through that buzz can be difficult.
BUSINESS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
This week, joggers across the country can begin tracking the pace and distance of their runs through a chip in their sneakers that talks to their iPods - the latest high-tech gizmo to help Americans get and stay in shape. Glenn Baker is already a believer in melding fitness and technology. He used a diet and exercise program on his Treo smart phone to shed 13 pounds for his brother's wedding. And triathlete Phil Leigh follows a workout regime he receives daily from his coach via the Internet.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 25, 2005
On a recent Friday night, the women start arriving. There's J.J., Miss Butler, Jamaican Rum and others. Samora Morris, 30, a well-built competitive runner, has given the women nicknames. And he's ready to start shouting and moving. But this isn't some swinging singles scene. It's the Merritt Athletic Club near Woodlawn, and the women are dressed in their favorite sweats, T-shirts and sneakers. For nearly two years, this small group has met with Morris, a certified personal trainer, to blow off steam by jump-starting heart rates, pumping iron and stretching their weekly tensions away.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 2004
Push the kids away from the video games, mom and dad. It's your turn now. And don't worry. Playing the latest crop of videos won't make you go soft around the middle - they could make you leaner and stronger. Thanks to software developers who have crafted slick, new animated video exercise programs for adults as well as youthful gamers, the living room is more than ever a great place to work out. Unlike traditional VCR and DVD workouts, which feature humans, these new videos offer virtual personal trainers, dance instructors and even meditation, all personalized and easy to use. The video workouts can be popped into Microsoft's XBox, Sony's PlayStation and, in many cases, a personal computer.
NEWS
October 31, 2007
New grocery store is opening Friday A Trader Joe's market will open Friday morning at the new Gateway Overlook shopping center in Columbia. Billed as a "unique, neighborhood grocery store with foods and beverages from the exotic to the basic," the store plans to hold a ceremonial lei-cutting at 8:30 a.m. It will be open to shoppers at 9 a.m. The 11,100-square-foot store is at 6610 Marie Curie Drive, off Route 175. Operating hours will be 9 a.m. to...
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
It's one of those late winter days when the world is an endless shade of gray and story ideas are harder to come by than a tobacco lobbyist with a conscience.I'm in the newsroom, not in a swell mood as it is, when the guy at the next desk says: "You should hire a personal trainer."Well. What do you say to something like that? Sure, I've put on a few pounds -- who hasn't? But to practically call someone a fat tub of goo to his face . . ."No," the guy says, "you hire this personal trainer to work out with you, see?
NEWS
By Gailor Large and By Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | August 29, 2004
I want to hire a personal trainer, but I'm not sure I can afford to. Is there any way to get one at a discount? What do they usually charge per hour? You don't have to be in the top tax bracket to hire a personal trainer these days. Visit any gym and you'll find trainers working with clients ranging from students to businessmen. While you ordinarily can expect to pay roughly $50 per session, there are a few things you can do to defray the cost of a trainer. First, ask around to see if you can find a part-time trainer -- they are sometimes willing to negotiate lower fees.
SPORTS
February 19, 2004
When that slugger clears the wall with a majestic home run or when that bruising defensive end plows into the quarterback, the fan jumps to his feet, high-fives a buddy or lets loose a whoop. Here's what the typical fan doesn't do: worry that the athlete involved had taken steroids. Moralists can wail that our sports are being ruined by steroids and other performance-enhancing substances, but they need to get off their high horses and just sit down in front of the wide-screen television.
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