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By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 29, 1994
Q: I would love to buy my mother an outfit, but don't know what to get. I've been told that the answer is to find a personal shopper. If so, how do I go about it?A: Susan Olden, who heads the Saks Fifth Avenue personal shopping service, says you have the right idea. She adds that most major department stores have a personal shopping service, so find out what stores and designers our mother prefers."Contact the stores and set up an appointment for your mother. A good personal shopper will discuss her lifestyle and individual needs before she begins finding the right outfit for her," Ms. Olden says.
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BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA | June 26, 2005
Fashion trends are as fleeting as the seasons they complement; so is the money we throw down to keep pace. Take jeans, for example: Designer pairs cost up to $250. While your backside may be stunning, that kind of shopping can wreak havoc on a bank account. Admittedly, after college you need to build a wardrobe for work. And occasionally falling victim to fashion is almost inevitable - I've certainly brandished my credit card more than once for clothes now buried in the closet. So stylists and personal shoppers offer these pointers for maximizing your look without blowing your budget.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,STAFF WRITER | January 14, 1993
Rose Jones is a friend to the full-figured woman.As a personal shopper who wears a size 14, she helps give customers style and self-esteem."The size 14 is like an outcast. But these women are just as beautiful as the smaller-sized woman. I show them that," says Ms. Jones, 51, the assistant manager of August Max Woman in the Gallery at Harborplace.In the five years that she's worked there, she's cultivated some distinguished clients, including doctors, ministers and TV personalities.Shopping, though, has never been a problem for this pro."
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1996
Attorney Debbie Peyton calls from her car phone on the way in from Annapolis. She'll be about 15 minutes late. That's fine with personal shopper Mary Ellen Theresa Stout Feeley, known to all as "Mets." She continues her flight through the Towson Nordstrom, yanking possible holiday party clothes off the racks for Peyton.Her Ferragamo pumps click-clicking on the floor, Mets zooms from petites to formal wear, searching for silky, satiny, slinky sheaths, gowns and palazzo pants, looks consistent with the profile she has compiled of Peyton.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | December 19, 1993
When the going gets tough the tough go shopping -- or they ask Joyce Baker to do it for them.Ms. Baker, a Pikesville resident, daily combs the racks and shelves of Owings Mills mall's 150 outlets -- from three huge department stores to the everything's-a-buck shop -- to fulfill and anticipate her customers' desires.When a woman who works at a Columbia retirement center couldn't break away to Christmas shop for out-of-town relatives, she faxed a list of 18 names and a budget on a Monday."I put it all together so when she came in on Saturday everything was packed and shipped in an hour and a half," Ms. Baker said.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1996
Attorney Debbie Peyton calls from her car phone on the way in from Annapolis. She'll be about 15 minutes late. That's fine with personal shopper Mary Ellen Theresa Stout Feeley, known to all as "Mets." She continues her flight through the Towson Nordstrom, yanking possible holiday party clothes off the racks for Peyton.Her Ferragamo pumps click-clicking on the floor, Mets zooms from petites to formal wear, searching for silky, satiny, slinky sheaths, gowns and palazzo pants, looks consistent with the profile she has compiled of Peyton.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | June 16, 1994
The rejection letters being sent out by Gail Katz Brady, the talent coordinator for Q2, cheerfully declared, "We've interviewed and tested nearly 400 people over a relatively short period of time and had a great time in the process."Q2 is the QVC Network's new shopping channel, aimed at customers who still sniff at QVC. It will begin broadcasting a full weekend schedule in September.Many of those people are now fashion or beauty editors, or free-lance stylists or writers, and at least 28 of them have taken classes from Dorothy Sarnoff, the chairwoman of Speech Dynamics, on how to sell, sell, sell.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA | June 26, 2005
Fashion trends are as fleeting as the seasons they complement; so is the money we throw down to keep pace. Take jeans, for example: Designer pairs cost up to $250. While your backside may be stunning, that kind of shopping can wreak havoc on a bank account. Admittedly, after college you need to build a wardrobe for work. And occasionally falling victim to fashion is almost inevitable - I've certainly brandished my credit card more than once for clothes now buried in the closet. So stylists and personal shoppers offer these pointers for maximizing your look without blowing your budget.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
Nordstrom Inc., which built its reputation on how it interacts with customers face to face, is gearing up for a not-too-distant future in which its salespeople will interact with shoppers through two-way television screens.The Seattle-based department store chain told shareholders at its annual meeting yesterday that it would launch a series of direct marketing efforts over the next several years, including a full-scale catalog operation and possible participation in televised shopping programs.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | November 24, 1994
Around Owings Mills mall, Joyce Baker is often known by another name: pin lady.That's because she's frequently seen --ing in and out of stores wearing three at once.Ms. Baker, who has shopped for hundreds of people since becoming the manager of customer service and personal shopping at the mall three years ago, believes that accessories are the key to updating a wardrobe.Her fondness for pins has raised eyebrows among some shoppers. But she's learned to let an odd comment or glance pass her by."
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | November 24, 1994
Around Owings Mills mall, Joyce Baker is often known by another name: pin lady.That's because she's frequently seen --ing in and out of stores wearing three at once.Ms. Baker, who has shopped for hundreds of people since becoming the manager of customer service and personal shopping at the mall three years ago, believes that accessories are the key to updating a wardrobe.Her fondness for pins has raised eyebrows among some shoppers. But she's learned to let an odd comment or glance pass her by."
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 29, 1994
Q: I would love to buy my mother an outfit, but don't know what to get. I've been told that the answer is to find a personal shopper. If so, how do I go about it?A: Susan Olden, who heads the Saks Fifth Avenue personal shopping service, says you have the right idea. She adds that most major department stores have a personal shopping service, so find out what stores and designers our mother prefers."Contact the stores and set up an appointment for your mother. A good personal shopper will discuss her lifestyle and individual needs before she begins finding the right outfit for her," Ms. Olden says.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | June 16, 1994
The rejection letters being sent out by Gail Katz Brady, the talent coordinator for Q2, cheerfully declared, "We've interviewed and tested nearly 400 people over a relatively short period of time and had a great time in the process."Q2 is the QVC Network's new shopping channel, aimed at customers who still sniff at QVC. It will begin broadcasting a full weekend schedule in September.Many of those people are now fashion or beauty editors, or free-lance stylists or writers, and at least 28 of them have taken classes from Dorothy Sarnoff, the chairwoman of Speech Dynamics, on how to sell, sell, sell.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | December 19, 1993
When the going gets tough the tough go shopping -- or they ask Joyce Baker to do it for them.Ms. Baker, a Pikesville resident, daily combs the racks and shelves of Owings Mills mall's 150 outlets -- from three huge department stores to the everything's-a-buck shop -- to fulfill and anticipate her customers' desires.When a woman who works at a Columbia retirement center couldn't break away to Christmas shop for out-of-town relatives, she faxed a list of 18 names and a budget on a Monday."I put it all together so when she came in on Saturday everything was packed and shipped in an hour and a half," Ms. Baker said.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
Nordstrom Inc., which built its reputation on how it interacts with customers face to face, is gearing up for a not-too-distant future in which its salespeople will interact with shoppers through two-way television screens.The Seattle-based department store chain told shareholders at its annual meeting yesterday that it would launch a series of direct marketing efforts over the next several years, including a full-scale catalog operation and possible participation in televised shopping programs.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,STAFF WRITER | January 14, 1993
Rose Jones is a friend to the full-figured woman.As a personal shopper who wears a size 14, she helps give customers style and self-esteem."The size 14 is like an outcast. But these women are just as beautiful as the smaller-sized woman. I show them that," says Ms. Jones, 51, the assistant manager of August Max Woman in the Gallery at Harborplace.In the five years that she's worked there, she's cultivated some distinguished clients, including doctors, ministers and TV personalities.Shopping, though, has never been a problem for this pro."
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | December 3, 1992
I need to say this fairly fast because I'm due at my Holiday Shopping Empowerment Group in about a half-hour.Today's topic is: "Healing the Wounds of the Inner Shopper." Our counselor, Bobbi, says the talk will help us understand the roots of our aversion to holiday gift shopping.We're also going to go over the diaries she asked us to keep during the three days after Thanksgiving, which, as everyone knows, is the Mount Everest of holiday shopping.Our assignment was to go out and buy one gift.
NEWS
By [LIZ ATWOOD] | February 10, 2008
HANDBAGS AND THE CITY 5614 Newbury St., Mount Washington / / Hours: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday / / 410-601-0096; handbagsandthecity.com ........................ GEORGE SAKELLARIS SPENT 18 years working for Washington-area department stores and another few years as a personal shopper. But if you ask his opinion, it isn't the clothes that make the man (or woman), it's the accessories. "I've always loved accessories. That's the most exciting part of any wardrobe," he said.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | December 3, 1992
I need to say this fairly fast because I'm due at my Holiday Shopping Empowerment Group in about a half-hour.Today's topic is: "Healing the Wounds of the Inner Shopper." Our counselor, Bobbi, says the talk will help us understand the roots of our aversion to holiday gift shopping.We're also going to go over the diaries she asked us to keep during the three days after Thanksgiving, which, as everyone knows, is the Mount Everest of holiday shopping.Our assignment was to go out and buy one gift.
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