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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | October 2, 2009
Washington is proposing rules, restrictions and the creation of an entire federal agency to stop dumb consumers from repeating the mortgage disaster or something just as bad. Maryland has another idea. Make dumb consumers smart. Don't let kids out of school without a basic understanding of interest rates, bank fees and scams that will persist no matter how baby-proof Congress tries to make the system. State officials are about to reveal proposals for personal-finance instruction that could be in the classroom by next fall.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 1, 2013
For someone in their 20s, retirement is something their parents are talking about. It is almost impossible for them to imagine their own lives 50 years out. Telling kids to save for that day - when student loans and car payments and fixed expenses are eating up their paychecks - does seem laughable. When she talks to young people about planning for retirement, Gail MarksJarvis , who writes about personal finance for the Chicago Tribune, likes to use the $20 lesson. "If you ask them if they can save $20 a week, they say, sure.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
About a dozen years ago, the Internet bubble had burst and many workers were forced to postpone retirement because their 401(k)s were wiped out by the bear market. Today, we're living through the aftermath of another bubble collapse and workers again are wondering when, or even if, they'll be able to retire. In the time between these two devastating events, I like to think that workers have become more informed and engaged in finances. When this column launched 13 years ago, many people didn't know about credit scores and that a lender judged whether they could borrow money and at what interest rate based on that number.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
As a senior financial planner with Baltimore money manager T. Rowe Price, Stuart Ritter spends much of his time on the job - and off - educating people about personal finance. April is Financial Literacy Month, and as many surveys show - including one by Price - we have a long way to go before we're a money-savvy nation. That means Ritter has his work cut out for him. Ritter took some time to answer questions about personal finance as it relates to parents and their children.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1991
The Sun begins today a weekly package of stories and features on personal finance. The features include:* Jane Bryant Quinn's syndicated column.* A column on mutual-fund investing written for The Sun by Werner Renberg, an expert on mutual funds and the author of two books on the subject.* Tables of interest rates being offered on deposit accounts by area banks and savings and loans (a similar table on mortgage rates appears in the Sunday Real Estate section) and a table of loan and deposit rates from area credit unions.
NEWS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
Move over, Suze Orman. Watch your back, Jim Cramer. There's a new personal finance guru in the bookstores. After tackling other vital topics, including marriage, guys, bad songs and exploding urinals, humorist Dave Barry has turned his talents to personal finance. Dave Barry's Money Secrets is full of tips and observations from how to argue with your spouse about money and the financial advantages of early death in retirement planning to Donald Trump's hair. Here's one Barry tip: You won't have to bother saving for college if your child's grades are poor enough so he or she can only get into a bad, low-cost college.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz and Humberto Cruz,Tribune Media Services | January 14, 2007
In half the time it takes Jack Bauer to save the world (the indefatigable federal agent from the 24 television series does it in 24 hours), I was saved from losing sight of what personal finance is all about. My rescuer: Rachael, a young hotel waitress who approached the table where my wife, Georgina, and I were having breakfast and asked whether we needed anything else. The following, taking me from disenchantment to rediscovery, takes place between 8 p.m. and 8 a.m. during a recent hotel stay to attend a conference on personal finance: 8 p.m.: I register and pick up the conference program, an inch-thick packet filled with glowing speaker biographies and copies of elaborate, graphics-filled presentations they would make over the next two days.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA and CAROLYN BIGDA,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | September 2, 2007
You can take a course in calculus, Greek literature or mechanical engineering in college. But if you want to learn about budgeting and retirement planning, many schools have nothing to offer. That was the case at the Johns Hopkins University until last spring. Based on the experience of young alumni working on Wall Street, the school has begun to provide an accredited class in personal finance. "A lot of them were telling us they would have benefited from learning how to make personal financial decisions," said John C. Wierman, a professor and director of the university's Center for Leadership Education, which oversees the W. P. Carey Program in Entrepreneurship and Management.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 6, 1999
The Sun will sponsor a conference on personal finance Saturday at the Baltimore Convention Center.Tammany Buckwalter, events coordinator, said the daylong conference will feature leading authorities on personal finance and money management.Among them are Don Phillips, chief executive officer of Morningstar Inc., publisher of mutual funds ratings and other financial information; Tom Gardner, one of the creators of the online financial service the Motley Fool; Jean Sherman Chatzky, editor at large of Money magazine and a contributor to NBC's "Today Show"; and Kenneth S. Apfel, Social Security commissioner.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | March 15, 2009
It's often said that talking about money is the last taboo. But our cash coyness appears to be disappearing along with the growth of personal finance Web logs, where writers share their money mistakes and take us on their journey toward financial enlightenment. Bargaineering.com, getrichslowly.org and thesimpledollar.com are listed among the top 10 personal-finance blogs based on traffic. The three sites are so successful that their founders were able to leave their 9-to-5 jobs a year ago for full-time blogging.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
Long study has persuaded me that there are only four personal-finance columns in newspapering, which rotate week to week every month:   1. Saving for your children's college education No way you can ever save enougn. You're screwed.    2. Saving for your retirement It's already too late to catch up. You're screwed.   3. Investing in stocks Too risky. You're screwed.    4. Investing in bonds Too little return. You're screwed.   
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
About a dozen years ago, the Internet bubble had burst and many workers were forced to postpone retirement because their 401(k)s were wiped out by the bear market. Today, we're living through the aftermath of another bubble collapse and workers again are wondering when, or even if, they'll be able to retire. In the time between these two devastating events, I like to think that workers have become more informed and engaged in finances. When this column launched 13 years ago, many people didn't know about credit scores and that a lender judged whether they could borrow money and at what interest rate based on that number.
NEWS
July 18, 2012
Mitt Romney, release those tax returns. In crisis management, most experienced campaign consultants will tell you, the best thing to do when the proverbial manure hits the rotating blades, is to come clean: Tell the public everything you know, sit down with reporters until they run out of questions, and put all details out on the table in some exhaustive way. Whether it's the Tylenol tampering incidents or Bill Clinton's Gennifer Flowers scandal,...
BUSINESS
December 31, 2011
With 2011 winding down, there's still time for some smart moves to keep your finances in order. Here are some tips that will help you in 2011 and next year: Make charitable donations. Make a donation today by credit card and you'll get the deduction on your 2011 tax return, but won't have to pay the bill until 2012. Clean out closets. Donate gently used clothes and goods for a tax deduction. Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake is taking donations today from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Contribute to college savings plan.
BUSINESS
Liz F. Kay | September 21, 2011
We've mentioned eXtension.org as a Consumer Website of the Week before. The site offers online access to courses, workshops and training offered by land grant institutions across the country. If you're curious about becoming a wine grape grower or just needing more blueberry recipes , this site is for you. There's also a lot of personal finance information as well as tips and calculators for businesses, youth and more. But eXtension.org now has even more features.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | February 20, 2011
It's a shame the Louisiana legislature passed, and Gov. Bobby Jindal signed, the 2008 Louisiana Science Education Act. Not only does the act make it more likely that Louisiana teachers will suggest that evolution and global warming are fake. A side effect of such bills is to set Maryland school officials dead against the idea of mandating a high-school course in personal finance. The General Assembly is considering making personal finance a requirement for graduation. Two years after incompetent consumers teamed up with predatory bankers to cause the worst economic slump in 80 years, this is a great idea.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2003
Too many Maryland residents know next to nothing about personal finance, and they're passing that dangerous defect along to their children, business and education leaders say. To help solve that problem, they are proposing that students be required to pass a personal finance course to graduate from high school. Only Baltimore County has such a requirement, but if the organizers of the financial literacy effort have their way, districts across the state would begin requiring personal finance courses.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2000
Today, personal finance writer Eileen Ambrose profiles Mark Marianelli, a young man who has a firm grip on his financial life. For more personal finance coverage, see today's special Dollars & Sense section on Your Financial Lifeline, with a focus on planning for the different stages of life. The regular Dollars & Sense pages will return to the Business section next Sunday.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose Personal finance | April 11, 2010
U sually, if you haven't filed your federal tax return by this time, you're either a procrastinator or avoiding paying Uncle Sam the money you owe. But this season, more filers than usual are dragging their feet. The number of returns submitted by late March was down by more than 2 million compared with a year earlier, according to the latest IRS figures. "It has to be tied to the economy," says Bob Meighan, vice president at TurboTax, maker of the popular tax preparation software.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose Personal finance | April 6, 2010
M aybe you meant to save for retirement after repaying your student loans. Then you had children, a mortgage and college tuition for your kids. Now, you're in your mid-50s without a penny for retirement. Is it too late to build a nest egg? Not only isn't it too late, but a serious saver could accumulate well over $400,000 in a decade, according to calculations by Baltimore's T. Rowe Price Associates. "Don't give up hope," says Christine Fahlund, Price's senior financial planner.
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