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By Barbara Richardson and Barbara Richardson,Evening Sun Staff | January 7, 1991
Oletha Minto, a freshman at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, was able to use her own computer to complete assignments during her first semester."
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By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | June 6, 2014
A former long-term substitute at an Ellicott City middle school already facing child porn and sex abuse charges was indicted on an additional 50 counts of child pornography by a Howard County grand jury this week.  Jeremy Sykes, 43, of Hesperus Drive in Columbia, was indicted on the additional 50 counts on June 3. The additional charges were filed by police in May after investigators said they discovered 50 images of child pornography on Sykes'...
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BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | December 10, 1990
After 10 years of marketing to big business, government agencies and schools, the personal computer industry now is taking what analysts call the "low road" by trying to sell to small companies and individuals.The industry is betting that this strategy, along with retaining existing clients, will help it through the difficult economic times that may lie ahead.Computer prices have been cut, software packages simplified, and distribution channels are changing. Personal computers now are being sold in discount electronics stores along side toasters and radios.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie and Sara Toth llavoie@tribune.com stoth@tribune.com | January 10, 2014
A Columbia man and long-term substitute teacher at an Ellicott City middle school was charged Thursday night with possession of child pornography, Howard County police said Friday. Jeremy Sykes, 43, of Hesperus Drive in Columbia, was charged after police traced child pornography to his personal computer at his home and a second computer belonging to the Howard County Public School System, police said. Police said there is no indication the images were of students at Folly Quarter Middle School, where Sykes has been teaching since October 2013.
BUSINESS
By Jonathan Yenkin and Jonathan Yenkin,AP Business Writer | May 13, 1991
BOSTON -- Digital Equipment Corp., left behind in the personal computer boom, is trying to do some catching up.This week Digital plans to unveil a new line of personal computers under an alliance with Intel Corp.And while analysts don't expect Digital to quickly become a dominant player in the personal computer market, they say the strategy will help the company build on its success designing networks for the small desktop machines."Digital is no longer off the radar scope," said Terry Shannon, an analyst with International Data Corp.
BUSINESS
By Ron Wolf and Ron Wolf,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 12, 1991
Robert Noyce, the co-inventor of the semiconductor chip, was boasting to an electronics industry conference 20 years ago of the day when a room-sized $5 million mainframe computer might be squeezed onto a single sliver of silicon, perhaps the size of a dime.A questioner who couldn't accept Mr. Noyce's stunning prophecy asked how he would feel if he accidentally dropped his tiny computer and lost it through a crack in the floor.Mr. Noyce replied that he wouldn't care because it would cost only $1 or so.The electronics industry still has not been able to produce the disposable $1 computer envisioned by Mr. Noyce.
BUSINESS
By Marianne Taylor and Marianne Taylor,Chicago Tribune | July 29, 1991
Chicago - The same forces that created the nation's Wal-Marts, K marts and discount drug emporiums are at work in the computer industry, spawning a new breed of warehouse-size forums for the sale of personal computers.So far, only a handful of such outlets exist nationwide. But for the once-elite personal computer market, mass merchandising appears to be the password for the 1990s.For instance, Tandy Corp. recently announced plans to phase out 200 of its Radio Shack Computer Center stores in favor of six larger Computer City Supercenters this year.
BUSINESS
By Lawrence Edelman and Lawrence Edelman,Boston Globe | May 27, 1991
The sexy personal computer industry is looking a lot less glamorous after a week in which some of the biggest names in the business took a trouncing.Consider: Loss-plagued Businessland Inc., once the largest franchiser of PC retail stores, said it may have to file for bankruptcy protection.Compaq Computer Corp.'s stock, for years a Wall Street favorite, plunged 27 percent after it warned that second-quarter earnings may be 80 percent below last year's level.Apple Computer Inc. was reported to be considering layoffs of up to 2,000 employees, or 12.8 percent of its work force, as part of a cost-cutting plan to offset falling profits.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | July 8, 1991
The Intel Corp., confirming what some of its customers have already announced, last week formally introduced a 50-megahertz version of the i486 DX microprocessor.The new chip becomes the fastest and most powerful microprocessor available for personal computers, and it moves us one step closer to the day when the average PC user will have access to the computing power of a mainframe computer.Of course, not everyone needs a mainframe on a chip, especially since computers built around it are expected to cost $10,000 or more when they become widely available later this year.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 8, 1991
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Back in the mid-1970s, there was only one way to get a personal computer: You had to build it yourself.Since then, personal computers have become ubiquitous, and hundreds of models are sold by everybody from mom-and-pop garage operations to warehouse "superstores."But for those who long for the days of the Altair computer kit, there's no reason to despair. You can still build a machine, one that's as good as any clone on the market, for about the same price.It's not as difficult as it might seem.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Baltimore County authorities say they found Social Security numbers and other personal information from more than 12,000 current and former county workers on the computer of a man who used to work for a county information-technology contractor. The man is in custody in another state and is to be extradited to Maryland to face charges in an unrelated identity-theft case. Police say the hard drive on a personal computer seized by authorities contains information that includes county employees' home addresses, salaries, leave balances and county identification numbers.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Army investigators found nearly half a million field reports from Iraq and Afghanistan on a computer memory card among the belongings of Pfc. Bradley Manning, with a note suggesting that an unnamed recipient "sit on this information" while deciding how best to distribute it, according to testimony Monday. The note called the reports "possibly one of the more significant documents of our time" and said they would remove "the fog of war" and reveal "the true nature of 21st century asymmetric warfare," Army special agent David Shaver told the officer leading a preliminary hearing at Fort Meade.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Quinn and Michelle Quinn,Los Angeles Times | July 26, 2007
SAN FRANCISCO -- All eyes were on the iPhone, but the Mac stole the show. Apple Inc. said yesterday that it sold 270,000 of its new iPhone devices during the two days they were on sale last quarter, roughly meeting analysts' expectations. But the company's oldest product - the personal computer - delivered surprising growth. Consumers snapped up a record 1.76 million Macintosh computers during Apple's fiscal third quarter, up 33 percent from a year ago. That outpaced the overall PC industry, which shipped 12 percent more computers last quarter.
NEWS
July 15, 2007
Johnson re-elected school board head The Anne Arundel County Board of Education elected Tricia Johnson last week to a second stint as president, thwarting former Vice President Eugene Peterson's ambition to ascend to the post. Peterson, who has emerged as a controversial figure for frank comments about racial inequity in schools, accused his colleagues of resting on "predictable stereotypes" and overlooking him for being "too pushy, too upfront, and [lacking] a diplomatic approach." Though he had objections to "the orchestrated effort to not make me president," Peterson seconded Johnson's selection and nominated Enrique M. Melendez for vice president.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | June 14, 2007
Editor's note: After a 40-year career at the Chicago Tribune, the last 14 years of which he spent demystifying and untangling the complexities of the computer age for readers, Jim Coates is retiring. Well, boys and girls, it's time for the old guy with the white beard to log off. Ah, war stories. I've got thousands of them, but relax. For that kind of stuff, you can wait for my autobiography - the working title is Famous People Who Have Known Me. But let me just tell you about the most prescient piece I ever wrote.
NEWS
By Dusty Horwitt | April 22, 2007
As we mark Earth Day today amid growing concern over global warming, one seeming bright spot is the promise of computers and the Internet to deliver a cleaner economy based on information rather than raw materials. That was the gist of a 2004 article in the journal Environmental Science and Technology in which University of California, Berkeley, researchers Michael W. Toffel and Arpad Horvath analyzed paper and Internet delivery of The New York Times to readers in Berkeley. The pair found that the environmental case for Internet news was a slam dunk, confirming what was apparently obvious.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 22, 1995
LAS VEGAS -- Those searching for insights into what will be driving the post-Cold War economy may have gotten an important, if unexpected, clue last week: Alliance Gaming Corp. announced that it was acquiring Bally Gaming International Inc. for $215 million.Some might regard the combination of two Las Vegas companies that essentially manufacture souped-up slot machines as something less than an economic milestone.But Craig I. Fields, a man who knows a few things about the Cold War, thinks otherwise.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
A former Anne Arundel County physical education teacher pleaded guilty Monday to child pornography charges but will not serve any jail time. Gregory Christy, 39, who most recently taught at Rippling Woods Elementary School in Glen Burnie, pleaded guilty to two counts of possessing child pornography. Under the plea agreement, he must forfeit his teaching license and register as a sex offender for 15 years. Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Paul A. Hackner also placed Christy on five years' probation and suspended an 18-month jail sentence.
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