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BUSINESS
April 22, 1992
A small California company got a shot in the arm last week when American Personal Communications, a Baltimore-based cellular company, publicly endorsed its digital technology for use with personal communication networks.Personal communication networks (PCNs) represent the next generation of wireless communication. They are indoor cellular systems that allow customers to make calls from virtually anywhere.American Personal Communications, which developed the nation's first cellular system in the early 1980s, is testing PCNs.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2001
High-tech communications might seem ubiquitous, but for people who want to testify at local government public hearings in the Baltimore metropolitan area, not much has changed in recent decades. Although e-mailed testimony is becoming more common, residents who want their say in person show up, sign their names to a paper list and then wait, sometimes for hours. "It's always come down to the easiest, fastest, fairest method - first come, first served," said Thomas J. Peddicord Jr., Baltimore County Council secretary.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | January 10, 1995
The Washington Post Co. bailed out of its investment in a new generation of wireless telephone services yesterday as it announced the sale of almost all of its stake in Bethesda-based American Personal Communications.The Washington-based newspaper company sold all but 1.5 percent of its 70 percent stake in American Personal Communications to APC Inc., its partner in the venture, and a joint venture of Sprint Corp. and three of the nation's leading cable companies.APC Inc., controlled by the Schelle family of Brooklandville, will own 49.5 percent of American Personal Communications, which has been awarded one of the two licenses for "personal communications services" (PCS)
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
The controversy over cellular phone towers -- pitting suburban residents against communications companies -- has crept into Harford County, with three cellular poles planned near Bel Air.American Personal Communications -- a Sprint Spectrum affiliate -- plans two of the poles, and AT&T Wireless Services wants to put up another one.But at meeting yesterday of the Harford County Development Advisory Committee, which reviews site plans for county zoning officials,...
BUSINESS
November 18, 1995
Sprint Spectrum, the digital wireless phone service that made its debut in the Baltimore-Washington area Wednesday, apparently is on track after a rocky start.American Personal Communications Inc., the Bethesda-based company that operates the network, said yesterday that a glitch in a computer program prevented some early purchasers of its "personal communications services," or PCS, handsets from activating their accounts Wednesday and Thursday.Anne Phillips Schelle, an APC spokeswoman, said the problem was straightened out by yesterday morning.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1997
The local affiliate of Sprint Spectrum said it has reached a deal that will let its customers use their wireless phones outside the Baltimore-Washington area for the first time, but initially only when they travel to the New York area.American Personal Communications of Bethesda, which controls the local Sprint Spectrum affiliate, quickly carved out up to a 30 percent share of the Baltimore-Washington wireless phone market after introducing all-digital personal communications service phones in 1995.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1995
...TC American Personal Communications, a Bethesda-based company that plans to launch a new generation of wireless telephone services later this year, said yesterday that it will locate its main switching hub in Hanover, bringing up to 50 jobs to northern Anne Arundel County.APC, one of three companies the Federal Communications Commission has designated as "pioneers" in personal communications services (PCS) technology, has signed a 10- year lease on a 15,000-square-foot office in the Park Circle industrial park near Dorsey Road and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway.
NEWS
By Edmund L. Andrews and Edmund L. Andrews,New York Times News Service | September 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- America is about to start coming unwired.A decade after cellular telephones first captured the hearts of the hurried and the well-to-do by letting them stay plugged in without being pinned down, the federal government is about to clear the airwaves for an expansion of wireless offerings more sophisticated than anything available today.On Thursday, after four years of work, the Federal Communications Commission will adopt rules that will create three to six new wireless networks in every city and town.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | June 25, 1991
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. asked the Federal Communications Commission yesterday for permission to try out a new technology that could be used to set up a "personal communications network."So far, the FCC has granted about 50 licenses to a variety of companies to trial test PCNs, which are small-scale cellular telephone systems that are designed for use in urban areas. If AT&T's request is granted, it would be the first major long-distance company to enter this market.Unlike regular cellular phones, PCNs are small -- about the size of a cigarette pack -- and relatively inexpensive.
NEWS
By RAY PERSEGHIN | January 10, 1995
Telecommunications is a big business that is getting bigger, and I'm not so sure I like the idea.Big companies are forming partnerships to offer more services and vie for control. Pacific Bell is entering the wireless communications market with a system it calls a Personal Communications Service (PCS). This new system will eventually provide voice, data and video two-way communications. People can be reached anywhere, at any time, with just one number. This lends new meaning to the old phrase, ''We're got your number.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1997
Tessco Technologies Inc. saw its stock take another big hit yesterday after the Sparks-based distributor of wireless phone equipment reported fourth-quarter profits that were, as expected, well below last year's.Tessco said it earned 11 cents a share, or $499,000, before a nonrecurring charge of 4 cents a share. In the same period last year, the company earned 24 cents per share, or $1.1 million.The company said last month that it would earn between 9 cents and 14 cents a share for the quarter that ended March 28, which is also the end of the company's fiscal year.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1997
The local affiliate of Sprint Spectrum said it has reached a deal that will let its customers use their wireless phones outside the Baltimore-Washington area for the first time, but initially only when they travel to the New York area.American Personal Communications of Bethesda, which controls the local Sprint Spectrum affiliate, quickly carved out up to a 30 percent share of the Baltimore-Washington wireless phone market after introducing all-digital personal communications service phones in 1995.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1996
AT&T Corp. unveiled a digitally souped-up cellular phone service serving 70 million people yesterday, setting the stage for a wireless digital system that experts called a landmark in technology's march toward ever-present wireless phones.The Basking Ridge, N.J.-based phone giant said the system will be finished rolling out by the end of 1997, when it will serve areas with a combined population of more than 212 million people.The Baltimore-Washington corridor will be hooked up by mid-1997, company executives said.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1996
American Personal Communications Inc., builder of the nation's first all-digital wireless telephone network, says it has signed up 60,000 subscribers for its Sprint Spectrum service -- almost 10 months ahead of its original projections.The Bethesda-based company's announcement at the Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association convention in Dallas this week was its first release of sales data for the pioneering "personal communications services" network since APC launched the service in the Baltimore-Washington area in November.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser HTC and Michael Dresser HTC,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1996
Tessco Technologies Inc., a Sparks-based provider of equipment for the wireless communications industry, reported yesterday that its third-quarter net earnings jumped 48 percent despite an overall softness in the cellular telephone market.The company said its earnings for the quarter ended Dec. 29 rose to $1.1 million, or 24 cents a share, from $759,000, or 17 cents a share, during last year's third quarter. It reported revenues of $23.8 million, up 20 percent from $19.8 million during the third quarter of 1994, as operating margins increased from 6.1 percent to 7.2 percent.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1995
Sprint Spectrum, the digital wireless phone service that made its debut in the Baltimore-Washington area Wednesday, apparently is on track after a rocky start.American Personal Communications Inc., the Bethesda-based company that operates the network, said yesterday that a glitch in a computer program prevented some early purchasers of its "personal communications services," or PCS, handsets from activating their accounts Wednesday and Thursday.Anne Phillips Schelle, an APC spokeswoman, said the problem was straightened out by yesterday morning.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | February 1, 1995
Maryland's state government, hoping to benefit from the explosive growth of wireless communications, will open up its lands, buildings and other structures to private companies' antennas and towers -- for a price.Dave Humphrey, a spokesman for the state Department of General Services, said yesterday that the state plans to issue a bid request in March inviting cellular telephone companies and similar businesses to make offers for the non-exclusive right to place their facilities for telecommunications services.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1995
Twelve years ago, Baltimore's Wayne N. Schelle helped spark a revolution in communications by starting a pioneering wireless telephone network serving his hometown and Washington.The network, only the second in the country, was called Cellular One. It has since become a nationwide brand.This week Mr. Schelle will be up to his old tricks -- attempting to overthrow an "old" technology in favor of a new one.On Wednesday, his American Personal Communications Inc. will announce the launch of service on the nation's first digital "PCS" network here and in Washington.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1995
AT&T Wireless PCS Inc. emerged as the winner of the Baltimore-Washington license to provide a new generation of cellular telephone services as the Federal Communications Commission yesterday ended the largest auction of airwaves since Marconi invented radio.The AT&T Corp. subsidiary emerged victorious for the single Baltimore-Washington license in the auction with a bid of $211.7 million. The other local license was awarded previously to American Personal Communications of Bethesda for being a pioneer in the development of "personal communications services" (PCS)
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