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Persimmon

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NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 1, 2004
The poor persimmon - so unappreciated, so underrated. "It's a fruit not too many people are comfortable with," says Michel Tersiguel, the chef at Tersiguel's, the French country restaurant in Ellicott City. "You see it on the shelves once a year, you grab it, you try it and you figure once is enough. And that's too bad because there's all sorts of stuff you can do with persimmons when you use your imagination." This late-fall fruit, available at markets into January, generally is associated with baked goods - cookies, bread, pie, cake and especially persimmon pudding.
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman , Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2009
Alice Cottle from Fort Bragg, Calif., was looking for a recipe for persimmon bread. Lorraine Hatter from Tremont, Pa., sent in a recipe she found in September/October issue of Good Old Days magazine for the bread. Persimmons are a fall or winter fruit that are very good eaten raw or cooked to make lovely bread when gently spiced with cinnamon and augmented with raisins and chopped walnuts as in this recipe. This bread is moist and delicious, and keeps well for several days so it makes an ideal gift.
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NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | July 27, 2009
Question: : A while ago, I read about persimmon tea for acid reflux. I have it from time to time, but my husband has it constantly. It is so bad that he wakes up almost every night and throws up! Prilosec, Nexium and a host of other drugs along with extra-strength Gaviscon or Pepcid do nothing. I made the persimmon tea. He drank a shot glass full the first morning and a shot glass after supper. From Day 1, he has slept soundly, and so have I. Nothing he eats now causes him heartburn. The recipe was simple, though we did have trouble finding persimmons at first.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | July 27, 2009
Question: : A while ago, I read about persimmon tea for acid reflux. I have it from time to time, but my husband has it constantly. It is so bad that he wakes up almost every night and throws up! Prilosec, Nexium and a host of other drugs along with extra-strength Gaviscon or Pepcid do nothing. I made the persimmon tea. He drank a shot glass full the first morning and a shot glass after supper. From Day 1, he has slept soundly, and so have I. Nothing he eats now causes him heartburn. The recipe was simple, though we did have trouble finding persimmons at first.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 8, 2000
NEW YORK - The mugwort sounds like a villain from a Harry Potter novel, or the name of some plug-ugly in a bad 1930s prison movie. It's not a pretty plant, nor, by plant standards, is it very nice. To reproduce, it's quite capable of giving less aggressive flora an elbow in the eye and a shove toward extinction. The mugwort's a survivor. The persimmon, on the other hand, is every botanist's dream - a civilized and lovely tree that propagates at a leisurely pace, doesn't push out other species and produces a fine-scented blossom.
FEATURES
October 12, 1997
I recently moved here from Minnesota and noticed some tall trees in Druid Hill Park with deep checkered bark and green fruits. Someone told me they are persimmon trees. When should they be harvested? Can I grow any dwarf varieties in my rowhouse back yard?The American persimmon tree is common to our area. The fruits are highly astringent when green. Upon ripening they turn a dull orange color, soften and become very palatable. They can be eaten fresh, although the seeds are large. To enjoy this harvest you'll need to begin foraging on the ground for the dropped fruits beginning in mid-October.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | July 31, 2008
I was stung on my left leg five times by yellow jackets. I have osteoarthritis in my left knee, and the pain has been gone since I was stung. I'm hoping that it will last! If I had a choice, though, I would definitely pick honeybee stings over yellow jackets, as they're much less painful. You're not the first person to share such a story with us. Years ago, a reader wrote: "While snoozing on the porch, I was stung on the finger by a tiny bee. The result: intense pain and, after that, a great reduction of arthritis in my arm."
BUSINESS
November 28, 1993
OPENING SOONPersimmon Park1. Thomas Builders will open three new townhouse models at Persimmon Park in Owings Mills New Town in mid-December. The houses -- starting at $109,990 -- are the lowest-priced townhouses in New Town, the builder said.The least expensive house is the Maguire, a 1,280-square-foot two-bedroom model that comes with one full and one half bath, a kitchen and breakfast room, gas heat, a utility room with laundry hookups and a living/dining room combination.The two other models are the Clairlee and Nicholas, three-bedroom homes that can be built with two master bedroom suites.
NEWS
By Tom Osborne and Tom Osborne,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2001
It's more than just the swing. It's more than the player, even if the player is Tiger Woods. When Woods tees off Thursday in this year's U.S. Open Championship in Tulsa, Okla., his caddie will hand him a driver, the club in his bag that when used skillfully will send the golf ball farther than any other club Woods carries. That driver will be a lot different from the ones used 50 years ago, when Ben Hogan was golf's top player. When Hogan hit a drive in the 1940s, spectators would marvel at a ball that carried 250 yards.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | November 7, 2008
The village of Oakside is a suburb within a suburb within a suburb - a pinprick of a development lost in the sprawl of Owings Mills, well past the mall and the familiar big-box stores, backed against an environmental preserve that prevents building any farther west. It consists of 149 neatly kept townhouses surrounded by hundreds more that are unique only in the names of their neighborhoods - Persimmon Park, Sherwood Hill, Wainwright. Oakside does not have a crime problem. The treasurer of the community association wants to make that abundantly clear.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2008
Claire Krach of Glen Arm was looking for a recipe for Nancy Reagan's Persimmon Pudding that she said dates to the Reagan White House. Janet Morrissey of Baltimore had the recipe, which was clipped from a newspaper and taped to a recipe card in her mother's recipe box. She says it is a very good dessert that everyone in her family loves. Persimmons are available from October through December. This dense, velvety pudding will make for an elegant and festive finish to any holiday meal. If you are looking for a hard-to-find recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278, or e-mail recipefinder@baltsun.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | November 7, 2008
The village of Oakside is a suburb within a suburb within a suburb - a pinprick of a development lost in the sprawl of Owings Mills, well past the mall and the familiar big-box stores, backed against an environmental preserve that prevents building any farther west. It consists of 149 neatly kept townhouses surrounded by hundreds more that are unique only in the names of their neighborhoods - Persimmon Park, Sherwood Hill, Wainwright. Oakside does not have a crime problem. The treasurer of the community association wants to make that abundantly clear.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | July 31, 2008
I was stung on my left leg five times by yellow jackets. I have osteoarthritis in my left knee, and the pain has been gone since I was stung. I'm hoping that it will last! If I had a choice, though, I would definitely pick honeybee stings over yellow jackets, as they're much less painful. You're not the first person to share such a story with us. Years ago, a reader wrote: "While snoozing on the porch, I was stung on the finger by a tiny bee. The result: intense pain and, after that, a great reduction of arthritis in my arm."
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 1, 2004
The poor persimmon - so unappreciated, so underrated. "It's a fruit not too many people are comfortable with," says Michel Tersiguel, the chef at Tersiguel's, the French country restaurant in Ellicott City. "You see it on the shelves once a year, you grab it, you try it and you figure once is enough. And that's too bad because there's all sorts of stuff you can do with persimmons when you use your imagination." This late-fall fruit, available at markets into January, generally is associated with baked goods - cookies, bread, pie, cake and especially persimmon pudding.
NEWS
By Tom Osborne and Tom Osborne,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2001
It's more than just the swing. It's more than the player, even if the player is Tiger Woods. When Woods tees off Thursday in this year's U.S. Open Championship in Tulsa, Okla., his caddie will hand him a driver, the club in his bag that when used skillfully will send the golf ball farther than any other club Woods carries. That driver will be a lot different from the ones used 50 years ago, when Ben Hogan was golf's top player. When Hogan hit a drive in the 1940s, spectators would marvel at a ball that carried 250 yards.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 8, 2000
NEW YORK - The mugwort sounds like a villain from a Harry Potter novel, or the name of some plug-ugly in a bad 1930s prison movie. It's not a pretty plant, nor, by plant standards, is it very nice. To reproduce, it's quite capable of giving less aggressive flora an elbow in the eye and a shove toward extinction. The mugwort's a survivor. The persimmon, on the other hand, is every botanist's dream - a civilized and lovely tree that propagates at a leisurely pace, doesn't push out other species and produces a fine-scented blossom.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman , Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2009
Alice Cottle from Fort Bragg, Calif., was looking for a recipe for persimmon bread. Lorraine Hatter from Tremont, Pa., sent in a recipe she found in September/October issue of Good Old Days magazine for the bread. Persimmons are a fall or winter fruit that are very good eaten raw or cooked to make lovely bread when gently spiced with cinnamon and augmented with raisins and chopped walnuts as in this recipe. This bread is moist and delicious, and keeps well for several days so it makes an ideal gift.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2008
Claire Krach of Glen Arm was looking for a recipe for Nancy Reagan's Persimmon Pudding that she said dates to the Reagan White House. Janet Morrissey of Baltimore had the recipe, which was clipped from a newspaper and taped to a recipe card in her mother's recipe box. She says it is a very good dessert that everyone in her family loves. Persimmons are available from October through December. This dense, velvety pudding will make for an elegant and festive finish to any holiday meal. If you are looking for a hard-to-find recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278, or e-mail recipefinder@baltsun.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | March 17, 1999
Rhubarb and persimmon aren't the most common produce, but they're well worth seeking if you think you'd like to try the two recipes in today's column.Joseph T. Hoskins of Rock Hall wrote: "I'd like to find a recipe for an old-fashioned rhubarb cobbler," and Audrey M. White of Reisterstown requested a custard-type rhubarb dish.Most responses were similar. Tester Laura Reiley chose one from Eleanor Harvey of Delmont, Pa., who called her dish a rhubarb crunch.Janet Leih of Canton, S.D., requested a recipe for persimmon pudding.
FEATURES
October 12, 1997
I recently moved here from Minnesota and noticed some tall trees in Druid Hill Park with deep checkered bark and green fruits. Someone told me they are persimmon trees. When should they be harvested? Can I grow any dwarf varieties in my rowhouse back yard?The American persimmon tree is common to our area. The fruits are highly astringent when green. Upon ripening they turn a dull orange color, soften and become very palatable. They can be eaten fresh, although the seeds are large. To enjoy this harvest you'll need to begin foraging on the ground for the dropped fruits beginning in mid-October.
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