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Persian Gulf Crisis

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By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 17, 1990
Airline travelers and those who pay their bills have watched with alarm this fall as the Persian Gulf crisis seemed to move steadily toward war.The conflict has sent oil prices up, but prices for jet fuel have soared far more than have gasoline prices. That, in turn, has caused not only higher air fares -- they are up an average of almost 18 percent since summer -- but also a financial crisis for the airline industry, which already was experiencing a drop in business because of the economy.
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NEWS
By JEFFREY RECORD | March 18, 1992
Washington. -- The White House's decision to employ the Gulf War for partisan advantage is reprehensile, if predictable. Operation Desert Storm's magnificent military accomplishments are now to be dragged through the sewer of election-year politics, cheapening the sacrifice of thousands of American servicemen and women who risked their lives in that conflict.No less reprehensible has been the political timidity of all too many of those who, like insurgent Republican Pat Buchanan, have had their honor and patriotism questioned because they took issue with the Bush administration's behavior during the Persian Gulf crisis that followed Iraq's invasion of Kuwait on Aug. 2, 1990.
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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | January 16, 1991
Politics bore Tina Dayhoff.Even so, the 20-year-old Westminster resident has emerged in recent weeks as one of the more visible student activists on the usually quiet Carroll Community College campus.At both CCC and Western Maryland College, in fact, there has beena resurgence in student activism in the past year. Students have organized --with considerable success -- to seek changes in environmental and administrative policies and to speak out against a slew of other issues, ranging from animal rights to the Persian Gulf crisis.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1991
Monarch Avalon Inc.Upturns in sales of its war games and envelopes helped push long-troubled Monarch Avalon into the black in the quarter that ended Jan. 31.The company, which has lost money for the last four years, said that it benefited from increased interest in its "Gulf Strike" game, which featured a picture of Saddam Hussein on its cover, as well as board games that replay battles from the Civil War and World War II.Jackson Dott, president of Monarch,...
NEWS
December 4, 1990
More than seven out of 10 Evening Sun readers and other callers to SUNDIAL favor President Bush's offer to send Secretary of State James Baker to Iraq to discuss the Persian Gulf crisis. Of 271 callers, 198 (73 percent) said Bush did the right thing and 73 (27 percent) disagreed.Sixty-two percent, or 166 of 269 callers, think the diplomatic move will strengthen the American position in the gulf, while 38 percent (103 callers) think it will weaken the American position."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinion but is not a scientific poll.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev told President Bush yesterday that he was pursuing some new ideas for a diplomatic solution to the Persian Gulf crisis, but the White House was not optimistic about their chances for success.Mr. Gorbachev outlined his proposals to Mr. Bush in a 25-minute telephone call yesterday morning. Soviet Ambassador Alexander Bessmertnykh met twice with the president later in the day to follow up on the discussions.Mr. Bush told reporters the Soviet leader was "thinking innovatively" but would not describe the ideas in detail.
BUSINESS
By Michael Enright and Michael Enright,Special to The Sun | October 22, 1990
The economic picture for Westinghouse Electric Corp.'s Linthicum facility, the county's largest private employer and a major player in the defense industry, won't be greatly affected by the Persian Gulf crisis, experts say, unless the confrontation explodes into a shooting war."Until this thing turns into a real fight, there isn't going to be much of a boon for anyone [in the defense industry] because nobody is consuming anything," said Ron Fraser, an analyst for the Center for Defense Information in Washington.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 6, 1990
The world's airlines agreed yesterday to seek fare increases of up to 8 percent on international flights.The carriers said the higher fares, which would mark the second round of increases since the Persian Gulf crisis began three months ago, are needed because of higher fuel costs.Meeting in Geneva, members of the International Air Transport Association, which represents about 200 airlines, agreed to raise fares by 4 percent to 8 percent.In August, the trade group said it would raise fares 5 percent to 8 percent, an increase some airlines carried out this month.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush may postpone his planned summit in Moscow next month with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, according to White House officials, who say the trip is threatened both by the Persian Gulf crisis and problems in the U.S.-Soviet relationship.The most imminent threat to the meeting, scheduled for Feb. 11-13, is posed by the situation in the gulf. The White House has not ruled out the possibility that Mr. Bush would travel if hostilities were under way, but administration officials said it was unlikely the president would make the trip unless the crisis was close to being resolved.
FEATURES
March 15, 1991
Gulf notebookA town meeting on the continuing Persian Gulf crisis will be held from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. tomorrow in the Gaare Auditorium, Nursing Building, at the New Community College of Baltimore, ++ 2901 Liberty Heights Ave.Speakers from local organizations will discuss the political cost of U.S. military intervention in the gulf, both at home and abroad.The meeting is sponsored by the Baltimore Coalition against U.S. Intervention in the Middle East, the Baltimore Student Coalition against U.S. Intervention in the Middle East, the Student/ Community Alliance, the Baltimore Ministerial Alliance and the Network for Peace in the Middle East.
FEATURES
March 15, 1991
Gulf notebookA town meeting on the continuing Persian Gulf crisis will be held from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. tomorrow in the Gaare Auditorium, Nursing Building, at the New Community College of Baltimore, ++ 2901 Liberty Heights Ave.Speakers from local organizations will discuss the political cost of U.S. military intervention in the gulf, both at home and abroad.The meeting is sponsored by the Baltimore Coalition against U.S. Intervention in the Middle East, the Baltimore Student Coalition against U.S. Intervention in the Middle East, the Student/ Community Alliance, the Baltimore Ministerial Alliance and the Network for Peace in the Middle East.
NEWS
By Diane Winston | February 13, 1991
Millions of Americans will mark the beginning of Lent by dabbing ashes on their foreheads today. But for many more, the Lenten disciplines of prayer and reflection have been a daily routine for the past month."
NEWS
January 27, 1991
In the Jan. 13 issue of The Harford County Sun, we asked readers if they supported military intervention in the Persian Gulf crisis. We are publishing some of those reponses here. All reponses published will be mailed to Harford's congressional representatives, Helen D. Bentley, R-2, and Wayne T. Gilchrest, R-1.WE HAVE PROBLEMS FACING US AT HOMEFrom: M. HartHavre de GraceU.S. should not intervene.The Middle East has always had and will continue to have wars and problems. The concern here is not to save face but to save lives.
NEWS
By A. M. Rosenthal | January 16, 1991
THE NEW World Order was born in Washington on Sept. 11, 1990, and was shot dead in the streets of Vilnius on Jan. 13, 1991.This may seem a sad thing to proclaim as the United States prepares to fight a war from which this new order was supposed to come forth. But the New World Order was an idea conceived in delusion and falsehood, which could have destroyed the very purposes of fighting the war.For the clarity of mind essential to fight a war it is far better that it happened now. The truth can help a war result in a peace of hope, not lead to another war. That is the gift of the people of Vilnius.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | January 16, 1991
Politics bore Tina Dayhoff.Even so, the 20-year-old Westminster resident has emerged in recent weeks as one of the more visible student activists on the usually quiet Carroll Community College campus.At both CCC and Western Maryland College, in fact, there has beena resurgence in student activism in the past year. Students have organized --with considerable success -- to seek changes in environmental and administrative policies and to speak out against a slew of other issues, ranging from animal rights to the Persian Gulf crisis.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev told President Bush yesterday that he was pursuing some new ideas for a diplomatic solution to the Persian Gulf crisis, but the White House was not optimistic about their chances for success.Mr. Gorbachev outlined his proposals to Mr. Bush in a 25-minute telephone call yesterday morning. Soviet Ambassador Alexander Bessmertnykh met twice with the president later in the day to follow up on the discussions.Mr. Bush told reporters the Soviet leader was "thinking innovatively" but would not describe the ideas in detail.
NEWS
January 27, 1991
In the Jan. 13 issue of The Harford County Sun, we asked readers if they supported military intervention in the Persian Gulf crisis. We are publishing some of those reponses here. All reponses published will be mailed to Harford's congressional representatives, Helen D. Bentley, R-2, and Wayne T. Gilchrest, R-1.WE HAVE PROBLEMS FACING US AT HOMEFrom: M. HartHavre de GraceU.S. should not intervene.The Middle East has always had and will continue to have wars and problems. The concern here is not to save face but to save lives.
NEWS
By Stephen E. Nordlinger and Stephen E. Nordlinger,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 25, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Finance ministers from throughout the world agreed yesterday to mobilize billions of dollars to shore up poor nations threatened by the Persian Gulf crisis, with a large part going to the front-line nations of Jordan, Egypt and Turkey.Administration officials said $12 billion to $14 billion would be needed to bolster the economies of those three nations through the end of the year, far more than the $10.5 billion estimated three weeks ago.As the chief reason for raising the estimate, officials cited skyrocketing oil prices -- which climbed $2.82 a barrel in New York yesterday to reach $38.25, the highest level in almost 10 years.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush may postpone his planned summit in Moscow next month with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, according to White House officials, who say the trip is threatened both by the Persian Gulf crisis and problems in the U.S.-Soviet relationship.The most imminent threat to the meeting, scheduled for Feb. 11-13, is posed by the situation in the gulf. The White House has not ruled out the possibility that Mr. Bush would travel if hostilities were under way, but administration officials said it was unlikely the president would make the trip unless the crisis was close to being resolved.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 4, 1991
AMMAN, Jordan -- Having already suffered serious damage to its economy because of the Persian Gulf crisis, Jordan finds itself in increasing danger of becoming a major battlefield if war erupts between Iraq and U.S.-led forces.If fighting begins, Iraq has threatened to launch missiles against Israel, and Israel has promised to retaliate. Either country, if it used the most direct route, would have to cross Jordanian territory or airspace.As the buffer state between Iraq and Israel, Jordan would have to choose between allowing its neighbors to violate its territory without being punished or taking military action that could draw the kingdom more deeply into the conflict.
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