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By JANICE BAKER | October 14, 1990
Many restaurants have been experiencing hard times in recent months. People have been holding on to their money more, they're eating at home, and/or they're subsisting on an eternity of pizzas. Into this feastsout, frugality-in atmosphere, at least three glorious new ethnic places have opened in one year: Thai Landing and the Helmand (Afghan), both on Charles Street, and Orchard Market, a Persian cafe in Towson. All three serve interesting, beautifully prepared food at low prices, and should draw any world-weary, penny-pinching food cynic back out into the world of public dining.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
The Rev. John T. Carter, a retired Roman Catholic Navy chaplain who later pastored several churches in Western Maryland, died Tuesday at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center of respiratory failure. He was 71. "Our Uncle Martin Hyland was a priest, and I think he was somewhat of an influence on my brother as well as the priest at St. Ambrose," his sister, Sally Louise Protokowicz of Bel Air, said. "Since he was 14, he always wanted to be a priest. It was the only thing he ever wanted to do. " The son of Blight G. Carter, a Baltimore Sun photoengraver, and Agnes L. Hyland, a homemaker, John Thomas Carter, one of seven children, was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Pimlico neighborhood.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | March 17, 1993
Najmieh Batmanglij has been cooking all morning, and the kitchen of her Georgetown home is filled with wonderful aromas -- the sharp, citrus smell of Seville oranges, the nutty smell of roasting rice, the pungent and seductive smell of garlic sizzling in olive oil.Mrs. Batmanglij, author of the Persian cookbook "New Food of Life" (Mage Publishers, $44.95), is preparing for a noontime visitor and a few dinner guests. "I like to feed people," she says, filling a glass with a refreshing drink made from rhubarb syrup.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
Ozra, a promising new Persian-Mediterranean restaurant, opened quietly in Little Italy back in early July. It's co-owned by Reza Holland and Mahrdad "Max" Tabasi, who have invested a lot of time, thought and, from the looks of things, money in their renovation of what had been an old bakery building just a few steps down from Vaccaro's Italian Pastry Shop. Can't quite picture where this is? Don't feel bad. This block of Stiles Street doesn't get a ton of foot traffic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | August 18, 1995
It's like a joke: I'll have the kabob, waiter. Very good. And what will you have, ma'am? Oh, I think I'll have the kabob. And you, sir? I'll have -- let's see -- I'll have the kabob. And you, sir? Have you decided? Maybe I'll . . . no . . . I guess I'll have the kabob.As Henry Ford said, at the House of Kabob you can have any dish you want as long as it's a kabob.That's not quite true: there is one appetizer, one soup, some salad, a couple of desserts. But the only main courses on the short menu are skewered meats and vegetables.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | July 23, 1993
Cochini is Baltimore's first Italian-Persian restaurant. In fact, it may be the only Italian-Persian restaurant in the world. It's not exactly an idea whose time has come.Don't get me wrong. This isn't a combination of cuisines like the Orchid's French-Chinese dishes. No fettucine fesenjune. Cochini's owner, who left Iran 14 years ago, wanted a backup for those who don't eat Persian food. Italian is as good as any, I guess.The problem is that the Italian food we tried was almost inedible, while the Persian dishes were fine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | July 3, 2005
From childhood, Majnum burned with passion for the beautiful Layla, and she returned his devotion. But because the couple could not marry, Majnum went mad and wandered through the wilderness clad only in rags. Then Majnum's friend, seeking to test Layla's love, told her Majnum was dead. This news broke Layla's heart, and she perished from grief. When Majnum arrived at her funeral, so overcome with remorse was he that he leapt into the grave beside his beloved and died on the spot. This tragic tale of star-crossed lovers forms the central chapter of the Khamsa -- or quintet of tales -- by Amir Khusraw, a 13th-century Persian-language poet known as "the Parrot of India."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 2003
Good luck finding the Orchard Market and Cafe if you don't know where to look. It's tucked in the back of a Towson strip mall, invisible from the street. Yet, with no liquor license and no signs to attract drive-by traffic, this little Persian restaurant has managed to survive, and even thrive, since opening in 1988. A large part of the restaurant's appeal is probably its obscurity. People like to discover hidden treasures. However, obscurity alone wouldn't keep this restaurant going.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
For thousands of years, the people of ancient Persia and their descendants in modern Iran have called it the Persian Gulf. But the National Geographic Society's mapmakers noticed that some U.S. military agencies and other map gazers use the name Arabian Gulf for the body of water on Iran's southwestern shore. So they altered the eighth edition of the society's influential Atlas of the World to include Arabian Gulf as an alternate name (in parentheses) under the traditional title. That has landed them in hot water with Iranians from Los Angeles to Tehran.
NEWS
January 24, 1991
PERSIAN GULF SHOWDOWN
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
The line "treated like family" gets tossed around a lot when it comes to restaurants. But rarely do you feel that comfortable or connected by the time you pay the check. Orchard Market & Cafe in Towson doesn't just make you feel at home — it also serves up a first-rate Persian meal. Hidden in the back of a strip mall off of Joppa Road, Orchard Market is almost impossible to find — unless you know where to look. It's a testament to the restaurant that it has been open for 22 years despite such a terrible location.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Tribune Newspapers | April 13, 2011
The Passover Seder offers a ritualized retelling of how the Israelites were delivered from bondage in Egypt. Even today, more than 3,000 years later, it's quite a story. There's also quite a story behind a new kosher cookbook, "Persian Food from the Non-Persian Bride" (Feldheim, $34.99), whose subtitle promises "And Other Kosher Sephardic Recipes You Will Love!"The author is Reyna Simnegar, a mother of five boys ages 2 to 9 living in Brookline, Mass., whose Persian husband loves real Persian cooking.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
Rear Adm. Michael H. Miller, the president's nominee to be the U.S. Naval Academy's next superintendent, flew combat missions into Libya, led aircraft carrier groups to the Persian Gulf and worked four years in the White House before taking his current job as the Navy's chief of legislative affairs. If confirmed by the Senate, Miller will replace Superintendent Jeffrey Fowler, who has led the academy for three years. Fowler will retire, according to the Department of Defense, but he has not announced a date of departure.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | July 4, 2009
John Harbaugh is experiencing a different level of patriotism on this Fourth of July weekend. The Ravens coach is in the middle of the inaugural NFL-USO Coaches Tour of the Persian Gulf, where he has already met nearly 6,000 troops on the morale-boosting trip. Harbaugh has signed autographs, taken pictures and shared stories while feeling the pride of the U.S. soldiers in the Middle East. "This is something I've never dreamed of experiencing," Harbaugh said Friday from Iraq, where he is touring with the New York Giants' Tom Coughlin, Tennessee Titans' Jeff Fisher and former coaches Bill Cowher and Jon Gruden.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | June 9, 2009
The NFL announced Monday that Ravens coach John Harbaugh will be one of five current and former league coaches who will travel this month to the Persian Gulf region to meet with service members on the inaugural NFL-USO Coaches Tour. New York Giants coach Tom Coughlin, Tennessee Titans coach Jeff Fisher, former Pittsburgh Steelers coach Bill Cowher and former Los Angeles Raiders and Tampa Bay Buccaneers coach Jon Gruden will join Harbaugh on the trip, expected to last several days. During the past four decades, according to the league, NFL stars including Terry Bradshaw, Larry Csonka, Franco Harris, Howie Long, Don Meredith, Lynn Swann and Johnny Unitas have visited U.S. troops in locations including Afghanistan, Bosnia, Iraq, Japan, Korea, Kuwait, Somalia and Vietnam.
NEWS
By Bob Drogin and Bob Drogin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 24, 2007
VIENNA, Austria -- Defying the international community, Iran has sharply upgraded its capacity to enrich uranium in recent months while the outside world's access to and grasp of Iran's nuclear program "has deteriorated," according to a unusually blunt report yesterday by the International Atomic Energy Agency. As two U.S. aircraft carriers and a flotilla of warships steamed into the Persian Gulf for previously unannounced exercises, the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency warned that it could not "provide assurances about ... the exclusively peaceful nature" of Iran's expanding nuclear effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | September 8, 1995
By the time you read this, the new bar at 1200 N. Charles St., Harry's, should be serving food -- what owner Harry Dahl calls "upscale pub grub": soups, salads, sandwiches and appetizers. Harry's also features four micro-brews on tap and more than 50 "in the cooler."* You'd expect a restaurant called Fisherman's Island to have seafood, but Persian cuisine? In a Towson Ramada Inn dining room? Owner Arman Shahbazi has hired two Persian chefs to prepare authentic dishes; he also promises the only Persian nightclub in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Ramin Mostaghim and Kim Murphy | April 2, 2007
TEHRAN, Iran -- More than 150 students pelted the British Embassy here with firecrackers and a smoke grenade yesterday, demanding an apology and the closure of the mission after Iran's detention of 15 British sailors and marines in the northern Persian Gulf. Shouting slogans such as "Death to Britain" and carrying banners with a call to "finally wipe Israel from the face of the Earth," hard-line Islamist students attempted to scale the embassy walls and pull down the flag but were rebuffed by riot police.
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