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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 9, 1997
TAMPA, Fla. -- A federal immigration court judge has granted asylum to a German member of the Church of Scientology who said she would be subjected to religious persecution had she been required to return to her homeland, the woman's lawyer and a Scientology official said Friday.While few details were available, it is believed to be the first time the United States has given asylum protection to a Scientologist.The Church of Scientology has been waging a highly public international campaign against what it considers discrimination against its members by the German government.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 20, 2013
Of course the president deserves some of the blame. Yes, it's extremely unlikely he ordered the IRS to discriminate against tea party, pro-life or Jewish groups opposed to his agenda (though why anyone should take his word for it is beyond me). And his outrage now -- however convenient -- is appreciated. But when people he views as his "enemies" complained about a politicized IRS, what did he do? Nothing. Imagine for a moment if black civil rights organizations, gay groups or teachers unions loudly complained to members of Congress and the press that the IRS was discriminating against them.
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By Adam Choppin | May 20, 2001
IN RECENT MONTHS, the 46-year-old conflict in Sudan has received renewed attention in American newspapers regarding the persecution of Southern Sudanese Christians by radical Northern Sudanese Muslims. Unfortunately, this gross oversimplification threatens to stoke the embers of religious fanaticism and make the world's deadliest and longest-running war even deadlier. The complex factors that divide the people of the Sudan (north and south) have given rise to two prolonged wars during most of the second half of the past century.
NEWS
August 27, 2011
I was deeply saddened to read of yet another tragic senseless killing in our city, this time of a Bhutanese refugee who fled his own country due to persecution of his people. ("Bhutanese refugee in city two months is killed in robbery," Aug. 25). How is it that we as Baltimoreans continue to be persecuted by indiscriminate armed thugs and appear powerless to stop them? Where is our homeland security? Stuart R. Varon, Lutherville
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 20, 2013
Of course the president deserves some of the blame. Yes, it's extremely unlikely he ordered the IRS to discriminate against tea party, pro-life or Jewish groups opposed to his agenda (though why anyone should take his word for it is beyond me). And his outrage now -- however convenient -- is appreciated. But when people he views as his "enemies" complained about a politicized IRS, what did he do? Nothing. Imagine for a moment if black civil rights organizations, gay groups or teachers unions loudly complained to members of Congress and the press that the IRS was discriminating against them.
NEWS
August 27, 2011
I was deeply saddened to read of yet another tragic senseless killing in our city, this time of a Bhutanese refugee who fled his own country due to persecution of his people. ("Bhutanese refugee in city two months is killed in robbery," Aug. 25). How is it that we as Baltimoreans continue to be persecuted by indiscriminate armed thugs and appear powerless to stop them? Where is our homeland security? Stuart R. Varon, Lutherville
NEWS
By Mona Charen | December 11, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Lai Man Peng was a 22-year-old Chinese Christian evangelist. In 1994, at a meeting of one of China's "house churches" (a non-government-sanctioned prayer meeting), he and four other evangelists were seized by agents of the Public Security Bureau, China's feared secret police.In front of the congregation, Mr. Lai and the others were beaten severely. The security officers next handed the truncheons to the congregants and ordered them to beat the preachers, on pain of being beaten themselves.
NEWS
By Jeff Jacoby | December 26, 1996
BOSTON -- ''Fear not: for behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy.'' Every Christian knows what the angel said to those shepherds 20 centuries ago as a baby lay sleeping in a Bethlehem manger.Here in America, where the most powerful community of Christians in history dwells in peace and prosperity, the story of Jesus has indeed proved a fount of good tidings and great joy. ''Fear not,'' the angel said. But in this rich and blessed place, Christians need not fear. Their freedom to worship is unchallenged; their religious liberty is enshrined in law.But for millions of Christians in other lands, fear is ever-present.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 5, 2010
Ruth Kutscher, who fled Nazi Germany and after settling in Baltimore later established a business selling modern furniture, accessories and gifts, died Friday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 91. Ruth Lowenthal, the daughter of well known horse traders, was born and raised in Linnich, Germany, a suburb of Aachen, where she was also educated. Mrs. Kutscher was able to leave Germany and Nazi persecution with the help of Myer Strauss, the Baltimore philanthropist and president of Strauss Brothers Dry Goods Inc. and the Standard Textile Co. Inc., who had acted as her sponsor.
NEWS
September 27, 1994
The visit of Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams to the United States makes perfectly clear that this political leader, supported by 10 percent of the voters in Northern Ireland and perhaps 5 percent in all Ireland, is free to make his case in this country. He will return to the United Kingdom and not be persecuted there for what he will have said here.That destroys the rationale offered by Judge Barbara Caulfield of U.S. District Court in San Francisco for rejecting the extradition of Jimmy Smyth to Britain.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 5, 2010
Ruth Kutscher, who fled Nazi Germany and after settling in Baltimore later established a business selling modern furniture, accessories and gifts, died Friday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 91. Ruth Lowenthal, the daughter of well known horse traders, was born and raised in Linnich, Germany, a suburb of Aachen, where she was also educated. Mrs. Kutscher was able to leave Germany and Nazi persecution with the help of Myer Strauss, the Baltimore philanthropist and president of Strauss Brothers Dry Goods Inc. and the Standard Textile Co. Inc., who had acted as her sponsor.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | July 13, 2008
Carol "Lenka" Katz, who survived the Nazi persecutions in Slovakia with an assumed identity and with assistance from Christian friends who hid her and her baby son, died July 6 of complications from an infection at a hospital in Jerusalem. The former Northwest Baltimore resident was 95. Carol Leah Bernstein was born into a Hasidic family in Bardiov, a small town in eastern Slovakia, then a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After graduating from high school and a business school, she went to work as a secretary for an industrial firm in Bratislava.
NEWS
By SOLOMON MOORE AND SUHAIL AHMAD and SOLOMON MOORE AND SUHAIL AHMAD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 8, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Iraqi authorities released nearly 600 prisoners yesterday out of a total of 2,500 scheduled to be freed this week in an effort to appease Sunni Arabs who say their sect has been unjustly persecuted by Iraq's police force. A witness of one mass release at a Baghdad bus station said that prisoners and their families wept at the sight of one another. Some of the prisoners looked wan and undernourished. A few struggled to walk without help. Khayrulla Ibrahim Mohammed, 37, a laborer and member of the Sunni-led Iraqi Islamic Party was freed after spending five months in Abu Ghraib and a year in Camp Bucca.
NEWS
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2005
Harvard's Secret Court: The Savage 1920 Purge of Campus Homosexuals William Wright St. Martin's Press / 294 pages One spring night 85 years ago, a Harvard student named Cyril Wilcox lay in bed, breathing deeply. Gas flowed from an open jet in his room. By morning, he was dead. Thanks to some incriminating letters, Wilcox's older brother, Lester, thought he knew exactly whom to blame for the apparent suicide: a circle of homosexual Harvard students, who, he believed, had seduced his innocent brother into a life of debauchery and perversion.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2005
Advocates for immigrants seeking asylum in the United States fear that new federal legislation will make it more difficult for people trying to escape foreign torture because of their ethnicity, race or religion. The measure -- known as the Real ID Act and tacked onto a recent Iraq spending bill -- would require immigration judges to base their asylum decisions, in part, on a person's "demeanor." Therapist Joachim Nthawie -- who works with clients from such countries as Cameroon, Ethiopia and Indonesia -- said emotion can be hard to see in people traumatized by torture, electric shock or rape.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 2004
NEW YORK - Cendana Wirasari Adiwarga sat perfectly still, her eyes shut tight as Quincy Sun dragged a toothpick soaked with fake blood across her plump left cheek. "There, all done," Sun said, appraising her handiwork. Adiwarga's smooth skin had been transformed into a garish tableau of bloody cuts and bruises. Adiwarga then rose to take her place inside a metal cage, where she planned to sit for three hours on a blustery late October morning opposite a federal courthouse in Lower Manhattan.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | November 19, 1998
NOT SINCE the first Christian faced the lions in the Roman Coliseum has one man entered so dangerous an arena as independent counsel Kenneth Starr does when he appears before the House Judiciary Committee today. So here's my advice, Mr. Starr, based on my own experience having served on the Judiciary Committee staff during the Nixon impeachment inquiry and having testified before the committee numerous times.The most important thing to remember is that these hearings are not a trial before an impartial judge or jury expected to render a fair verdict based on the evidence.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The persecution of Christians around the world finally got some attention the other day when a ''Freedom From Religious Persecution Act'' was introduced in the Senate by Arlen Specter, R-Pa., who is Jewish, and in the House by Rep. Frank Wolf, R-Va., who is an evangelical Christian.The man responsible for drafting the legislation, Michael Horowitz, is also Jewish, and a former top Reagan-administration official. Columnist A.M. Rosenthal of the New York Times, who is Jewish, is a strong supporter.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2003
During Holy Week observances in Westminster, a Sudanese bishop will preach on the passion of Jesus Christ and the plight of Christians in war-ravaged Sudan. The Rev. Nathaniel Garang, bishop of the Bor diocese of the Episcopal Church in Sudan, said he hopes to raise U.S. awareness that his homeland has endured nearly four decades of civil strife and that the Islamic government has persecuted Christians. "I will preach Christ, how he came and suffered for us," said Garang, who has been in the United States since January.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2003
During Holy Week observances in Westminster, a Sudanese bishop will preach on the passion of Jesus Christ and the plight of Christians in war-ravaged Sudan. The Rev. Nathaniel Garang, bishop of the Bor diocese of the Episcopal Church in Sudan, said he hopes to raise U.S. awareness that his homeland has endured nearly four decades of civil strife and that the Islamic government has persecuted Christians. "I will preach Christ, how he came and suffered for us," said Garang, who has been in the United States since January.
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