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Perry Farrell

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Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
This year in particular should be a time of reflection for Perry Farrell, and yet the lead singer of Jane's Addiction can only seem to think ahead. In late August, “Nothing's Shocking” - the Los Angeles quartet's first studio album that helped lead alternative rock, with singles like “Jane Says” and “Mountain Song,” to its fruitful '90s - turned 25. Following a current touring trend, Jane's Addiction performed the record in its entirety earlier this year in Las Vegas and England.
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Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
This year in particular should be a time of reflection for Perry Farrell, and yet the lead singer of Jane's Addiction can only seem to think ahead. In late August, “Nothing's Shocking” - the Los Angeles quartet's first studio album that helped lead alternative rock, with singles like “Jane Says” and “Mountain Song,” to its fruitful '90s - turned 25. Following a current touring trend, Jane's Addiction performed the record in its entirety earlier this year in Las Vegas and England.
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By Karen Keys | June 26, 1997
Six years ago, when Perry Farrell and his cohorts launched a traveling musical festival of alternative bands, everyone who didn't watch MTV 10 hours a day responded, "La-la-pah-whatta?" Now the strange word is practically a household name and summer music festivals fill the concert listings of every newspaper. Last year, typical Lollapalooza-goers abandoned ship when the sound turned too heavy, giving it the nickname "metalpalooza." Farrell was also less involved with the planning, and the result was nearly devastating.
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By Jim Abbott and Jim Abbott,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 31, 2003
It would be too much to ask for Strays, the first Jane's Addiction studio effort since 1990's fondly remembered Ritual de lo Habitual, to assert itself with the impact of "Been Caught Stealing" or "Jane Says." There are enough essential elements - churning guitars, ebullient choruses, explosive rhythms and Perry Farrell's high tenor - to make these 11 songs better than one might expect. Even if the result is a little too formulaic to be the potent concoction it once was, it still makes guitarist Dave Navarro's less ambitious solo work and Farrell's dabbling with electronica and Eastern music look like so much wasted energy.
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By Jim Abbott and Jim Abbott,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 31, 2003
It would be too much to ask for Strays, the first Jane's Addiction studio effort since 1990's fondly remembered Ritual de lo Habitual, to assert itself with the impact of "Been Caught Stealing" or "Jane Says." There are enough essential elements - churning guitars, ebullient choruses, explosive rhythms and Perry Farrell's high tenor - to make these 11 songs better than one might expect. Even if the result is a little too formulaic to be the potent concoction it once was, it still makes guitarist Dave Navarro's less ambitious solo work and Farrell's dabbling with electronica and Eastern music look like so much wasted energy.
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By Rashod D. Ollison | July 31, 2003
Mariah Carey / Merriweather Behind Whitney Houston and Barbra Streisand, Mariah Carey is one of the most commercially successful female singers in pop. Her overblown ballads and hip-hop-lite up-tempo numbers have pushed sales of such albums as Music Box, Rainbow and the latest Charmbracelet to multiplatinum heights. She plays Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia on Tuesday night. Show starts at 8, and tickets are $35-$65, available via Ticketmaster by calling 410-481-SEAT or visiting www.ticketmaster.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 24, 1998
Oh, my God! They recorded Kenny!No, we're not talking Kenny Rogers here, or even Kenny G. We're talking Kenny McCormick, the mumbling, frequently decapitated elementary schooler whose death is a weekly occurrence on the Comedy Central cartoon "South Park."Of course, anyone who either watches the show or has children in middle school already knows that. Many may also know that Kenny's recording debut comes courtesy of "Chef Aid: The South Park Album" (Columbia/American 69377, arriving in stores today)
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | April 30, 1993
EXPOSEDVince Neil (Warner Bros. 45260)If the name Vince Neil doesn't ring any bells, it's probably because the former Motley Crue front man was usually overshadowed by the band's bassist, the charismatic and controversial Nikki Sixx. Now that he's on his own, you might think Neil would want to keep his first solo album focused squarely on himself. Yet not only does "Exposed" allow guitarist Steve Stevens to steal the spotlight from time to time, but the music is the better for it. Why? In part because Stevens' solos are stunningly original, but mostly because he and Neil share the same goal -- to make these songs as exciting as possible.
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By Betty Webb and Betty Webb,Cox News Service | September 20, 1991
MENTION alternative music and many people conjure up visions of Jane's Addiction, with lead singer Perry Farrell passing out into the drums.Or worse.But alternative music has many faces, not all of them strange. There are the art-rock enthusiasms of Pere Ubu, the lyricism of The Candy Skins, the strong melody line of Chapterhouse and the psycho-folksiness of Richard Thompson.And even the hilarious "theater criticism" of Crowded House, whose single "Chocolate Cake" takes a few below-the-belt potshots at composer Andrew Lloyd Webber.
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By Jim Farber and Jim Farber,New York Daily News | August 5, 1994
Lollapalooza lumbers into Charles Town, W.Va., Monday with a big fat albatross around its neck. Despite a lineup that boasts some of the biggest names in the music business -- Smashing Pumpkins, Beastie Boys, etc. -- this yearly event still finds itself burdened by its original ambitions. People still expect Lollapalooza to represent an edgy, underground be-in for superfreaks.Dream on.Even Lollapalooza's organizers agree, four years in, that it's time to stop looking to rock's original "alternative" festival for anything alternative.
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By Karen Keys | June 26, 1997
Six years ago, when Perry Farrell and his cohorts launched a traveling musical festival of alternative bands, everyone who didn't watch MTV 10 hours a day responded, "La-la-pah-whatta?" Now the strange word is practically a household name and summer music festivals fill the concert listings of every newspaper. Last year, typical Lollapalooza-goers abandoned ship when the sound turned too heavy, giving it the nickname "metalpalooza." Farrell was also less involved with the planning, and the result was nearly devastating.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 14, 1992
To hear people in the concert business tell it, the Lollapalooza concept has been the greatest innovation in packaging since cheese in a can.At first glance, it hardly seems like blockbuster material. Built around a rag-tag jumble of alternative rock acts, neither Lollapalooza package has had much in the way of mainstream star-power. The lineup for Lollapalooza '92, for instance, features Lush, Pearl Jam, the Jesus and Mary Chain, Soundgarden, Ice Cube and Ministry, with the Red Hot Chili Peppers headlining.
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By Anne Miller and Anne Miller,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- When Richard Gere arrived backstage at the rally on the West Lawn of the Capitol yesterday, he found an unusual contingent amid his typical gaggle of groupies. Jockeying for position alongside the reporters, photographers and autograph-seekers were several Tibetan monks -- strikingly separate with their shaven heads and long, maroon robes, but just as eagerly trying to snap a few shots of the outspoken actor.Such were the contrasts on the steps of the Capitol as musicians known for lyrics such as "That's me in the spotlight, losing my religion" mingled with Buddhists who otherwise try to lead a quiet, peaceful life, all in the name of tossing off the mantle of Chinese rule over an area few in the audience knew much about before last weekend's Tibetan Freedom Concert brought the issue to their attention.
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