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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
While trainer Frank Alexander was enjoying views of the Grand Tetons on horseback yesterday, jockey Craig Perret was experiencing another kind of exhilarating ride at Laurel Race Course.Perret felt the sensation of overpowering a crack field of sprinters on the Alexander-trained Cherokee Run and won the $300,000 Frank J. De Francis Dash in near stakes-record time.It was Perret's second victory in the Grade II sprint in four years. He won on Housebuster in 1991, establishing a stakes record for six furlongs of 1 minute, 8 3/5 seconds that is shared with last year's winner, Montbrook.
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FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2005
NEW YORK - Fashion Week is in full and fabulous swing. For five jam-packed days out of this style-setting eight days, dozens of the top names in American fashion have shown off their best offerings for the fast-approaching fall season. And as in the past two seasons of ladylike and light and airy styles, designers have gone for all things pretty and feminine. But this time, they added a little more. More volume. More layers. More embellishments. More fur. If last fall was ladylike, this fall will be ladylike luxe.
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SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | September 10, 1990
Craig Perret looks like a man on a mission.At 39, he's on the brink of middle age and has certainly reached the time when most athletes have passed their peak.But Perret has never ridden better. His confidence and poise, much in evidence yesterday at the Maryland Million, had virtually gone unnoticed nationally until at the ripe old age of 36, he won the 1987 Belmont Stakes with Bet Twice.Up to that point, he was just another rider in New Jersey. Now he's one of the most sought-after stakes jockeys in the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,Special to the Sun | October 17, 1999
"Eisenhower," by Geoffrey Perret. Random House. 672 pages. $35. Like George Washington and Ulysses S. Grant before him, Dwight D. Eisenhower marched into the presidency after having led to victory the greatest military forces his nation could muster. Unlike Washington, he rose to the heights from a humble beginning. Unlike Grant, he made a success of his years in the White House. He has risen steadily in the estimation of historians, moving from a lackluster 22nd of 31 presidents in a 1962 listing to eighth of 41 presidents in a 1994 Siena Research Institute poll.
SPORTS
By Dale Austin | December 2, 1990
Jockey Craig Perret was in Pennsylvania on a hunting trip last week when his agent, Roger Sutton, began campaigning for a 1990 Eclipse Award.Sutton knows some of the habits of Eclipse Award voters. Many of those who vote -- Daily Racing Form employees, the nation's racing secretaries and members of the National Turf Writers Association -- pay close attention to the performances of the horses they vote for but never look past the top of the standings for jockeys, trainers and owners when casting their ballots for those awards.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 17, 1992
Craig Perret emerged from the shower in the jockeys' room wearing a white robe, a cigarette and a small smile. A reporter asked him how it felt."You ever write a bad story?" he answered. "Ever write a bad one and then it's too late and you can't get it back? That's how it feels."He folded his arms. Brushed back his wet hair with his hands. Left his cigarette dangling on a table. What, you wanted him to cry?"I'm gonna go home and eat and sleep and be fine," Perret said. "I did what I did. I picked the wrong horse.
SPORTS
By Dale Austin | September 10, 1990
Timely Warning held off his more highly regarded stablemate Master Speaker in the stretch at Pimlico Race Course yesterday and won the $200,000 Budweiser Maryland Classic.The victory for Timely Warning, ridden by Craig Perret, headed the fifth Maryland Million Day program limited to offspring of Maryland sires. The card yesterday attracted 22,108 customers and $2,257,892; it was the event's second-highest crowd and the third-best mutuel handle.The victory in the feature gave Perret a 3-2 edge over Julie Kronin a friendly rivalry between the two jockeys from the New York/New Jersey circuit.
SPORTS
By New York Daily News | August 26, 1991
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- Housebuster, an Eclipse Award-winning sprinter, took yesterday's $115,800 Forego Handicap at Saratoga Race Course by a nose over 32-1 shot Senor Speedy.The second-place finisher broke a step slowly and still managed to get his head in front a jump before the wire. He lost the bob of the head at the finish but may have been the best horse."It was a tough race," said winning trainer Jimmy Croll. "I thought we got beat; I thought he got us in the last jump."Housebuster, who had been rated in his last start, a win in the Frank De Francis Memorial Dash at Laurel Race Course, was urged from the gate by rider Craig Perret.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
Two months ago, the racing future of Alydeed seemed, at best, uncertain. After chipping a bone in an ankle last year, the promising Canadian horse came down with a serious lung infection.So, yesterday, when Alydeed lost its lead to Pine Bluff down the stretch to finish second in the Preakness, there was very little disappointment. Alydeed's bumpy past didn't seem as important what jockey Craig Perret called "a very bright future.""I doubt very much you've seen the best of this horse," said Bob Anderson, who bred Alydeed for owner Donald G. Wilmot, the TC chairman of The Molsons Cos. Limited.
NEWS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | May 16, 1993
Sometimes it pays to be tongue-tied. Just ask El Bakan, a 51-1 shot, who finished a surprising third in the 118th Preakness yesterday at Pimlico Race Course.Labeled the "Panamanian wonder" after winning seven straight races in that country, El Bakan was called "El Floppo" after finishing 18th, 27 lengths behind winning Sea Hero, in the Kentucky Derby two weeks ago.But owner Robert Perez and veteran trainer Alfredo Callejas, who first joined forces in Argentina 30 years ago, knew this was not the real El Bakan.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
Age was no barrier to Smoke Glacken yesterday at Laurel Park.In his first test against older horses, the nation's premier 3-year-old sprinter led from start to finish and won the eighth running of the Grade II, $300,000 De Francis Memorial Dash by 1 1/2 lengths.The 2-5 favorite thus stamped another credential onto his claim for an Eclipse Award as Sprinter of the Year.Withdrawn from Triple Crown consideration because he wasn't prepared for distance running, Smoke Glacken may now be pointed toward the Breeders' Cup sprint; he would have to be supplemented into the race.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
While trainer Frank Alexander was enjoying views of the Grand Tetons on horseback yesterday, jockey Craig Perret was experiencing another kind of exhilarating ride at Laurel Race Course.Perret felt the sensation of overpowering a crack field of sprinters on the Alexander-trained Cherokee Run and won the $300,000 Frank J. De Francis Dash in near stakes-record time.It was Perret's second victory in the Grade II sprint in four years. He won on Housebuster in 1991, establishing a stakes record for six furlongs of 1 minute, 8 3/5 seconds that is shared with last year's winner, Montbrook.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | October 3, 1993
Craig Perret had a grander scheme in mind yesterday when he took off Allen Paulson's Cleone in the Damascus Handicap at Pimlico Race Course and opted to ride Canadian champion 3-year-old Peteski in the $750,000 Super Derby at Louisiana Downs.Instead New Jersey-based jockey Joe Bravo substituted for Perret at Old Hilltop and won the $113,650 turf race.Even though Peteski finished third in Louisiana, Perret didn't fare too badly. His mount picked up $82,500 show money compared to the $68,190 Cleone earned for winning at Pimlico.
NEWS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | May 16, 1993
Sometimes it pays to be tongue-tied. Just ask El Bakan, a 51-1 shot, who finished a surprising third in the 118th Preakness yesterday at Pimlico Race Course.Labeled the "Panamanian wonder" after winning seven straight races in that country, El Bakan was called "El Floppo" after finishing 18th, 27 lengths behind winning Sea Hero, in the Kentucky Derby two weeks ago.But owner Robert Perez and veteran trainer Alfredo Callejas, who first joined forces in Argentina 30 years ago, knew this was not the real El Bakan.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
Two months ago, the racing future of Alydeed seemed, at best, uncertain. After chipping a bone in an ankle last year, the promising Canadian horse came down with a serious lung infection.So, yesterday, when Alydeed lost its lead to Pine Bluff down the stretch to finish second in the Preakness, there was very little disappointment. Alydeed's bumpy past didn't seem as important what jockey Craig Perret called "a very bright future.""I doubt very much you've seen the best of this horse," said Bob Anderson, who bred Alydeed for owner Donald G. Wilmot, the TC chairman of The Molsons Cos. Limited.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 17, 1992
Craig Perret emerged from the shower in the jockeys' room wearing a white robe, a cigarette and a small smile. A reporter asked him how it felt."You ever write a bad story?" he answered. "Ever write a bad one and then it's too late and you can't get it back? That's how it feels."He folded his arms. Brushed back his wet hair with his hands. Left his cigarette dangling on a table. What, you wanted him to cry?"I'm gonna go home and eat and sleep and be fine," Perret said. "I did what I did. I picked the wrong horse.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2005
NEW YORK - Fashion Week is in full and fabulous swing. For five jam-packed days out of this style-setting eight days, dozens of the top names in American fashion have shown off their best offerings for the fast-approaching fall season. And as in the past two seasons of ladylike and light and airy styles, designers have gone for all things pretty and feminine. But this time, they added a little more. More volume. More layers. More embellishments. More fur. If last fall was ladylike, this fall will be ladylike luxe.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
Age was no barrier to Smoke Glacken yesterday at Laurel Park.In his first test against older horses, the nation's premier 3-year-old sprinter led from start to finish and won the eighth running of the Grade II, $300,000 De Francis Memorial Dash by 1 1/2 lengths.The 2-5 favorite thus stamped another credential onto his claim for an Eclipse Award as Sprinter of the Year.Withdrawn from Triple Crown consideration because he wasn't prepared for distance running, Smoke Glacken may now be pointed toward the Breeders' Cup sprint; he would have to be supplemented into the race.
SPORTS
By Clark Spencer and Clark Spencer,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 27, 1992
As the Kentucky Derby goes, the one in 1991 was just ordinary. Strike the Gold won, then never won again. Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, fresh from battle, was the highlight. The year before, Frances Genter in her polka-dot dress received as much publicity as Unbridled."Each Derby seems to have its own character," said Tom Meeker, president of Churchill Downs. "Last year, it was Schwarzkopf. It was a real coup getting him there. But the character this year, the real fabric of this year's Derby, is the horse."
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 3, 1991
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- For Housebuster and his connections, it was a terrible way to end a superb career. And for the thousands of fans who backed him, it was a terrible way to begin the national Pick-7.Housebuster, the 2-5 favorite, grabbed a short lead into the stretch in yesterday's Breeders' Cup Sprint, but it was another ,, grab that would lead to a ninth-place finish. Jockey Craig Perret said the star sprinter "grabbed his right quarter" when breaking from the gate. "He tore his whole hoof off," said a distraught Perret.
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