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NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2003
How many brunettes does it take to start a fashion trend? Two, apparently -- if they used to be famous blondes. Pop tarts Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera shocked fashion observers recently. Brazenly, they cast aside their signature peroxide locks in favor of sleek, dark manes and ushered in a new era for hair color. Brown, clearly, is the new blond. And the new brunette is definitely out to have more fun. "I do think we are in a brunette moment right now," said style observer Robert Verdi, host of Full Frontal Fashion on the Women's Entertainment network.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 7, 2009
Darren Hitt's work really is rocket science. But forget about blinding flames and thundering engines generating millions of pounds of thrust. The Baltimore native is working on propulsion systems built on silicon chips that would generate thrust in tiny puffs of steam. They're the kind of thrusters NASA will need to maneuver a new fleet of 10- or 20-pound "nanosatellites" - spacecraft no bigger than beach balls. His research team at the University of Vermont's School of Engineering in Burlington just received a $750,000 grant to advance development of the technology.
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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | November 11, 1992
State investigators were trying to determine last night who delivered 27 containers of industrial chemicals to their owner -- by depositing them on the lawn of his Randallstown home.The containers, ranging from 55-gallon drums of hydrogen peroxide to small barrels of solvents, acids and germicides, were left off sometime before 5:50 p.m. on the lawn in the 4000 block of McDonogh Road and prompted an evacuation of 14 homes in the neighborhood.The homeowner, identified as Donald Kahn, told investigators that he recently left the textile business and had been storing the chemicals at a warehouse, said Lt. Richard Brooks, a Baltimore County fire department spokesman.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN REPORTER | December 12, 2007
The end of the year is approaching and that means one thing for the upscale eyewear shop Paris West Optical on Charles Street: sales. It's not the typical rush to buy holiday gifts, but it is a rush to spend. Customers need to empty their flexible spending accounts, the pre-tax pot of money they set aside through their employers to pay for health care needs not covered by their insurance. The money can be used for such things as dental visits, over-the-counter drugs - and glasses, which are pitched by retailers as a seasonal present to oneself rather than an account-draining binge on less appealing medicine cabinet should-haves.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | August 25, 2006
I am highly susceptible to mosquito bites and often get a dozen bites in the same time frame that others get one. I have tried many remedies to prevent the bites, such as natural insect repellants and vitamin B. I am still "fresh bait." Years ago, someone told me to rub hydrogen peroxide as soon as possible on the bites. Doing this alleviates the pain from the stings and itching within minutes. We heard from another reader that Listerine can keep mosquitoes away: "I have been using Listerine as an insect repellant and wonder if other readers have tried it. ... I just wipe it on with a gauze pad, and it works for me!"
FEATURES
August 13, 1991
Your basic first-aid kit should contain:* Analgesics such as aspirin, ibuprofen or acetaminophen to relieve headaches, muscle aches and joint pain.* Antacids and anti-diarrhea medicines.* Anti-fungal lotions or powders to relieve heat rash, athlete's foot, jock itch and other fungal infections.* Antihistamines to relieve sneezing, running nose, watery eyes and itching.* Adhesive bandages, tape and small scissors for cuts and scrapes.* Calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream to relieve itching.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 7, 2009
Darren Hitt's work really is rocket science. But forget about blinding flames and thundering engines generating millions of pounds of thrust. The Baltimore native is working on propulsion systems built on silicon chips that would generate thrust in tiny puffs of steam. They're the kind of thrusters NASA will need to maneuver a new fleet of 10- or 20-pound "nanosatellites" - spacecraft no bigger than beach balls. His research team at the University of Vermont's School of Engineering in Burlington just received a $750,000 grant to advance development of the technology.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN REPORTER | December 12, 2007
The end of the year is approaching and that means one thing for the upscale eyewear shop Paris West Optical on Charles Street: sales. It's not the typical rush to buy holiday gifts, but it is a rush to spend. Customers need to empty their flexible spending accounts, the pre-tax pot of money they set aside through their employers to pay for health care needs not covered by their insurance. The money can be used for such things as dental visits, over-the-counter drugs - and glasses, which are pitched by retailers as a seasonal present to oneself rather than an account-draining binge on less appealing medicine cabinet should-haves.
NEWS
By William Safire | September 28, 1994
London -- YEARS AGO, I brushed my teeth with Kolynos toothpaste. Then Harry Von Zell or somebody got me to switch brands to Ipana, for the "smile of beauty." I felt vaguely guilty about deserting Kolynos, especially after Ipana squeezed its last.More recently, I was swept up in the wave of private brands. No more Bayer, the aspirin that cooled my childhood fevers; I was persuaded by consumerists that the same product sold for less under the name of my drug store, People's; that outfit has since been sold to some chain with forgettable initials and now my medicine chest is filled with strangers to which I feel no attachment and from which I get no sense of familiarity or security.
FEATURES
September 13, 2007
With the rise in cases of diabetes, more and more people will suffer from foot ulcers that do not heal and may end up needing amputation because treatment of chronic wounds is so difficult. Today, an alternative treatment based on a remedy used since antiquity is getting increased attention -- smearing wounds with honey. Manuka Honey, a medicinal honey harvested by beekeepers in New Zealand, is now being marketed for application on wounds. In June, Health Canada approved it under the brand name Medihoney for use as a wound dressing and antimicrobial.
FEATURES
September 13, 2007
With the rise in cases of diabetes, more and more people will suffer from foot ulcers that do not heal and may end up needing amputation because treatment of chronic wounds is so difficult. Today, an alternative treatment based on a remedy used since antiquity is getting increased attention -- smearing wounds with honey. Manuka Honey, a medicinal honey harvested by beekeepers in New Zealand, is now being marketed for application on wounds. In June, Health Canada approved it under the brand name Medihoney for use as a wound dressing and antimicrobial.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | December 1, 2006
If grapefruit increases the action of Lipitor, is it OK to drink grapefruit juice and reduce the dosage of Lipitor to save money? This is an intriguing strategy. Researchers have occasionally used grapefruit to boost the power of some expensive medications. Cyclosporine (Sandimmune), used to prevent organ transplant rejection, can cost thousands of dollars per year. Although grapefruit juice may enable transplant patients to lower the dose and save money, researchers find that there is too much variability among patients and in batches of juice for this to be safe.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2003
How many brunettes does it take to start a fashion trend? Two, apparently -- if they used to be famous blondes. Pop tarts Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera shocked fashion observers recently. Brazenly, they cast aside their signature peroxide locks in favor of sleek, dark manes and ushered in a new era for hair color. Brown, clearly, is the new blond. And the new brunette is definitely out to have more fun. "I do think we are in a brunette moment right now," said style observer Robert Verdi, host of Full Frontal Fashion on the Women's Entertainment network.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
Six teams have new coaches as Anne Arundel county teams face off for the 1999 season in boys lacrosse.Two of those coaches will draw on the expertise of their fathers, and another's emphasis on the team concept prompted his players to engage in a mass shampooing with peroxide.John German at Annapolis and Jim Beardmore at Chesapeake will be looking to carry on winning traditions, and Jamie McNealey hopes to return his alma mater, Severn School, to prominence.Severn, ranked No. 8 in the metro area at 5-9 last spring because of its tough Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference schedule, has not had a winning season in six years.
NEWS
By William Safire | September 28, 1994
London -- YEARS AGO, I brushed my teeth with Kolynos toothpaste. Then Harry Von Zell or somebody got me to switch brands to Ipana, for the "smile of beauty." I felt vaguely guilty about deserting Kolynos, especially after Ipana squeezed its last.More recently, I was swept up in the wave of private brands. No more Bayer, the aspirin that cooled my childhood fevers; I was persuaded by consumerists that the same product sold for less under the name of my drug store, People's; that outfit has since been sold to some chain with forgettable initials and now my medicine chest is filled with strangers to which I feel no attachment and from which I get no sense of familiarity or security.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | November 11, 1992
State investigators were trying to determine last night who delivered 27 containers of industrial chemicals to their owner -- by depositing them on the lawn of his Randallstown home.The containers, ranging from 55-gallon drums of hydrogen peroxide to small barrels of solvents, acids and germicides, were left off sometime before 5:50 p.m. on the lawn in the 4000 block of McDonogh Road and prompted an evacuation of 14 homes in the neighborhood.The homeowner, identified as Donald Kahn, told investigators that he recently left the textile business and had been storing the chemicals at a warehouse, said Lt. Richard Brooks, a Baltimore County fire department spokesman.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
Six teams have new coaches as Anne Arundel county teams face off for the 1999 season in boys lacrosse.Two of those coaches will draw on the expertise of their fathers, and another's emphasis on the team concept prompted his players to engage in a mass shampooing with peroxide.John German at Annapolis and Jim Beardmore at Chesapeake will be looking to carry on winning traditions, and Jamie McNealey hopes to return his alma mater, Severn School, to prominence.Severn, ranked No. 8 in the metro area at 5-9 last spring because of its tough Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference schedule, has not had a winning season in six years.
FEATURES
August 13, 1991
Your basic first-aid kit should contain:* Analgesics such as aspirin, ibuprofen or acetaminophen to relieve headaches, muscle aches and joint pain.* Antacids and anti-diarrhea medicines.* Anti-fungal lotions or powders to relieve heat rash, athlete's foot, jock itch and other fungal infections.* Antihistamines to relieve sneezing, running nose, watery eyes and itching.* Adhesive bandages, tape and small scissors for cuts and scrapes.* Calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream to relieve itching.
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