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NEWS
March 30, 1992
1-800-685-777. Now there are two 800 numbers in the presidential campaign. We print H. Ross Perot's because, unlike Jerry Brown's, readers can get some information without being solicited for funds. Mr. Perot is the Texas billionaire businessman, philanthropist and corporate soldier of fortune whose efforts to free captured Americans in Vietnam and Iran made him a household word. He says he will finance his own third-party presidential campaign if a grass roots effort gets his name on all 50 state ballots.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 4, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Ross Perot switched his legal strategy yesterday from trying to get himself included in Sunday's campaign debate between President Clinton and Bob Dole to trying to stop the debate altogether.Seeking a federal appeals court ruling that would wipe out the private commission sponsoring the presidential and vice-presidential debates, Perot's advisers said they believe such a court ruling would be enough to scuttle the first Clinton-Dole face-off Sunday night.The Commission on Presidential Debates, deciding that Perot has no real chance to be elected, had voted to exclude him from the debates.
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NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | October 11, 1992
DALLAS -- "Good Morning America" viewers will wake up to Ross Perot's campaign commercials from tomorrow until election eve.The Dallas billionaire bought $3.4 million worth of advertising time on ABC on Friday, including a pair of one-minute ads daily on "GMA" at a cost of $1.5 million, said network spokesman Steve Battaglio.Last week, Mr. Perot spent $1 million to twice broadcast a half-hour program in which he lectured about the nation's troubled economy.The Perot campaign's latest buy -- which pushes his spending on ABC, NBC and CBS to about $6.5 million -- also includes commercials throughout ABC's prime-time schedule this week.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1994
He's a businessman -- not a lawyer -- who refuses to take money from special interest groups. He says he wants to go to Washington, make the tough choices and get out.Sound a little like Ross Perot?Bill Frank hopes so. The 34-year-old banker from Towson is running for Congress as the political outsider who will go to Washington to straighten things out, and then leave office, as Mr. Perot promised to do in the 1992 presidential campaign.And in the 2nd Congressional District, Mr. Frank believes his conservative outsider status will help him win the Republican primary Sept.
NEWS
October 2, 1992
Joan Vinson, Maryland coordinator of the Perot campaign, announced yesterday she was stepping down because of an illness in her family.Bert Keith, a volunteer, said he would be running the campaign's Maryland office in Mrs. Vinson's absence. He said it was unclear if she would be able to return to the campaign.
NEWS
By Steven A. Holmes and Steven A. Holmes,New York Times News Service | October 1, 1992
DALLAS -- Ross Perot, whose original candidacy for the presidency was dogged by allegations that he hired private detectives to investigate business competitors, hired a California private investigator to conduct investigations of some of the volunteers in his campaign.An official with the Perot campaign acknowledged yesterday that the Dallas billionaire paid more than $76,000 in August and September to the Callahan & Gibbons Group, a San Francisco company that does private investigations.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | October 6, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Ross Perot spent $155,000 in Maryland be- tween last spring and the end of August, according to federal records. A quarter of that helped finance his Cecil B. DeMille-like arrival in Annapolis in June to celebrate the petition drive that put him on the Maryland ballot.The Texas billionaire, who last week re-entered the presidential race, also spent thousands of dollars for office supplies, phone bills and staff salaries in Maryland after abruptly ending his campaign in July, according to records filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC)
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
Can H. Ross Perot pull your credit report?Maryland Consumer Credit Commissioner Alan T. Fell is posing that very question in the wake of complaints by two former Perot volunteers that they were fired after an unauthorized check of their credit."
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff Writer | July 16, 1992
To many Severna Park old-timers hanging out at the local drugstore, Ross Perot is no knight in shining armor.In this largely Republican enclave, he's seen as something even better -- a good businessman.From senior citizens to small-business owners, Severna Park residents are flocking to the nearest Perot headquarters, located in a donated home along Ritchie Highway.The "Perot in '92" sign looks slightly out of place on the lawn of the same house that served as headquarters for Republican Robert R. Neall in 1990.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
Political pundits huff over Ross Perot's refusal to play the usual campaign game -- "He won't talk about the issues!" "He's using his own money to buy the presidency!" -- and seem baffled over just who could support such an idiosyncratic, even mysterious, candidate.Here's the answer: They are the unemployed and the employed. They are Democrats, Republicans and independents. But mostly, they are people who aren't looking for the same things in a candidate that conventional wisdom has been telling them to look for."
NEWS
By Jack Nelson and Jack Nelson,Los Angeles Times | July 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Ross Perot declared yesterday that President Clinton's $500 billion deficit reduction package would "damage the country" and vowed to wage an aggressive campaign to defeat it.The Texas billionaire declared in a telephone interview that he will launch a television blitz and direct his organization, United We Stand, America, in a concerted campaign to kill the president's plan. A House-Senate conference committee is expected to report the plan to the House and Senate by the end of this week, with final action scheduled for next week before Congress recesses for the summer on Aug. 6.An active campaign by Mr. Perot could deal a crushing blow to the Clinton plan, which is on shaky ground in Congress, and in turn seriously damage the president.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | June 11, 1993
Ross Perot is headed back to Maryland this weekend. The question is why.Is the flamboyant Texas billionaire already running for president of the United States, albeit a bit early? Or is he, as his critics believe, merely suffering from an insatiable appetite for attention?What is clear is that the volunteers who helped him win 14 percent of the Maryland vote (and 19 percent nationally) in last year's presidential election believe his visit will boost membership in the Maryland chapter of his national organization, United We Stand, America.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 17, 1993
DALLAS -- Ross Perot plans a major effort to influenc legislation on Capitol Hill during the early years of the Clinton administration, starting with the May 1 special election in Texas to replace Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, President-elect Bill Clinton's choice as treasury secretary.Mr. Perot said in an interview that in the first 24 hours after he announced his intention to resume political activity Jan. 11, 500,000 people called his phone banks, and 400,000 joined United We Stand, America, the organization that grew out of his independent presidential campaign in 1992.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | October 30, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Some of the sharpest words against presidential candidate Ross Perot came yesterday from a group of his former volunteers who assembled here to warn voters about the "secret investigations" the Perot campaign conducted into their backgrounds.Seven former volunteers, including two from Frederick, claimed that their credit histories had been illegally checked by the Dallas operation, and many told stories of being "viciously" treated while working on the Perot petition drive last spring and summer.
NEWS
By William Safire | October 27, 1992
DO you realize that it's as if George Bush's staff had been infiltrated by "Russian spies"?That's the paranoid message being pumped out endlessly on radio commercials paid for by Ross Perot. While media analysts are entranced by his self-glorifying television infotainment, few observers of mass manipulation focus on the underside of the Perot campaign -- radio spots, where the passions of outrage groupies are stirred by fears of unseen enemies.The paradox is that this knee to Mr. Bush's groin helps the Bush campaign.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 24, 1992
DALLAS -- With signs that the presidential race is tightening, at least partly because of his influence, Ross Perot announced yesterday that he was intensifying his efforts with new purchases of television time and his first conventional campaign foray.Mr. Perot's only public appearances during his 23-day presidential campaign have been at the three debates. But he said yesterday that he would attend rallies tomorrow in Flemington, N.J., and Pittsburgh.Meanwhile, the Bush and Clinton campaigns backed away from their public predictions that Mr. Perot could not win, which only seemed to hand ammunition to Mr. Perot in his campaign against the political establishment.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Staff Writer Staff Writer Jack Germond contributed to this article | July 16, 1992
NEW YORK -- Fueling reports that the independent presidential candidacy of Ross Perot is beginning to wither, co-manager Edward J. Rollins resigned from the campaign yesterday, citing differences with the feisty Texas billionaire on "overall strategy and tactics."The resignation comes only 45 days after the veteran Republican strategist, who managed Ronald Reagan's sweeping re-election campaign in 1984, broke ranks with his party and joined the fledgling Perot campaign with Democratic strategist Hamilton Jordan.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | July 31, 1992
DALLAS -- Supporters of Ross Perot officially have formed a national political organization, pledging to pressure presidential and congressional candidates to adopt Mr. Perot's economic and political programs.The volunteers dubbed their organization "United We Stand," borrowing the name Mr. Perot gave to an organization he created in 1969 to support President Richard Nixon's Vietnam policies.After two days of meetings in a North Dallas hotel, volunteers said yesterday they reluctantly accepted Mr. Perot's July 16 decision not to run for president.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
Can H. Ross Perot pull your credit report?Maryland Consumer Credit Commissioner Alan T. Fell is posing that very question in the wake of complaints by two former Perot volunteers that they were fired after an unauthorized check of their credit."
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | October 11, 1992
DALLAS -- "Good Morning America" viewers will wake up to Ross Perot's campaign commercials from tomorrow until election eve.The Dallas billionaire bought $3.4 million worth of advertising time on ABC on Friday, including a pair of one-minute ads daily on "GMA" at a cost of $1.5 million, said network spokesman Steve Battaglio.Last week, Mr. Perot spent $1 million to twice broadcast a half-hour program in which he lectured about the nation's troubled economy.The Perot campaign's latest buy -- which pushes his spending on ABC, NBC and CBS to about $6.5 million -- also includes commercials throughout ABC's prime-time schedule this week.
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