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NEWS
June 12, 1993
Texas billionaire Ross Perot will be in Catonsville this morning for a rally sponsored by his political organization, United We Stand, America. The rally is at 10 a.m. in the field house at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.
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NEWS
July 26, 2009
On July 25, 2009, WILBUR QUINTER "Bill" age 92; beloved husband of the late Jean Quinter; devoted father of Nancy E. Gibault, Jeanne Wilbourne and Charles Quinter; dearest brother of Ivan Quinter, Jr., and the late Sarah Perot and the late Mary Gaston. Also survived by several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Services and interment are private. Arrangements by Bradley Ashton Funeral Home, P.A.
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NEWS
May 1, 1992
Of 565 callers to SUNDIAL, 343, or 60 percent, think Ross Perot's presidential candidacy would have the most impact on the Democrats, and 222 (39 percent) think it will have most impact on the Republicans.Mr. Perot can be elected as an independent, according to 448 of 568 callers (78 percent), while 120 (21 percent) say he can't.Between Mr. Perot and Bill Clinton, in the opinion of 558 callers, Mr. Perot would be the stronger Democrat (481 votes, 86 percent), and Mr. Clinton would be the stronger (77 votes, 13 percent)
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,rona.marech@baltsun.com | November 6, 2008
Vice Adm. James B. Stockdale, a pilot who died in 2005 at age 81, is perhaps best known for his heroic turn as a prisoner of war in Vietnam. Shot down while on a mission Sept. 9, 1965, he landed in a small coastal village, where he was beaten by a mob. He spent the next 7 1/2 years in the Hoa Lo Prison, where he was kept in solitary confinement for four years, tortured and denied medical care. Yet Stockdale, who was the highest-ranking naval officer at the prison, managed to organize a system of communication and help buoy the spirits of his fellow prisoners.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 21, 1992
DALLAS -- Texas billionaire Ross Perot reports that he has spent more than $400,000 to land his name on the ballot.Indeed, most of the money behind the Perot Petition Committee comes from Mr. Perot himself, according to filings with the Federal Election Commission.The FEC requires any potential candidate who has spent more than $5,000 to disclose the sources and uses of contributions."It is not a campaign," Thomas H. Luce, Mr. Perot's lawyer and adviser, said yesterday. "The only organization that exists is the one that is helping volunteers in the field."
NEWS
September 15, 1996
ROSS PEROT'S failure to find a mainstream politician willing to be his vice presidential running mate on the Reform Party ticket shows the difficulty of bucking the two-party system. In turning to economist Pat Choate, who shares Mr. Perot's opposition to free trade and his desire to reform Social Security and other budget-busting entitlement programs, he keeps his intellectual position alive.This may not get the Texas billionaire to the double digits he enjoyed in 1992. But if he wins what is rightly his -- a place for himself and Mr. Choate in presidential and vice-presidential debates -- he can confront issues Bill Clinton and Bob Dole would rather avoid.
NEWS
November 11, 1993
Vice President Al Gore took on Ross Perot in his favorite forum -- the Larry King Show -- and soundly thrashed him in their NAFTA debate Tuesday night. Despite the barbs and the bitterness of the encounter, despite Mr. Gore's uncharacteristic aggressiveness and thorough preparation, what really defeated Mr. Perot was the inescapable logic of breaking down trade barriers and opening up markets with a resurgent Mexico."This is a good deal for America," Mr. Gore argued. With the elimination of high Mexican tariffs, U.S. corporations will have less incentive to move their plants south of the Rio Grande.
NEWS
October 27, 1992
Ross Perot's post-debate surge in the polls puts a final bizarre twist on a presidential campaign that has torn up the rule book. At this stage, the Texas billionaire should be settling down into single digits like most independent candidates of yesteryear. Instead, he is taking votes from an increasingly nervous Bill Clinton while blasting away at George Bush, who nevertheless seems to be the chief beneficiary of the Perot comeback.Mr. Perot's charge that a Republican "dirty tricks" operation to smear his daughter caused his temporary withdrawal from the race last summer has yet to register in the ratings.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Ross Perot, the undeclared candidate for president, will be here tomorrow for the ceremonial presentation of more than 140,000 signatures obtained from Marylanders who want him on the ballot this November.In fact, the Perot petitions were delivered to county election boards around the state yesterday. Each signature must be verified as belonging to a registered voter -- and the voter rolls are kept by local boards.Nevertheless, the candidate and a flotilla of 24 boats will cruise into the Annapolis City Dock about noon carrying facsimiles of the petitions.
NEWS
April 4, 1993
Could the headline above be the lineup for the 1996 race? After what Ross Perot had to say last year about dirt-dredgers in the Republican Party, it would take quite a gulp for the GOP to swallow the Texas billionaire as its candidate for president next time out. But consider. If the GOP presidential primaries were starting right now, Mr. Perot would likely blow any other Republican prospect out of the water -- if he chose to run.Consider, too, some of Mr. Perot's recent maneuvers. He has deliberately provoked President Clinton by lambasting just about everything coming out of the White House.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | June 21, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The conditions for an independent presidential run might be better in 2008 than at any time since Ross Perot made his first White House try, according to analysts and recent opinion surveys. Those conditions, and his own deep pockets, might entice New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg to enter the '08 contest. But Bloomberg indicated yesterday that he was still a long way from becoming a candidate, and there are serious questions about whether he would meet with much success if he did. "I think the climate is as favorable as it gets, particularly for somebody like Bloomberg who can project an image of competence.
NEWS
By Marcia Gelbart and Marcia Gelbart,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 19, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - A late 13th-century copy of the Magna Carta, the foundation for the U.S. Constitution, will pay its second visit to Philadelphia in almost 15 years. Housed now in the National Archives in Washington, the document will be displayed at the new Independence Visitor Center, formerly known as the Gateway Visitor Center, at Sixth Street between Market and Arch. Now under construction, the $30 million building is expected to open in late fall and display the Magna Carta until March 2003.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | August 14, 2000
LONG BEACH, Calif. -- If Ross Perot were dead, he'd roll over in his grave to see what's happened to the Reform Party he founded. He's not, but he doesn't seem to care. Four years ago in this same coastal city, Mr. Perot ran a tightly controlled self-coronation with only minor opposition from former Colorado Gov. Dick Lamm. In the election that followed, Mr. Perot's vote fell from the 19 percent he had won in his first presidential run in 1992 as an independent to only 8 percent. But it was enough to entitle this year's Reform Party nominee to $12.6 million under federal campaign law. With that kind of money, there seemed to be a fair chance at the start of 2000 that the new party could gain a real toehold in presidential politics if Mr. Perot finally stepped aside and a good new candidate could be recruited.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | March 31, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Pity the poor Reform Party. Just when voters have been stirred to a lather by John McCain to clean up presidential politics, and Al Gore and George W. Bush are trying to assume his reformer mantle, the third party hand-crafted by Ross Perot seems to be going to hell in a handbasket. The highest-ranking elected official to win under the Reform Party banner, Gov. Jesse Ventura of Minnesota, has abandoned ship in disgust over the party's internal squabbling and its growing image as a haven for political kooks.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 13, 2000
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Ross Perot's allies moved yesterday to reclaim control of the Reform Party in a rowdy and hostile showdown that at one point required police intervention. Before the day's end, the party's national committee had removed Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura's hand-picked party chairman and was on the verge of rejecting Ventura's efforts to hold the party's summer convention in St. Paul, Minn. Ventura, the party's highest-ranking elected official, anticipated yesterday's votes and quit the party Friday, declaring it to be a "dysfunctional family."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 6, 1999
WASHINGTON -- At a time when voters continue to express dissatisfaction with the two major political parties and suggest they'd like an alternative, the turmoil in the most conspicuous option -- the Reform Party -- is imperiling the movement to put a serious face on the third party concept.As a result of Mr. Perot's organizational efforts and 19-percent vote total in the 1992 election, and the formal establishment of the party and his vote of 8.5 percent as its standard-bearer in 1996, the Reform Party is positioned, technically, on the brink of respectability.
NEWS
June 24, 1992
Ross Perot returns today to the old Annapolis haunts he knew as a Naval Academy midshipman, Class of '53, for the ceremonial presentation of petitions putting him on the Maryland ballot as a candidate for president. At the City Dock, the billionaire Texan is to arrive in a flotilla of 24 boats, one for each of the 23 counties and Baltimore City, for one of his well-crafted pep rallies.Marylanders probably won't know any more about what Mr. Perot would do as president after hearing his twangy tub-thumpers than before.
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 19, 1999
WASHINGTON -- If Pat Buchanan, the human hand grenade, lobs himself into the 2000 presidential campaign as nominee of the Reform Party, some Republicans, and perhaps some Democrats, will try to dampen his explosive force by excluding him from next year's presidential debates, as Ross Perot was excluded from the Clinton-Dole debates in 1996. Exclusion would be in the spirit of campaign-finance reformers' plans to further constrict, through government regulation, political discourse.Fortunately, Jamin Raskin, an American University law professor, in his essay "The Debate Gerrymander" in the Texas Law Review, refutes the arguments for excluding candidates like Mr. Buchanan from the central events of presidential contests.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | July 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Too bad a gravel-voiced ring announcer wasn't around to introduce Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura and billionaire Ross Perot when they grappled for the Reform Party championship belt this past weekend.Any doubt about how the title match between the Body and the Mouth came out? Nope. The Body devastated the Mouth.Sure, Mr. Ventura -- the enormously popular former wrestler -- tried to be gracious to Mr. Perot. "A job well done. We owe him a great debt," Mr. Ventura told Reform delegates in Dearborn, Mich.
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