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BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | March 10, 1991
In January, residential building permits in metropolitan Baltimore fell to their lowest level since the recession year of 1982, according to a report by the Baltimore Regional Council of Governments.Building permits for single-family homes fell 34 percent, the council reported.The number of permits for apartment and condominium construction fell even more -- by 98 percent. But the council said that dip was a statistical blip because an exceptionally high number of those permits were issued in January 1990.
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NEWS
September 16, 2011
When 22-year-old Jared Lee Loughner brought a loaded Glock 19 with a 33-round ammunition magazine to a Tucson grocery store parking lot in January, he broke the law only when he opened fire on Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and others at her constituent event. Under Arizona law, no permit is required to carry a concealed handgun outside the home. As the incident demonstrated, such a lax approach would seem to invite mayhem in the streets. But Arizona has the right to set such a problematic standard, despite such evidence as the recent study by a Stanford economist demonstrating that right-to-carry laws do not decrease the overall level of crime and perhaps even increase it. What Arizonans should not have the right to do is force such laissez-faire gun control standards on Maryland; nor should those who live in Alabama, Tennessee, Florida or any of the other states where concealed-handgun permits are much more easily acquired.
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BUSINESS
December 17, 1995
Permits in area for private homes drop nearly 15%The Baltimore region has experienced a nearly 15 percent decline in private housing permits issued in the first nine months of 1995, compared with the same period in 1994, according to a survey by Lomas Mortgage USA.The decline was greatest in multifamily housing permits, more than 20 percent. In the third quarter, permits issued for all kinds of housing were 25.5 percent fewer than same quarter in 1994.The Lomas survey also estimated that the region lost 4,100 jobs in the year ending in September, a 0.4 percent drop.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | March 30, 2009
Walk along the beach at Sullivan Cove in Severna Park and enjoy the serenity. You might see a heron swoop through rare Atlantic white cedar to an adjacent tidal pond. Some community residents, worried that all that could be destroyed, waged a long and expensive fight to stop three homeowners from getting permits to build piers there. The opponents did not succeed, but the debate has prompted state environmental officials to launch a review of rules covering residential pier construction, particularly in environmentally sensitive tidal wetlands.
BUSINESS
By Audrey Haar and Audrey Haar,SOURCE RUFUS S. LUSK & SON INCSOURCE RUFUS S. LUSK & SON INC | May 19, 1991
Home sales in Howard County are finally beginning to rise says Robert Molloy, vice president and sales manager of the Howard County office of Prudential Preferred Properties.Average house prices in Howard County are currently at $124,000, and higher-priced houses are coming back into the market, he noted Thursday.The Howard County office of Prudential recently listed a multimillion-dollar home. "We haven't done that for a long time," Mr. Molloy said.During the real estate slowdown, sellers have been more aggressively marketing their homes, he said.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
Although a late spring buying season stimulated the rea estate market, the number of building permits issued for Harford County homes continued to drop.County officials issued 124 permits last month for the construction of single homes, townhouses, condominiums, apartments and mobile homes. That is 116 fewer than in May 1992.The total of 608 for the year to date represents a drop of 30 percent from the 1992 figure of 863 and a 40 percent dip from the 997 permits issued as of May 1991.There is no significant change in the number of commercial and industrial building permits issued.
BUSINESS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2001
The number of new-building permits in the Baltimore region dropped 12 percent last year to the lowest level in three years, according to a survey by the Baltimore Metropolitan Council. The city and five-county region accounted for 11,117 new units, with Anne Arundel County leading the way. Council officials said they are not alarmed by the 12 percent decline because it was countered by an 8 percent regional rise in permits issued for residential additions, alterations and repairs. "Building permits are always an indicator of the economy," said Tianjin Luo of the council's Metro Research Division.
NEWS
By Carol Bowers and Carol Bowers,Staff writer | January 19, 1992
Doctors, lawyers, dentists and other service-related businesses fueled a slight increase last year in industrial and office construction in the county, even as housing construction slumped.County planning and zoning records show the number of construction permits issued for office, retail and industrial buildings rose to 113 in 1991, from109 in 1990.Three of the permits issued in 1991 were for shopping centers.At the same time, the number of housing permits issued dropped 18 1/2 percent, to 2,232 in 1991 from 2,740 in 1990.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | January 29, 1995
Carroll County Commissioners are working to fulfill a campaign promise: They have begun crafting a proposed law to help ensure that public facilities are adequate for the growing population.Residents have said in public forums and at the polls that they want county officials to do a better job of managing growth. They said they are tired of crowded schools, jammed roads and overworked police officers.The county adequate facilities policy, which provides only guidelines, needs "teeth," Commissioner Donald I. Dell said Friday.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | November 4, 1990
The number of single-family residential building permits issued in metropolitan Baltimore fell 65 percent in September, compared to September 1989, according to the Baltimore Regional Council of Governments.The permit data confirms what sagging sales of new homes had suggested: that after a period of holding almost steady while the national homebuilding industry sagged into recession, the Baltimore new-home market is joining the rest of the nation in a cyclical decline.Only 583 single-family permits were approved during September DTC in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford and Howard counties and Baltimore City in September -- much less than the 810 approved in Howard alone in September 1989.
NEWS
By Steven Stanek and Steven Stanek,Sun Reporter | June 25, 2008
A panel investigating erroneously issued building permits is expected to release its findings to Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold today, including a recommendation that applicants bear more responsibility for ensuring their project proposals are clear. The Task Force for the Study of Erroneous Permit Approvals also asks Leopold to require applicants with revisions to submit original and changed drawings of their project, go through a second review by zoning officials and get a signature from the contractor.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 15, 2005
On the surface, the latest fight over Turf Valley involves a wetlands permit covering less than an acre. But emotions have reached such a fervor that critics are seizing on any issue to delay or deny plans to expand the upscale planned community in western Howard County. The extended debate is often contentious and seems unlikely to change. Neighbors and opponents have brought up a smorgasbord of issues, some of them under the control of the owner and developer of Turf Valley, Mangione Family Enterprises, many of them not. Those issues include school crowding; the number of homes planned; the quality of well water beyond Turf Valley; traffic congestion; architectural design; and the perceived distant relationship between the Maryland Department of the Environment and county planning officials.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2005
Howard County school officials and the Maryland Department of the Environment are working to make sure two construction projects - an addition at Glenelg High School and a new western elementary school - are completed by August 2006. For months, school officials had expressed concerns that the two projects could be delayed because of difficulties in obtaining permits for septic systems. The school system needs MDE's approval for groundwater discharge permits by next month to meet the August 2006 deadline on both projects.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2004
As the walls rose for their new super-sized garage last spring, the lives of Kenneth and JoJo Montgomery fell into a tailspin. Shocked at the size of the 40-by-46-foot, two-story garage, their next-door neighbors, David and Caroline Denzler, filed a complaint with the county. The two-decade friendship between the Highland neighbors disintegrated, and both sides blame Howard County for making things worse. "I love these people. It's very unfortunate that it's come to this," said JoJo Montgomery, who testified at a County Council hearing that she has had doors slammed in her face and her 21-year-old son Joshua called names by neighbors who once were like family.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2002
The lowest mortgage interest rates since the 1960s again spurred housing construction during August in the metropolitan areas of Washington, Baltimore and Hagerstown. Housing permits in those areas increased 19 percent over August 2001, said Robert J. Sheehan, president of Regis J. Sheehan & Associates, a management and market research firm based in McLean, Va. Permits were issued in the Baltimore-Washington-Hagerstown region for 4,377 units in August vs. 3,691 units a year ago. Multifamily permits increased 52 percent to 636 units from 419 units a year earlier.
BUSINESS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2001
The number of new-building permits in the Baltimore region dropped 12 percent last year to the lowest level in three years, according to a survey by the Baltimore Metropolitan Council. The city and five-county region accounted for 11,117 new units, with Anne Arundel County leading the way. Council officials said they are not alarmed by the 12 percent decline because it was countered by an 8 percent regional rise in permits issued for residential additions, alterations and repairs. "Building permits are always an indicator of the economy," said Tianjin Luo of the council's Metro Research Division.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | August 3, 1991
The number of residential construction permits issued in the Baltimore area during the first half of the year dropped 32 percent from the same period a year before and was the lowest number since the recession of 1982, according to the Baltimore Regional Council of Governments.The council released figures this week showing that 5,428 units were authorized for construction from January to June, compared to the figure of 8,046 during the first half of last year. In 1980 through 1982, by contrast, units permitted during each six-month period averaged 3,317, according to council figures.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | August 31, 1993
Carroll would lose almost $166,000 a year in revenue if the commissioners waive building permit and other fees for new and existing businesses.But Commissioner Donald I. Dell said the county would make up the money in taxes the businesses would pay."Hopefully, it will kind of wash," he said yesterday.The commissioners are considering waiving the fees or capping them as a way of attracting businesses and encouraging existing businesses to expand, thus creating jobs in the county."It's a little bit of a carrot to most businesses," Mr. Dell said.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2000
As Carroll County continues to truck raw sewage from Francis Scott Key High School, hopes for a functional wastewater treatment plant at the school received a boost yesterday. Maryland Department of the Environment officials have issued a draft of the permit the county would need to move the long-delayed and mishandled project forward. The county must review the draft, which establishes preliminary guidelines for releasing treated sewage into wetlands, and send it back to MDE. Then the community will have opportunities to comment before MDE makes a final decision.
NEWS
By HAROLD JACKSON | May 17, 1998
SOMETIMES things aren't what they appear to be. Seeing all the houses being built in Howard County, one would assume that growth is exceeding all expectations.That conventional wisdom, however, was knocked for a loop by recent data indicating some home-building rates have not met predictions.My first thoughts were that if fewer houses are being built, then population growth must not be as great either. Which would mean all the talk about new families overburdening a crowded school system was just that -- talk.
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