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By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | July 27, 1993
The Carroll County Board of Housing Review says the county Bureau of Permits and Inspections acted correctly when it decided not to force a Hampstead landlord to clean up lead paint in a Hampstead home.The board found Friday that the law gives the bureau some discretion in enforcing the county's rental unit livability code."The county did what the law said," Paul Zimmerman, board chairman, said yesterday."We [the board] weren't in a position to change the law," he said. "That has to come from the [county]
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2011
Baltimore County officials expect tax credit incentives to spur redevelopment and job creation at the newly designated Federal Center in Woodlawn. The 395-acre, industrially zoned parcel near the Beltway and Dogwood Road has won state approval as an enterprise zone, making its development eligible for substantial savings on state and county property taxes. A qualifying company that makes a $5 million investment could realize a tax savings of nearly $375,000 over 10 years, according to a county release.
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NEWS
June 6, 1999
The Carroll County commissioners recently held their annual employee recognition program to honor workers for length of service and significant contributions.Seven employees received recognition awards from the Ombudsman Committee for service to the citizens of Carroll County. They were: Angie Bowersox and Leonard Haines, the Cost Savings Award; Doug Rawlings, Bright Idea Award; Kim Carter, Debbie Fowler, Gail Jones and Nathalie Schein, Employees of the Year.Michael Valentine of the Office of Public Safety received the Exceptional Service Award for excellence in his work with the fire service.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2004
After nearly seven years, the state fire marshal's office has resumed its role of providing fire safety inspections at new commercial buildings and reinspections of older ones in Carroll County with the hiring of new personnel this spring. Two civilian inspectors, John Wagner and Brian Quick, will be in charge of fire safety inspections at commercial buildings. Wagner will concentrate on new development, and Quick is assigned to work on buildings that were previously inspected by the county.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | January 9, 1995
A City Council member and several members of Westminster's Historic District Commission say they're worried about a proposed ordinance that would make it easier for the city to tear down dilapidated buildings.But sponsors of the proposal say demolition would be a last resort to deal with property owners who have not repaired buildings that are unfit for human habitation.The council is scheduled to vote tonight on the ordinance and on proposed amendments requiring a review by the Historic District Commission and council approval before the city could go to court to force the demolition of a derelict building.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | January 15, 1991
A Crofton rubble landfill, cited for exceeding capacity, will remainopen while the state and county review a plan to permanently close the site.Roger Perkins, administrative hearing officer, postponed yesterday's hearing to allow Cunningham Excavation Inc. to explain why it exceeded the capacity set in its 1981 special zoning exception and state permits.Assistant County Attorney Cheryl Boudreau, saying she had reachedan agreement with owner James Cunningham a week ago, requested an eight-week postponment while Cunningham seeks approval for a plan to permanently close the site.
NEWS
February 22, 1993
Pasadena man injured sledding at collegeA 29-year-old Pasadena man was slightly injured around 6 p.m. yesterday while sledding on the golf course at Western Maryland College.James Taylor refused to go to Carroll County General Hospital for treatment as medics from the Westminster Volunteer Fire Department recommended.Raymond Snead, 26, of Westminster said he and Mr. Taylor had been sledding on inflated white plastic inner tubes on the hill at Route 31 and West Main Street most of the afternoon.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2004
After nearly seven years, the state fire marshal's office has resumed its role of providing fire safety inspections at new commercial buildings and reinspections of older ones in Carroll County with the hiring of new personnel this spring. Two civilian inspectors, John Wagner and Brian Quick, will be in charge of fire safety inspections at commercial buildings. Wagner will concentrate on new development, and Quick is assigned to work on buildings that were previously inspected by the county.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2011
Baltimore County officials expect tax credit incentives to spur redevelopment and job creation at the newly designated Federal Center in Woodlawn. The 395-acre, industrially zoned parcel near the Beltway and Dogwood Road has won state approval as an enterprise zone, making its development eligible for substantial savings on state and county property taxes. A qualifying company that makes a $5 million investment could realize a tax savings of nearly $375,000 over 10 years, according to a county release.
NEWS
December 11, 1992
During the first half of their term, Carroll's thre commissioners -- Julia W. Gouge, Donald I. Dell and Elmer C. Lippy -- have proven to be able housekeepers, but inferior policy makers. With business-like efficiency, they execute the quotidian affairs of county government.But when it comes to considering broad policy and the long-range implications of its actions, the Board of Commissioners repeatedly seems to be adrift.Despite being saddled with the responsibility of shrinking an already Spartan budget, the commissioners, to their credit, have made cuts without eroding the quality of public services.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
The Carroll County commissioners recently held their annual employee recognition program to honor workers for length of service and significant contributions.Seven employees received recognition awards from the Ombudsman Committee for service to the citizens of Carroll County. They were: Angie Bowersox and Leonard Haines, the Cost Savings Award; Doug Rawlings, Bright Idea Award; Kim Carter, Debbie Fowler, Gail Jones and Nathalie Schein, Employees of the Year.Michael Valentine of the Office of Public Safety received the Exceptional Service Award for excellence in his work with the fire service.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1998
The Carroll County Board of Housing Review has recommended soil testing to determine the source of an intermittent foul odor at Locust House, a subsidized housing complex for the elderly and disabled in Westminster.In its decision, the five-member board said the county Bureau of Permits and Inspections "did not properly enforce the Minimum Livability Code when it failed to require random exterior soil samples" from land surrounding the seven-story building, home to nearly 100 tenants.The code, enacted by the county a decade ago, protects renters from unsafe housing conditions.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and Jim Haner and JoAnna Daemmrich and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1996
A veteran city inspector who enforces Baltimore's electrical code has issued building permits to contractors who employ his son, has done work on the side for two contracting firms and has accepted cash for shortcutting the permits and inspections process.Leon A. Peters, an electrical inspector since 1974, has also signed off on building permits peppered with erroneous and misleading information. At least five contractors whose names were used in the documents say they never authorized the permits or did any of the described work.
NEWS
March 8, 1996
Spending money like the Cold War is still onDid you catch the congressional ''spending'' act of January 1996? Maybe you watched the blizzard instead. While congressional leaders were hotly debating federal budget ''cuts'' and ''deficit reduction'' in the media, they were forging ahead with a National Defense Authorization Act that depicts a deep Cold War mentality.The 1996 National Defense Authorization Act includes:$264.7 billion for national defense, $7 billion more than the president (and the Pentagon)
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | July 5, 1995
Residential development review fees nearly quadrupled and building permit fees doubled Monday, a move county officials said will raise almost $1.6 million and help ensure that development pays for the services it uses.Builders said the increases simply raise the price of a home."The only folks who pay these bills are the folks trying to get a home," said Richard L. Hull, president of Carroll Land Services Inc. in Westminster."The politicians are not helping the consumers, they're hurting them," the land development consultant said.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | January 9, 1995
A City Council member and several members of Westminster's Historic District Commission say they're worried about a proposed ordinance that would make it easier for the city to tear down dilapidated buildings.But sponsors of the proposal say demolition would be a last resort to deal with property owners who have not repaired buildings that are unfit for human habitation.The council is scheduled to vote tonight on the ordinance and on proposed amendments requiring a review by the Historic District Commission and council approval before the city could go to court to force the demolition of a derelict building.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | July 5, 1995
Residential development review fees nearly quadrupled and building permit fees doubled Monday, a move county officials said will raise almost $1.6 million and help ensure that development pays for the services it uses.Builders said the increases simply raise the price of a home."The only folks who pay these bills are the folks trying to get a home," said Richard L. Hull, president of Carroll Land Services Inc. in Westminster."The politicians are not helping the consumers, they're hurting them," the land development consultant said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1998
The Carroll County Board of Housing Review has recommended soil testing to determine the source of an intermittent foul odor at Locust House, a subsidized housing complex for the elderly and disabled in Westminster.In its decision, the five-member board said the county Bureau of Permits and Inspections "did not properly enforce the Minimum Livability Code when it failed to require random exterior soil samples" from land surrounding the seven-story building, home to nearly 100 tenants.The code, enacted by the county a decade ago, protects renters from unsafe housing conditions.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | July 27, 1993
The Carroll County Board of Housing Review says the county Bureau of Permits and Inspections acted correctly when it decided not to force a Hampstead landlord to clean up lead paint in a Hampstead home.The board found Friday that the law gives the bureau some discretion in enforcing the county's rental unit livability code."The county did what the law said," Paul Zimmerman, board chairman, said yesterday."We [the board] weren't in a position to change the law," he said. "That has to come from the [county]
NEWS
February 22, 1993
Pasadena man injured sledding at collegeA 29-year-old Pasadena man was slightly injured around 6 p.m. yesterday while sledding on the golf course at Western Maryland College.James Taylor refused to go to Carroll County General Hospital for treatment as medics from the Westminster Volunteer Fire Department recommended.Raymond Snead, 26, of Westminster said he and Mr. Taylor had been sledding on inflated white plastic inner tubes on the hill at Route 31 and West Main Street most of the afternoon.
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