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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Baltimore officials have denied a second request by Occupy Baltimore protesters to obtain permits to use in McKeldin Square, the Inner Harbor park where the group has been entrenched since early October. The city "is committed to protecting individuals' right to protest," Recreation and Parks director Gregory Bayor wrote in a letter to the group dated Monday. "However, permanent camping is prohibited in public parks. " The protesters wrote in an application last week that as many as 300 people hoped to stay in the square through April.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Last weekend, Towson students jammed into a parking lot outside Johnny Unitas Stadium, drinking and partying in a pre-game tailgate bash that university officials said left a police officer injured and a girl needing stitches after she attempted a backflip off a pickup truck. None of that was evident Saturday before the Tigers' football game against the Maine Black Bears, after university administrators cracked down on hard-core partying and set new rules for student tailgating.
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BUSINESS
By Baltimore Sun staff and news services | January 21, 2010
The housing market remains a significant risk to the economy, data released Wednesday showed, as bad weather across much of the country hammered the construction industry. Along with icy storms, the real estate recovery is facing man-made head winds. The government said Wednesday that buyers will face higher fees and tougher standards for home loans backed by the Federal Housing Administration, a popular source of loans for first-time buyers. And unemployment is expected to remain high throughout the year, which is likely to drive the foreclosure rate to new records.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
The project manager who oversaw the development of Baltimore's food truck policy is expected to lead a review of charging fees for items set outside homes and businesses, under a contact the city's spending panel is asked to approve Wednesday. The Board of Estimates will decide whether to approve a $73,300 one-year contract for Babila Lima, who is the mayor's cousin, to work under the director of the Department of General Services. The city's ethics policy doesn't recognize the relationship between an elected official and their cousin in its nepotism rules.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | April 14, 1991
Permits for Maryland's spring rockfish season, which open May 11, will be available at distribution centers this week. There is no charge for the permits, but there will be a limit of one per person, and the permit is required for anyone fishing for rockfish.L A Chesapeake Bay sportfishing license also will be required.During the special hook-and-line rockfish season, which closes May 27, fishermen will be limited to one fish measuring at least 36 inches long.Fishermen will be required to tag the fish through the gill immediately after landing it. The fish then must be checked in at a designated station on the day it is caught.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | February 12, 1992
The mayor of Annapolis is learning a lesson about parking in his hometown.In the city's historic district, where parking spots on thetraffic-clogged streets are at a premium, every residential sticker counts. Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins discovered that after he paid off a bet with five freebie permits.Although the mayor apologized and tried to smooth over the issue last week, frustrated residents won't let the matter drop. Complaining that they often must circle their homes to find a parking spot, several residents have questioned whether the problem is more widespreadand have called for a full investigation.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | April 3, 1992
When the mayor of Morningside came to Annapolis on a business trip, he got a permit that opened the gates to the state capital's crowded streets. Mayor Gerald Glaubitz, who presides over the hamlet of 1,200 people in southern Prince George's County, visited Annapolis' historic City Hall. He shook hands with Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins and leftwith a temporary permit that allowed him to park for free near the State House. It was one of Hopkins' many gestures of small-town hospitality.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | July 18, 1991
The Maryland Department of the Environment has modified its policy to allow printers to take possession of presses before they have the necessary permits to operate them.The decision was made this week after an article in The Evening Sun on Monday pointed out the plight of small printers who were finding it difficult to buy used presses because of the long waiting period for the permits.Under the federal Clean Air Act, the state must limit the quantity of volatile organic compounds -- such as gasoline vapors -- released into the air. The state requires a permit for such items as gasoline storage tanks, dry-cleaning machines, incinerators, chemical-processing equipment used by photographers, and printing presses.
NEWS
By Kim Clark | August 28, 1991
For years, the best Scott Warehime has been able to do when guests at the Tremont Hotel ask him to call them a cab has been to smile and say: "OK, you're a cab."The desk agent says dispatchers often wait dozens of rings before answering his calls, and then cars can take 15 minutes to swing by the downtown hotel."We need more cabs," he said.But Baltimore won't be getting any more for at least another 90 days.State regulators' proposal to issue 69 more permits to raise the number of licensed cabs on city streets to 1,151 has been stayed by a Baltimore City Circuit Court judge.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2000
Thirty-three Baltimore taxicab permits were auctioned off yesterday after the companies that held them defaulted on loan payments. Nine cab companies, all members of the Royal Taxicab Association Inc., had put up their combined 90 permits as collateral for a financing agreement. When they didn't make payments on time, the financier, Medallion Funding Corp. in New York, repossessed the permits. In an auction on Jan. 13, 45 permits were sold. Forty-five more were available yesterday, but 12 were not purchased and will be offered again Feb. 2. Just as the bidding began yesterday at Alex Cooper Auctioneers Inc. in Towson, a lawyer who represented the nine companies stood to protest the proceedings.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Ocean City Police have shut down a number of henna tattoo stands on the boardwalk after the operators were found to be working in violation of their visa permits. A joint police investigation with ICE Homeland Security found 10 individuals with F-1 student visas who were selling goods on the boardwalk without proper documentation. The students were given a warning and a total of eight henna tattoo stands were shut down last weekend, police said.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Construction of new homes is lagging around the country, and Maryland is no exception. Permits for new homes, which the U.S. Census Bureau tracks as a barometer of the home-building industry, fell 8 percent in Maryland in the first six months of this year compared to the same period in 2013. The number of single-family detached homes authorized for construction fell 15 percent. That's worse than the country as a whole, where multifamily structures lifted permitting 5 percent through June.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
A proposal to sharply limit parking in part of Hampden is drawing concern from some who think the new restrictions would merely shift parking woes to other streets in the popular Baltimore neighborhood. A major redevelopment project at the Rotunda shopping mall has prompted some residents to push for a residential parking permit zone nearby. But some business owners along 36th Street worry that restrictions a couple of blocks north would make parking more difficult for everyone, including patrons of their cafes, boutiques and restaurants.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2014
A team of chemists and engineers from Aberdeen Proving Ground has begun to neutralize chemicals from Syria's weapons stocks, the Pentagon said Monday. The work is taking place aboard the container ship MV Cape Ray under heavy security at an undisclosed location in international waters. The ship left Gioia Tauro, Italy, with 600 tons of chemicals, including the World War I blister agent sulfur mustard and the sarin precursor DF. The team of some 64 civilians from the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, who developed a special system for neutralizing the chemicals aboard a ship, had waited months to get started.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
The owner of a planned power plant in Fairfield faces millions of dollars in fines and has been ordered to halt construction because company officials didn't buy enough emissions credits to offset air pollution the facility is expected to emit, according to state officials. Maryland Department of the Environment officials could fine Energy Answers International, the New York-based company that is building the plant, more than $8 million for the violation — $25,000 for each day since it began construction last August.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
The Moonrise Festival is getting a second chance. The two-day music festival is scheduled to take place Aug. 9 and 10 at Pimlico Race Course, according to festival partner Evan Weinstein.  Last June, Pretty Lights and Snoop Dogg were scheduled to headline the first-ever Moonrise Festival at Port Covington . Tickets were sold, the event was promoted but there was one problem: Organizers failed to obtain the necessary permits to put on a...
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
More than four years after Maryland first moved to regulate its largest poultry and livestock farms, nearly 30 percent, or 169 operations, still do not have required state permits mandating measures to control polluted runoff from their chicken houses or feedlots. An environmental watchdog group, the Center for Progressive Reform, contends the state is lagging in protecting the Chesapeake Bay from pollution from such large-scale farms. The Washington-based center said in a new report that the state's regulatory effort is hampered by a lack of staff and skimpy inspections.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | October 1, 1993
State environmental officials issued permits yesterday that will let the Columbia Association build a second golf course, the last major hurdle for a controversial project that has pitted golfers against some of the course's future neighbors.The Maryland Department of Natural Resources granted permits for construction work that would affect wetlands, buffer areas and the flood plain of the Little Patuxent River and its tributaries.The state said the association met all of the requirements to avoid or minimize the effect of the project on wetlands, to demonstrate the need for the project and to evaluate alternative sites.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
A Baltimore County permits inspector was charged after police said they found more than 5,000 images child porn on his home computer and other electronic devices. David Michael Gaine, 58, who has worked for 11 years as an inspector for the county's department of Permits, Approvals and Inspections, was charged with possession and distribution of child pornography. Detectives also found that Gaine participated in chat rooms with others interested in child pornography. Police do not believe Gaine downloaded or viewed child pornography using county equipment or on county time.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | February 20, 2014
Laurel Park Reshuffled Fritchie gains Merry Meadow The field for Saturday's $300,000 Barbara Fritchie Handicap (G2) at Laurel Park is significantly different from the one originally scheduled to race last Saturday. Four of filly and mare sprinters will not be competing this weekend, while another has been added into the mix. Parx Racing-based Winning Image and Villette are not permitted to leave the Philadelphia track because of a quarantine after an equine herpes outbreak.
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