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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Baltimore officials have denied a second request by Occupy Baltimore protesters to obtain permits to use in McKeldin Square, the Inner Harbor park where the group has been entrenched since early October. The city "is committed to protecting individuals' right to protest," Recreation and Parks director Gregory Bayor wrote in a letter to the group dated Monday. "However, permanent camping is prohibited in public parks. " The protesters wrote in an application last week that as many as 300 people hoped to stay in the square through April.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
A Baltimore County permits inspector was charged after police said they found more than 5,000 images child porn on his home computer and other electronic devices. David Michael Gaine, 58, who has worked for 11 years as an inspector for the county's department of Permits, Approvals and Inspections, was charged with possession and distribution of child pornography. Detectives also found that Gaine participated in chat rooms with others interested in child pornography. Police do not believe Gaine downloaded or viewed child pornography using county equipment or on county time.
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BUSINESS
By Baltimore Sun staff and news services | January 21, 2010
The housing market remains a significant risk to the economy, data released Wednesday showed, as bad weather across much of the country hammered the construction industry. Along with icy storms, the real estate recovery is facing man-made head winds. The government said Wednesday that buyers will face higher fees and tougher standards for home loans backed by the Federal Housing Administration, a popular source of loans for first-time buyers. And unemployment is expected to remain high throughout the year, which is likely to drive the foreclosure rate to new records.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | February 20, 2014
Laurel Park Reshuffled Fritchie gains Merry Meadow The field for Saturday's $300,000 Barbara Fritchie Handicap (G2) at Laurel Park is significantly different from the one originally scheduled to race last Saturday. Four of filly and mare sprinters will not be competing this weekend, while another has been added into the mix. Parx Racing-based Winning Image and Villette are not permitted to leave the Philadelphia track because of a quarantine after an equine herpes outbreak.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | April 14, 1991
Permits for Maryland's spring rockfish season, which open May 11, will be available at distribution centers this week. There is no charge for the permits, but there will be a limit of one per person, and the permit is required for anyone fishing for rockfish.L A Chesapeake Bay sportfishing license also will be required.During the special hook-and-line rockfish season, which closes May 27, fishermen will be limited to one fish measuring at least 36 inches long.Fishermen will be required to tag the fish through the gill immediately after landing it. The fish then must be checked in at a designated station on the day it is caught.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | February 12, 1992
The mayor of Annapolis is learning a lesson about parking in his hometown.In the city's historic district, where parking spots on thetraffic-clogged streets are at a premium, every residential sticker counts. Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins discovered that after he paid off a bet with five freebie permits.Although the mayor apologized and tried to smooth over the issue last week, frustrated residents won't let the matter drop. Complaining that they often must circle their homes to find a parking spot, several residents have questioned whether the problem is more widespreadand have called for a full investigation.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | April 3, 1992
When the mayor of Morningside came to Annapolis on a business trip, he got a permit that opened the gates to the state capital's crowded streets. Mayor Gerald Glaubitz, who presides over the hamlet of 1,200 people in southern Prince George's County, visited Annapolis' historic City Hall. He shook hands with Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins and leftwith a temporary permit that allowed him to park for free near the State House. It was one of Hopkins' many gestures of small-town hospitality.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | July 18, 1991
The Maryland Department of the Environment has modified its policy to allow printers to take possession of presses before they have the necessary permits to operate them.The decision was made this week after an article in The Evening Sun on Monday pointed out the plight of small printers who were finding it difficult to buy used presses because of the long waiting period for the permits.Under the federal Clean Air Act, the state must limit the quantity of volatile organic compounds -- such as gasoline vapors -- released into the air. The state requires a permit for such items as gasoline storage tanks, dry-cleaning machines, incinerators, chemical-processing equipment used by photographers, and printing presses.
NEWS
By Kim Clark | August 28, 1991
For years, the best Scott Warehime has been able to do when guests at the Tremont Hotel ask him to call them a cab has been to smile and say: "OK, you're a cab."The desk agent says dispatchers often wait dozens of rings before answering his calls, and then cars can take 15 minutes to swing by the downtown hotel."We need more cabs," he said.But Baltimore won't be getting any more for at least another 90 days.State regulators' proposal to issue 69 more permits to raise the number of licensed cabs on city streets to 1,151 has been stayed by a Baltimore City Circuit Court judge.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
More than four years after Maryland first moved to regulate its largest poultry and livestock farms, nearly 30 percent, or 169 operations, still do not have required state permits mandating measures to control polluted runoff from their chicken houses or feedlots. An environmental watchdog group, the Center for Progressive Reform, contends the state is lagging in protecting the Chesapeake Bay from pollution from such large-scale farms. The Washington-based center said in a new report that the state's regulatory effort is hampered by a lack of staff and skimpy inspections.
NEWS
By Rena Steinzor | December 26, 2013
If you own a car in Maryland, you know the experience. Every two years, you get a light brown envelope from the Motor Vehicle Administration with a bill for your automobile registration fee - $77.50 per year as of July, and more if your vehicle weighs two tons or more. Nobody particularly likes paying registration fees, but we do it. And somewhere in the back of our minds we recognize, grudgingly perhaps, that like driver's license renewal fees, registration fees help offset the cost of making sure vehicles on Maryland's roads are safe, that their polluting emissions are within acceptable limits, and that the people who drive them are licensed to do so. So far as I know, there's no way I could to get the MVA to waive my registration fee. If I want to drive my car, I have to pay. Fair enough.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 24, 2013
Baltimore city , Baltimore County and Prince George's County have been directed by the state to step up their efforts to reduce polluted runoff fouling local streams and the Chesapeake Bay. But environmental groups contend the mandates are too vague and weak, raising the possibility they may go to court to challenge them. The Maryland Department of the Environment ordered the three large jurisdictions to take a variety of similar actions over the next five years to curtail storm-water pollution, including reducing litter in water ways and retrofitting 20 percent of their streets, parking lots and buildings to catch or treat runoff.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 24, 2013
Environmental groups scored a win last week in their lawsuit contending that Montgomery County's state-mandated plan for curbing polluted runoff is lacking. Montgomery Circuit Court Judge Ronald B. Rubin ordered the Maryland Department of the Environment on Wednesday to revisit the storm-water permit it had issued the county in 2010 requiring reductions in pollution and trash from county streets, parking lots and existing buildings. Environmentalists had challenged the permit , arguing that it violated the Clean Water Act by failing to specify reductions needed in harmful discharges of nutrients, sediment and bacteria into the county's rivers and streams.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
More than four years after Maryland first moved to regulate its largest poultry and livestock farms, nearly 30 percent, or 169 operations, still do not have required state permits mandating measures to control polluted runoff from their chicken houses or feedlots. An environmental watchdog group, the Center for Progressive Reform, contends the state is lagging in protecting the Chesapeake Bay from pollution from such large-scale farms. The Washington-based center said in a new report that the state's regulatory effort is hampered by a lack of staff and skimpy inspections.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
Those who promote the right to carry around a handgun in public were no doubt disappointed by the U.S. Supreme Court's decision this week not to take up Maryland's handgun permit law. Certainly quite a few could be found sharing their rather disparaging views of the nation's highest court in colorful language on the Internet, including at baltimoresun.com. But what they should not be is surprised. While opponents of the Maryland law enjoyed a brief victory when a U.S. District Court judge found it violated the Second Amendment last year, that decision hinged on an overly broad view of District of Columbia V. Heller, the 2008 landmark Supreme Court case that spoke to the individual's right to own and bear firearms within the home.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Baltimore officials approved Wednesday a payment of nearly $100,000 to the American Civil Liberties Union to settle a longstanding federal lawsuit over protesters' rights in Baltimore. As part of the settlement, city officials agreed to loosen restrictions on protesting. The new rules allow groups of up to 30 people to protest or pass out fliers without obtaining a permit at all city parks and 10 designated locations, including McKeldin Square by the Inner Harbor. City Solicitor George Nilson, a member of the Board of Estimates, which authorized the deal, also said protesters can now obtain instant permits to hold demonstrations.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2000
Thirty-three Baltimore taxicab permits were auctioned off yesterday after the companies that held them defaulted on loan payments. Nine cab companies, all members of the Royal Taxicab Association Inc., had put up their combined 90 permits as collateral for a financing agreement. When they didn't make payments on time, the financier, Medallion Funding Corp. in New York, repossessed the permits. In an auction on Jan. 13, 45 permits were sold. Forty-five more were available yesterday, but 12 were not purchased and will be offered again Feb. 2. Just as the bidding began yesterday at Alex Cooper Auctioneers Inc. in Towson, a lawyer who represented the nine companies stood to protest the proceedings.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | September 23, 1992
The bell has rung for the "last round" in a two-year battle over illegal billboard advertising in Baltimore.The city zoning board has begun hearings on applications by a Baltimore company for permits for 89 "junior billboards" on the sides of buildings throughout the city. The applications are being vigorously contested by a coalition of community groups.The signs, which measure about 6 feet by 12 feet, often contain advertising for alcohol and tobacco products, are posted in poorer neighborhoods and are among several hundred a city Circuit Court judge ruled illegal two years ago.In December, Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan gave the company, Boisclair Advertising/Chesapeake Outdoor Enterprises, until Oct. 1 to obtain valid permits for the billboards or remove them.
BUSINESS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
The Baltimore District of the Army Corps of Engineers furloughed 45 employees, closed its regulatory offices and suspended the review of pending permit applications after running out of funds, a spokesman said Tuesday. Spokesman Chris Augsburger said the district, which makes permit decisions on projects that affect wetlands and waters, had enough funding to continue operations until Tuesday. Now, he said, its review of permit applications has been suspended until new funding becomes available.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
The U.S. Supreme Court said Tuesday that it will not examine Maryland's handgun permit law, leaving to stand a lower court ruling that the state's restrictive rules for carry permits do not unconstitutionally infringe upon gun-owners' rights. The justices did not explain their reasoning, but the decision intensified a simmering dispute over the limits of firearms restrictions. Other challenges are pending in federal courts — including two in Maryland attacking the state's new ban on military-style assault rifles and its requirements for fingerprinting and training of buyers before they can purchase handguns.
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