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Permit Process

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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer Capital News Service contributed to this article | November 16, 1994
David A. C. Carroll, secretary of the state Department of the Environment, is fond of recounting how a company had planned on spending three days slogging through the department's regulatory morass to only to find it took four hours to accomplish what they needed."
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2011
Long-awaited "streamlining" of the tangled state and federal red tape Maryland watermen must navigate for permission to establish oyster farming operations finally took effect Monday. Now, instead of seeking approvals from three separate state agencies and then the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, watermen can file a single, joint state-federal application with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. While the Corps still must issue a separate approval, it has agreed to a simplified "Regional General Permit" that federal officials say should shorten the process.
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NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | June 9, 1991
Most people don't like standing and waiting in line for something, but Michelle B. Harford doesn't mind -- especially if she's getting paid for it.Harford, 29, is the owner and operator of Professional Permit Expediting Service Inc.Her job is to spend time in county government office buildings obtaining building permits for contractors and corporations."
BUSINESS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley called Maryland's often lengthy and confusing business permit process "one of the weaknesses of our state" Thursday — and then signed an executive order aimed at easing it. The new program he ordered, called "Fast Track," is supposed to help speed projects with significant economic impact in specific areas — so long as they would not adversely affect the state's environmental and Smart Growth goals. A developer who qualifies for Fast Track will be told up front whether his or her proposal has any chance of being approved, or whether the state will fight "tooth and nail" against it, O'Malley said.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | December 10, 1992
Tom Mace's commercial construction company depends o quick turnaround time.A matter of weeks, or even days, can be the difference between getting a contract to do work for a customer and losing the business to another locale, Mr. Mace said.That's why the owner of Mace Construction Services Inc. in Elkridge is enthusiastic about the county government's new revved-up permit process for commercial projects. The "contingency construction start" system gives builders the option to begin limited interior construction after applying for a building permit.
NEWS
September 6, 1997
A ONE-TIME bowling alley at 4220 York Road is an unlikely spot for any restaurant, to say nothing of a 600-seatestablishment. Yet an entrepreneur wants to build Baltimore's biggest eatery on that deteriorated block, which has little off-street parking and is separated by a stone wall from the exclusive Guilford neighborhood.Until the surrounding community sounded the alarm, developer George M. Harris seemed to have a done deal. Even though he did not have adequate parking, the city issued him a construction permit last October for a ''restaurant, including live entertainment + dancing on 1st and 2d floor.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2003
Wilson Town residents urged an Anne Arundel County hearing officer yesterday not to grant more time to a Silver Spring developer to process permits for a hotly contested landfill and gravel pit proposal. G. Macy Nelson, a Towson attorney who is working with residents of the wooded hamlet near Odenton, said at a hearing in Annapolis that developer Warren E. Halle and his agents had failed to keep up with the state's complex permit process and did not deserve an extension. "They went about five years without asking what must be submitted [to the state]
NEWS
August 27, 1993
Last phase of housing project to start ahead of scheduleA developer building 3,000 houses near Laurel plans to begin construction on the final phase of the project next year, nearly two years ahead of schedule, the company announced yesterday.The owners of Russett, a planned community near Route 198 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, have taken advantage of a pilot program to expedite the county's building permit process, allowing construction of the final 900 houses to begin next summer.
NEWS
March 19, 1993
How right is the attorney who called an experimental program to speed the subdivision permit approval process a "no brainer." doesn't take a genius to see that the process would move faster if the 15 county, state and federal agencies that review development plans did so at the same time.Nonetheless, it's only now that officials are realizing the way they're doing business -- with each agency conducting its own review and making its own demands, only to be contradicted by the next agency -- makes no sense.
NEWS
January 26, 1994
Frankly, we think the 2,500 young people who attended the psychedelic "rave" party at the Timonium Fairgrounds on New Year's Eve got ripped off. They paid up to $25 to dance to ungodly loud music and be dazed by whirling lights and slow-motion movies of waterfalls, and paid $3 or $4 more to drink nonalcoholic concoctions with names like Orbit Juice and Oxygen Cocktails.If getting disoriented was their goal, they could have done it for free -- by attempting to follow how Baltimore County handled the rave -- before, during and after.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2011
A national gun control advocacy group weighed in Tuesday on a federal lawsuit that challenges Maryland's handgun permit laws, saying that the changes sought would be "bad law and even worse policy. " In an amicus brief, the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence urges the dismissal of a lawsuit brought last year by the Second Amendment Foundation on behalf of Hampstead resident Raymond Woollard, a Navy veteran who was denied a renewal of his handgun permit. Brady Center President Paul Helmke said in a statement that Maryland has "wisely rejected the gun lobby's agenda of 'any gun, anywhere for anybody.' Now the gun pushers want the courts to gut Maryland's laws and let virtually anyone carry a hidden handgun in public.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2010
Obama administration officials announced Tuesday they are taking steps to speed development of wind energy projects along the Atlantic coast, and hope to be able to issue federal leases for putting huge power-generating turbines off Ocean City within the next year. Speaking at a news conference at Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar unveiled a "Smart from the Start" initiative aimed at shortening the years-long federal approval process for offshore wind projects that now seem to be proceeding at a snail's pace.
NEWS
By Kate Yanchulis, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
Bobby Graves had misgivings about a pollution-control permit newly required for many farms in the state. But he applied, ready to detail how he's storing and disposing of the manure from his 110,000 chickens. Now, more than three months after seeking help from the Maryland Department of Agriculture in crafting a plan for reducing his farm's wastewater runoff — the final step needed for the permit — he's still waiting. And growing more frustrated with each passing day. "When I went in for my meeting with [a field service center]
NEWS
January 28, 2010
Looking at the state's pending storm water regulations ("Storm over storm water," Jan. 25) from the professional engineering community side of this issue, we are not opposed to taking on the unique challenges of the new storm water regulations for benefit of the environment. We are considerably concerned, however, about the confusion and further delays enforcement of these new regulations will cause in the permitting process, a process that is already muddled with backups and unresponsiveness, due in part to lack of personnel on the regulatory side and in part to the lack of decision making.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,chris.guy@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
CLARIFICATION A headline and article in Thursday's Anne Arundel section said that the County Council had turned down the county executive's proposal for hiring an ombudsman to assist property owners in land use, zoning and permit processes. While council members were skeptical about the proposal, they did not rule out future consideration.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2006
Speaking to a group of developers, the seven candidates for Anne Arundel County executive this week railed against the county's approval process for development, with most calling for an overhaul of the Department of Planning and Zoning to cut red tape - and the time - necessary to get permits. At a candidates forum before the Anne Arundel Commercial and Industrial Association on Wednesday in Gambrills, the five Republicans and two Democrats seeking to succeed Janet S. Owens said the current permit process needlessly delays projects for years and adds costs that are passed down to consumers.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
The last call was for a guy named "Boo."Then a power saw and a crowbar brought down the last of six illegal pay phones at the infamous corner of Fayette and Monroe streets -- a notorious drug corner in West Baltimore.City Councilman Martin O'Malley -- stirred by reports of hundreds of illegal pay phones in Baltimore that are used as vehicles for prostitution and illicit drug sales -- prodded officials of the city Department of Public Works during a hearing yesterday to leave the council chamber and cut the phone down.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2006
Speaking to a group of developers, the seven candidates for Anne Arundel County executive this week railed against the county's approval process for development, with most calling for an overhaul of the Department of Planning and Zoning to cut red tape - and the time - necessary to get permits. At a candidates forum before the Anne Arundel Commercial and Industrial Association on Wednesday in Gambrills, the five Republicans and two Democrats seeking to succeed Janet S. Owens said the current permit process needlessly delays projects for years and adds costs that are passed down to consumers.
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