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NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | January 12, 1992
County builders hope the twofold increase in residential building permit applications in the fourth quarter of 1991 over the same period in 1990 is a sign the economy is starting to recover.But other 1991 indicators show a less optimistic outlook, with residential applications down 49 percent from 1990 overall."Housing usually leads the economy out of a recession," said Jeffrey B. Powers, president of the Carroll chapter of the Home Builders Association of Maryland."We will have a better '92, but how much better is the question," said Powers of Powers Construction Co. in Westminster.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
Two weeks after Baltimore County police seized electronic gambling machines from a Dundalk bar co-owned by state Del. Joseph J. "Sonny" Minnick, authorities filed gambling-related charges against four people. Daniel J. Minnick, the delegate's 85-year-old brother and an owner of Minnick's Restaurant, a bartender and two customers were charged with illegal gambling and wagering. Daniel Minnick, who served in the House of Delegates from 1967-1982, also faces four counts of possessing slot machines.
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NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | July 14, 1991
The County Council has delayed until Tuesday a decision to shorten the time developers have to apply for building permits before new water and sewer hook-up fees take effect.The proposal, submitted by the county executive, would allow developers who have submitted building permit applications to the Department of Planning and Zoning by July 31 to be exempt from two new water and sewer hook-up fees, totaling $2,517.Tuesday is the council's last opportunity to consider the legislation before it dies.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
Oakland Mills Village Center will get another shot at a replacement restaurant for the Last Chance Saloon. Haluk "Alec" Kantur had planned to open a place called Rusty's Chill 'n Grill, but the county liquor board rejected him as a licensee this month. On Tuesday night, the County Council, sitting as the liquor board, agreed to allow the lease for the empty building to be sold to a new restaurant operator who could then apply for a liquor license without having to wait a year. Kantur said he is trying to find a buyer to extricate him from a 10-year lease at the village center, which last week celebrated the opening of a Food Lion supermarket.
NEWS
By Staff Report | December 26, 1993
ELKTON -- Permits for using the Elk Neck State Forest shooting range in Cecil County will no longer be honored at the Myrtle Grove Wildlife Management Area range in Charles County after Dec. 31, Department of Natural Resources authorities said this week.Permits had been honored at either location, department officials said.Separate permits will enable DNR officials to manage andmaintain each facility more effectively, said Jeffrey L. Horan of the department's Central Regional Office.Permits cost $20. For those over 65 or under 18, the price is $10. A birth certificate or driver's license is required for proof of age.1994 Elk Neck permit applications will be issued at the Regional Service Center, 2 S. Bond St. in Bel Air, at the Elk Neck State Forest Office in North East on Route 272, or at the Tawes State Office Building, 520 Taylor Ave., Annapolis.
NEWS
June 3, 1993
The Carroll County Permits Office has begun offering a new service to homeowners unable to make the regular weekday hours.The office will be open from 7:30 a.m. to noon one Saturday a month to allow residents to acquire permits for such home projects as swimming pools, storage sheds and minor remodeling.The next open Saturdays are June 5, July 10 and Aug. 7.Since the tax office will be closed Saturday, all payments must be made by check.A processing fee (minimum $25) is charged on all county permit applications.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | September 20, 1990
A state hiring freeze has left Maryland's new program to regulate development in freshwater wetlands with only about half of its planned staff, prompting developers and environmentalists alike to worry that the controversial effort may get off to a bad start Jan. 1.Twenty of the 39 positions budgeted for the state's non-tidal wetlands program remain to be filled, said David Burke, chief of non-tidal wetlands in the Maryland Department of Natural Resources."
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | May 13, 1993
Maryland Department of Natural Resources officials have granted a permit to the Wal-Mart discount retail chain to bulldoze slightly less than an acre of forested wetlands to make room for a new store near the interchange of Belair Road and White Marsh Boulevard.Wal-Mart and Baltimore County officials have said the 20-acre, mostly wooded site is a prime location for a 116,000-square-foot store and 750-car parking lot.Residents say the store isn't needed and, if built, would destroy the last open space in an area rapidly consumed by development.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | September 4, 1994
After three public meetings and consultation with its Wildlife Advisory Commission, the Department of Natural Resources has submitted its 1994-95 waterfowl hunting season and bag limit selections for federal approval.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is expected to approve Maryland's proposals, which include expanded hunting dates for most species of ducks and Canada geese."These seasons and bag limits are designed to maximize hunting opportunity while continuing to allow populations to increase," DNR Secretary Torrey C. Brown said Friday, when the selections were announced.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1995
Building applications to turn Manresa, the former Broadneck retreat center, into an assisted living facility for the elderly are being reviewed by the county Permit Application Center this week.The new owners of Manresa-on-the-Severn last week submitted interior demolition permit applications so a Baltimore-based contractor can start turning the 34,000 square-foot mansion into an 86-bed center.Under the permit applications, the American Health Foundation (AHF), an Ohio nonprofit group that bought the Severn River waterfront property May 31, wants to put a three-story, 15,000 square-foot addition on the back of the frame house.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2003
The rush is on for home building permits in Harford County. Responding to fears that certain, fast-growing regions of the county could be closed to development in the future, home builders have been showing up in record numbers in recent weeks to obtain permits needed to protect their projects, according to the county's Office of Planning and Zoning. The technicians processing the requests told Nancy Lipski, chief of site plan and permit review, that "this is crazy" and that the activity has reached levels not seen in years, she said.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2002
With the snip of a super-size pair of scissors, Mayor Martin O'Malley cut the ribbon yesterday on a new "one-stop shop" for city permits that he said will reduce the bureaucratic delays that builders complain discourage construction in the city. The renovated $450,000 offices in the city's Housing Department at 417 E. Fayette St. will reduce the time required to get permits approved by up to three weeks, city housing officials said at a news conference. The process was so long and convoluted, developers used to hire "expediters" -- consultants -- to walk building permit applications from cubicle to cubicle, office to office and building to building.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2002
A California company that sought to bury more than 300 miles of fiber-optic cable under the Chesapeake Bay and several tributaries pulled its application for permits yesterday after scrutiny from elected officials and an environmental watchdog group. Expressing surprise at the public outcry about their project, officials with ClearStream Communications Inc. of Sacramento said they needed to update environmental data in their proposal before the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Maryland Department of the Environment to build an underwater telecommunications network from Baltimore to Norfolk, Va. While still interested in pursuing the project here - and perhaps extending it north through New York - ClearStream officials could not say for sure yesterday whether they would resubmit the application.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1999
To offset thousands of dollars in costs for police and other services, Annapolis should toughen requirements for block parties, fun runs and other events staged in the city, a mayoral committee recommended yesterday.The committee urged that all nonprofit groups be required to foot half of Annapolis' event-related costs and that city officials re-examine their stadium parking agreement with the Naval Academy Athletic Association."This sets down a policy, which we really don't have now," said former Annapolis City Administrator John L. Prehn Jr., who chaired the committee.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
Bethlehem Steel Corp. is exploring whether to rebuild and reopen a controversial coke oven battery at its Sparrows Point mill, which it closed in 1991 after environmental disputes that cost the company $3.5 million in fines and led to the layoff of 400 workers.The company said it has not decided whether to rebuild one of its three old coke ovens, which bake coal until the heat converts it into coke. Coke is used to fire ultra-hot steelmaking furnaces.But Beth Steel has filed a permit application with the state Department of the Environment.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | July 5, 1995
Residential development review fees nearly quadrupled and building permit fees doubled Monday, a move county officials said will raise almost $1.6 million and help ensure that development pays for the services it uses.Builders said the increases simply raise the price of a home."The only folks who pay these bills are the folks trying to get a home," said Richard L. Hull, president of Carroll Land Services Inc. in Westminster."The politicians are not helping the consumers, they're hurting them," the land development consultant said.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2003
The rush is on for home building permits in Harford County. Responding to fears that certain, fast-growing regions of the county could be closed to development in the future, home builders have been showing up in record numbers in recent weeks to obtain permits needed to protect their projects, according to the county's Office of Planning and Zoning. The technicians processing the requests told Nancy Lipski, chief of site plan and permit review, that "this is crazy" and that the activity has reached levels not seen in years, she said.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | January 13, 1991
County builders are looking forward to spring, when the air is fresh, the flowers are blooming -- and houses have a better chance of selling."Spring perks a lot of things up," said Thomas H. Lentzner, avice president at Union National Bank in Westminster who handles loans to builders.Some area builders predict the housing market, which has slowed in the last year, will pick up this spring, depending on what happens in the Middle East."We still have a lot of interested people, butit's difficult to get them to make a long-term commitment with the economy and what's happening in the Middle East," said Martin K. P. Hill of Masonry Contractors Inc. in Manchester.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1995
Building applications to turn Manresa, the former Broadneck retreat center, into an assisted living facility for the elderly are being reviewed by the county Permit Application Center this week.The new owners of Manresa-on-the-Severn last week submitted interior demolition permit applications so a Baltimore-based contractor can start turning the 34,000 square-foot mansion into an 86-bed center.Under the permit applications, the American Health Foundation (AHF), an Ohio nonprofit group that bought the Severn River waterfront property May 31, wants to put a three-story, 15,000 square-foot addition on the back of the frame house.
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