Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPermission
IN THE NEWS

Permission

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
Orioles minor league pitcher Dontrelle Willis has reportedly left the club's Triple-A affliate in Norfolk without the organization's permission after being placed on the minor league restricted list, but the Orioles appear to have no plans to release the left-hander. Willis, the 2003 NL Rookie of the Year and 2005 NL Cy Young Award runner-up, was signed by the Orioles in the spring to become a situational left-handed reliever. He had signed with the Phillies in the offseason but was released midway through spring training.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
The Maryland Republican Party admitted Wednesday that it used a trademarked logo of the Baltimore Ravens to raise funds without seeking the team's permission. The party's executive director said it had been an error on his part. The unauthorized use of the purple-and-black logo and Ravens shield came as the party publicized a fundraiser at a private home in Edgewater. In emails, on Facebook and on the party Web page, the state GOP used the logo to invite people to "an afternoon of Ravens football and Republican Party politics" during Sunday's game against the Cleveland Browns.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | March 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - I went to President Bush's White House news conference Thursday to see how he was wrestling with the momentous issue of Iraq. One line he uttered captured all the things that were troubling me about his approach. It was when he said: "When it comes to our security, we really don't need anybody's permission." The first thing that bothered me was the phrase, "When it comes to our security." Fact: The invasion of Iraq today is not vital to American security. Saddam Hussein has neither the intention nor the capability to threaten America, and is easily deterrable if he does.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
The Maryland Renaissance Festival organizers have appealed a zoning decision that prevents the festival from moving to a new site in southern Anne Arundel County. Earlier this month, the county's administrative hearing officer denied requests from the festival for a special exception and variances to allow the festival to operate on a Lothian farm that lacks required "major road" access. The case now moves to the county's seven-member Board of Appeals. A hearing has not yet been scheduled.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
The Orioles have granted the Boston Red Sox permission to interview Rick Peterson for their pitching coach position, and he will interview for the job, an industry source confirmed. Peterson spent this year as the Orioles' director of pitching development. He was previously a pitching coach for the Oakland Athletics , New York Mets , and Milwaukee Brewers . Peterson will be the second member of the organization to interview with the Red Sox this offseason. Third-base coach DeMarlo Hale interviewed for Boston's managerial job, which ultimately went to John Farrell.
NEWS
December 23, 1990
The County Council has given permission to MCI Inc., which owns a microwave tower in the Carsins Run area near the Interstate 95 Maryland House rest stop, to install a water line into the property to connect the county's public water service."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | October 3, 1994
MCI Metro, a subsidiary of MCI Communications Corp., applied to the Maryland Public Service Commission today for permission to compete with Bell Atlantic Corp. in the local telephone market.The Maryland filing was part of the first major offensive launched by the nation's second-largest long-distance company in its long-expected assault on the regional Bells' near-monopoly hold on the nation's local telephone business.MCI also applied today to provide local phone service in four other states: Pennsylvania, Illinois, Michigan and Washington.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | February 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Another state -- North Dakota -- got a federal court's permission yesterday to start enforcing an anti-abortion law as the impact of the Supreme Court's latest ruling on that issue continued to spread across the country.Chief U.S. District Judge Rodney S. Webb of Fargo, N.D., ruled that the state's 24-hour waiting period and government-required doctor's medical-legal discussion of the abortion procedure to a woman seeking an abortion could now be enforced, 18 months after he had originally blocked it from going into effect.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1998
The Orioles have cleared a significant hurdle in their search for a successor to general manager Pat Gillick: The Cleveland Indians granted them permission to interview assistant general manager Dan O'Dowd. But access to O'Dowd, a leading candidate, is conditional, according to sources familiar with the talks.Indians owner Richard Jacobs and general manager John Hart stipulated that O'Dowd's availability is contingent upon an agreement that no Indians personnel follow O'Dowd to Baltimore for a specified length of time.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | April 13, 1991
CSX Transportation Inc., which has been struggling to reduce its costs, has won the right to cut its train crew sizes from four to three on almost every mile of its 18,800-mile system.By winning the United Transportation Union's permission to cut one brakeman from its train crews, CSX has caught up with most of its major railroad competitors, according to Jeffrey Medford, who follows the rail industry for Wheat First Securities in Richmond, Va.As recently as 18 months ago, Richmond-based CSX had an average of 4.3 workers on each train, Mr. Medford explained.
NEWS
June 25, 2014
In response to Susan Reimer 's interesting column about the tendency of women to apologize to excess ( "What are women apologizing for?" June 23), I have observed this lack of confidence in the behavior of mothers trying to control unruly children in public. They invariably append the suffix, "OK?" to their "request" for better behavior. It only weakens the direction to your child and confuses him or her as to what is right. What mom says is right and she needn't ask her child's permission (OK?
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
A U.S. Court of Appeals panel has upheld a decision that Maryland strayed into federal-only territory when it tried to jump start construction of a power plant with subsidies. The Maryland Public Service Commission, concerned about reliability problems if more power plants aren't built, struck a deal for ratepayers to subsidize a natural gas-fired facility in Waldorf any time the wholesale price for its electricity fell below a certain level. The plant was slated to open next year.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
The daughter of an NBA player or coach must make certain sacrifices. The league's time commitment could hardly be more demanding. Maryland freshman guard Lexie Brown is a realist. She knows that her father - Sacramento Kings assistant coach Dee Brown - would have a difficult time breaking away from his team to watch Lexie and the Terps in Sunday night's Final Four game against undefeated Notre Dame in Nashville, Tenn. But she remained hopeful. “Every year since about 10th grade he's really missed a lot of my basketball seasons, but he's always managed to make it to the state playoffs and now the Elite Eight game,” she said Thursday.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2014
Two Maryland legislators are sponsoring a bill to halt giving the state's annual tests this year as opposition to the testing grows among teachers, parents and local superintendents. A bill introduced in the House by Del. Eric G. Luedtke, a Montgomery Democrat, would force state education officials to seek a waiver from the federal law that requires the annual standardized tests, which are given in March. The sponsors say that the Maryland School Assessments would serve no purpose this year because students are being taught a new curriculum but tested on the old one. "Parents are in an uproar over this all across the state.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Cases involving establishments that may have been operating in violation of city liquor laws, outside the parameters of their specific license or without a proper license at all are among the hearings listed on the Sept. 26 docket of the Board of Liquor License Commissioners for Baltimore City. Among the establishments scheduled for hearings on Sept. 26 are Canton's Portside Tavern , where after-hours drinking allegedly took place on April 7, Phillips Seafood , which was allegedly operating without a valid license on May 7 and The Chesapeake , which was observed providing outdoor table service on July 19 and 20 (Artscape weekend)
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Henrietta Lacks had no control when doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital used her cells 62 years ago in research that led to groundbreaking medical advances. But now her descendants will. The National Institutes of Health said Wednesday that it had reached an agreement with Lacks' family that requires scientists to get permission from the government agency to use her genome, or genetic blueprint. It was derived from cells taken from the 31-year-old from Turners Station after she died from an aggressive form of cervical cancer in 1951.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2000
Integrated Health Services Inc., the bankrupt health care provider, has received court permission to hire a broker and sell more than half of its corporate campus in Sparks. If the sale goes as planned, the land could bring top-tier office development to Baltimore County and an infusion of cash to the troubled company struggling to reorganize. IHS sought the U.S. Bankruptcy Court's permission to hire TriAlliance Commercial Real Estate Services LLC of Towson to market the property, which the health care provider bought in 1997 for $6.2 million.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 1, 1993
Cheer up. Rupert Murdoch was given permission to save the New York Post while owning a television station in the same market.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Baltimore County prosecutors will not be allowed to use information provided by James D. Laboard's lawyer on the night that the off-duty police officer allegedly killed a Randallstown teenager, a judge ruled Friday. During a criminal motions hearing, Circuit Judge Jan Marshall Alexander ruled that the lawyer's decision to talk to detectives violated attorney-client confidentiality. Prosecutors said the ruling would have little effect on the case. Laboard, a Baltimore County police officer, is charged with two counts of manslaughter in the death of 17-year-old Christopher Brown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
If there is a single work that captures the essence of America in sound and movement, it's "Appalachian Spring," the ballet with music by Aaron Copland and choreography by Martha Graham that premiered in 1944 at the Library of Congress. Although the sonic part of the piece is never out of earshot, thanks to the perennially performed orchestral suite Copland fashioned from the score, the opportunity to experience the music and dance in its original form doesn't come around every day. Since last fall, students at the Baltimore School for the Arts have been delving into the ballet from every angle, preparing for "An Appalachian Spring Festival," an interdisciplinary project that includes an art exhibit, a concert and panel discussions.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.