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NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2006
State lottery officials who once introduced pine-scented tickets to Maryland's gambling enthusiasts are banking that holiday shoppers will also fork over $20 for a shot at a $1 million stocking stuffer. The state's first-of-its-kind raffle will have a limited run -- 420,000 tickets -- with winners announced on television New Year's Eve. "The style of this -- with a definite start and stop date during the holidays -- we thought would fit well with gift-giving and office parties," said Jimmy White, a spokesman for the Maryland Lottery, the proceeds of which go to the general fund of the state treasury.
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BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,Sun Reporter | October 24, 2006
The top two SafeNet Inc. executives, who resigned last week as a result of a stock options investigation, have agreed not to cash in most of their options pending a determination of whether they were fired or resigned, a process that could take months. Anthony A. Caputo, former chairman and chief executive of the Harford County encryption company, and Carole Argo, who was president, chief operating officer and acting chief financial officer, agreed not to exercise options that the company finds were improperly dated and for which it will have to take a charge, according to a SafeNet filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 13, 2006
Why hasn't Eli Lilly & Co. stock performed better? It's a big retirement holding of mine. - R.C., via the Internet Although the pharmaceutical giant will continue to be a big-time player, its lowered expectations for the rest of this year have taken a toll on its stock. After previously forecasting 7 percent to 9 percent sales growth for 2006, management now expects results in the lower end of that range. That's due in part to disappointing sales of its insulin drugs. It also faces increased competition for its Zyprexa antipsychotic medication, which is its top-selling drug but has seen its sales slip slightly in the United States.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
LAS VEGAS -- Last summer after winning $4.25 million for finishing second in the World Series of Poker championship event, Anne Arundel County accountant Steve Dannenmann vowed that the unexpected fortune and likely fame would not change his life. It hasn't. Unless you count being stopped by strangers who want to have their picture taken with him. Or attending charity poker events at the Playboy Mansion in Los Angeles. Or playing in golf tournaments with Baltimore Ravens. Or being recognized at fancy parties by Hollywood celebrities who want to chat.
TRAVEL
By AMY GUNDERSON and AMY GUNDERSON,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2006
Poached sea bass with sun-dried tomato vinaigrette, seared ahi tuna with ponzu sauce served over napa cabbage, filet mignon with chimichurri sauce: They sound like items on a menu at a four-star resort, not something to chow down on while wedged into seat 34B. But as airlines have pared their meal services down to a bag of pretzels or chips on domestic flights -- if even that -- more resorts have stepped in with the latest must-have amenity: the to-go...
NEWS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN and LAURA SMITHERMAN,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
Under Armour Inc. CEO Kevin A. Plank, whose stock holdings in the Baltimore sports-apparel company are worth more than a half-billion dollars, had shareholders pick up the $468 tab for his health club dues last year. That's just one of a raft of perks that corporations have disclosed recently in annual proxy statements, from car leases to corporate jet rides, from home security systems to golf clubs. Although perks have long been bestowed on corporate chiefs, companies are increasingly divulging even the cheapest of fringe benefits in the interest of transparency and ahead of rules, expected to take effect next year, that would compel far more disclosure.
NEWS
June 12, 2006
Members of Congress and their aides are willing to sacrifice a lot to keep their jobs - privacy, regular work hours and employment security, for example. But as House Speaker Dennis Hastert discovered, don't ask them to give up lavish junkets to exotic places at the expense of folks looking for their official help. No matter how fishy such travel might look to critics and political opponents, this is one perk the denizens of Capitol Hill refuse to give up. Little wonder. An extensive review of almost six years' worth of disclosure forms by journalistic and public interest groups revealed lawmakers and staff members took at least 23,000 trips valued at almost $50 million courtesy of corporations, trade associations and nonprofit groups with a stake in the business of Congress.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER and TIMOTHY B. WHEELER,SUN REPORTER | May 27, 2006
Todd and Nancy Armstrong found themselves in a suburban twilight zone this spring when they ordered a pizza the first night after moving into their newly built townhouse near Aberdeen. It took three hours - and a lot of help over the telephone - for the delivery driver to find their place. That was just the beginning. For the next few weeks, they couldn't get their mail forwarded, or change the billing address for their credit cards, because the Postal Service had no record of their street.
TRAVEL
By JAY CLARKE and JAY CLARKE,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 30, 2006
Airlines boast about them. Credit card companies tempt you with them. People hoard them. Collectors trade them. Frequent flier miles have become a currency. And now, with the 25th anniversary of this wildly successful program coming tomorrow, the miles game is more heated than ever. Miles no longer are used just to get free flights. You can use them to buy digital cameras, magazine subscriptions, hotel stays, dining certificates and a whole host of other products. Four airlines have created online auctions where frequent fliers can bid on such items as vacations, spa treatments or a ticket to a Broadway play.
BUSINESS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN and LAURA SMITHERMAN,SUN REPORTER | March 19, 2006
The image of the fat-cat CEO might soon get a little fatter. Under a regulatory proposal that appears to be headed for approval this year, corporate America would be forced to disclose a raft of previously unreported perks and payouts to its top executives. The disclosures might extend from housekeeping services and yachts to lavish severance packages. "This will certainly trigger some `Oh my's' when everything is included," said Steve Van Putten, who leads an executive compensation practice at Washington-based Watson Wyatt World- wide.
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