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By Tom Hamburger and Tom Hamburger,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 12, 2008
WASHINGTON - Jim Johnson, the former top aide to Walter F. Mondale whose later career as a highly compensated businessman and political insider stirred controversy, resigned as adviser to Barrack Obama's presidential campaign yesterday, saying attention to his personal finances had become a distraction to the campaign. Obama had appointed Johnson as part of a three-member team heading the search for a vice presidential running mate. Johnson had drawn criticism for compensation and other perks he received as an official of mortgage giant Fannie Mae and as a board member of United HealthCare, one of the nation's largest providers of medical insurance.
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BUSINESS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | April 2, 2008
If you believed everything you heard or read yesterday, presidential candidates would settle their race in a bowling alley, a cat park would be coming soon to a vacant lot in Annapolis, and a new e-mail service could send messages back in time. From cyberspace to outer space, April Fools' Day pranks ran rampant yesterday. And in addition to the phony news releases and crank phone calls, corporations continued a recent trend of jumping on the hoax bandwagon. Among yesterday's corporate ruses was Google's debut of "Gmail Custom Time," a service that enables users to send e-mail messages with time stamps from the past.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,sun reporter | July 8, 2007
Lockheed Martin Corp.'s CEO Robert J. Stevens has had a lucrative career at the nation's largest defense contractor, and his pay has been outlined to shareholders for years. But investors didn't know how lucrative his retirement could be. The Bethesda-based company has disclosed for the first time that in addition to $5.2 million in salary and bonus, plus stock awards and perks last year, Stevens also accrued more than $2 million in three pension plans, two 401(k) plans and a tax-advantaged plan mostly used by the corporate elite.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | July 6, 2007
Come summertime, many employees at public relations and marketing firm Imre Communications in Towson take off early Fridays to jump-start their beach weekend, spend a mother-daughter day at the salon or to run errands. At 1 p.m., "the stampede starts," said Martha Mallonee, Imre's vice president in charge of associations accounts. But Mallonee and the other 20 or so stampeders on a recent Friday weren't playing hooky. It's company policy. Imre's half-days on Fridays is one example of how employers are offering flexible hours and schedules during summer's hazy days when distractions are plenty, workplace consultants say. Of course, managers still expect work to be completed, deadlines to be met and offices to be staffed.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | April 22, 2007
Some say the age of company-paid golf memberships, vacations and financial advice is waning for corporate bigwigs. "You're actually seeing CEOs coming along saying, `Take my country club - please!' " says Steven Hall, a New York-based executive-compensation consultant. If so, many local companies haven't heard. Executive perquisites are alive and well in Maryland - especially in Towson, where Black & Decker CEO Nolan Archibald enjoyed club membership, a car and driver, personal use of company planes and other perks worth $584,374 last year, according to a recently filed proxy statement.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | March 11, 2007
My fully organic father-in-law retired from gardening and withdrew to an assisted-living community in southern Pennsylvania, where he still manages to plant leeks, tomatoes and shallots between the shrubs. (Please don't tell anyone; it might be a code violation.) He's a generous man, but now he only grows enough vegetables and herbs for himself and his wife, so we no longer expect to receive the gifts of Swiss chard, endive, peppers and carrots that used to come by the bushel. And did I mention potatoes?
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | February 7, 2007
Next month, a 3-foot Starbucks logo will adorn the historic Main Street facade where inside Revolutionary schemes were once traded over draughts of ale and cider. The opening of the city's third outlet of the worldwide coffee chain in late March will cap a year of securing city approvals and renovations in the Maryland Inn - but it is not likely to decaffeinate the controversy. For a few critics, including Mayor Ellen O. Moyer, another link of the worldwide gourmet coffee chain was about as welcome as the British Redcoats back in Washington's day. She called the idea "a missed opportunity for something really special."
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,Morning Call | February 4, 2007
Age discrimination is running rampant in America, and people older than 50 should take full advantage of it. Price discounts abound for the more mature crowd, but you have to know where to look. Joan Rattner Heilman knows. She has written the 2007-2008 edition of Unbelievably Good Deals and Great Adventures That You Absolutely Can't Get Unless You're Over 50. It's important information for the nearly one in four Americans older than 50. Their ranks are swelling every day, and businesses have noticed this group and its huge buying power.
NEWS
December 28, 2006
No doubt a lot of people were appalled at the news that Thomas L. Bromwell, the former Baltimore County state senator soon to be tried on federal corruption charges, is getting $400,000 and 18 months of health benefits to voluntarily step down from a plum state job. But let's make sure the public is indignant about the right thing. The problem is not the amount of money involved (a sum determined at the time of his hiring) or his potential guilt (because that's yet to be decided). It's the Annapolis insider mentality that puts a veteran legislator in such a job in the first place and keeps him there as long as possible.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | December 17, 2006
Jennifer Torgerson, a full-time lecturer at Coppin State University since 1999, frequently teaches six courses every semester, nearly double the instructional workload of a typical university professor. For her labors, the 38-year-old philosophy instructor with two master's degrees receives a base salary of about $33,000, plus overtime, but no health insurance, retirement plan or other fringe benefits afforded to most regular full-time state employees. Despite personal difficulties - she has $45,000 in debts from graduate school and can't afford the $4,000 annual cost of a health insurance policy - Torgerson hasn't considered quitting.
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