Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPerks
IN THE NEWS

Perks

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 22, 2010
Not only should members of Congress who opposed "Obamacare" decline to participate in the government-subsidized health plan for federal workers ( "Democrats keep heat on Andy Harris over health care flap," Nov. 18) they should also never make use of the free clinic located in the Capitol building and also subsidized by the taxpayers and available to Congress. Gerry Emery, Columbia
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ted Kruse | November 17, 2013
Today, I became old. The Federal government told me so. An official letter from the Social Security Administration announced my eligibility for Medicare. The envelope also contained a red, white and blue Medicare card. The patriotic color theme continued in a 32-page booklet explaining Medicare in age-appropriate 14-point type. The official pronouncement of being declared old is a reminder that life is full of rites of passage: starting school, getting a driver's license, graduating from high school and getting married.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 13, 2010
I read with interest your front page article "Midei's attorney calls doctor's ties to industry commonplace" (Dec. 11). In discussing how Dr. Mark Midei "allowed Abbott Laboratories to throw parties at his Monkton home and accepted thousands of dollars in consulting fees," his attorney, Stephen L. Snyder, concluded: "it was business as usual for the medical profession. … All of these events were legal; they are done uniformly by all practitioners. " Ridiculous! I've practiced medicine for over 40 years, and I must have gotten in the wrong line.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
Most checking accounts pay little or no interest, and fewer and fewer are free. But at Patapsco Bank in Dundalk, checking customers can earn about 2 percent a year in a free account or choose cash back or even iTunes rewards. And members of Money One Federal Credit Union in Largo can receive as much as 3 percent. Both institutions participate in a national rewards program for community banks and credit unions called Kasasa that helps them structure and market free checking accounts.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
I am sick of hearing the excuses from the mayor's office when it comes to the inappropriate use of taxpayer money, taxpayer-owned sports boxes and tickets - graft - that come from places like First Mariner Arena ("Mayor's use of tickets examined," Aug. 15). Stephanie Rawlings-Blakemade herself out as a highly ethical politician who would never be what Sheila Dixon had become during her term as mayor. But the reality is, Ms. Rawlings-Blake is about to spend $2,000 of the taxpayers' money for police protection in California while she and her family are on vacation.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | April 9, 1992
The sudden panic and the political posturing over ''perks'' ought to offend the intelligence of even an angry public. President Bush is trying to exploit the situation by talking about ''the hopelessly tangled congressional web of PACs, perks, privileges, partnership and paralysis.'' House Speaker Tom Foley has lashed Mr. Bush as ''the king of perks'' and Vice President Quayle as the ''crown prince of perks.''At some time someone with no personal or political ax to grind must tell the public which perks are in the national interest, and which are abuses by pols and bureaucrats blinded by the arrogance of power.
HEALTH
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2010
When Thomas Seitz sought out a hospital for treatment of his liver disease, the perks were nearly as important as the quality of care. The 58-year-old retired commercial fisherman from Ocean City wanted a private room - free from the noises of another patient - with some additional amenities that reminded him of home. He wound up going to Franklin Square Hospital Center in Rosedale. There, he channel-surfed on a flat-screen TV with a remote that could also adjust the room lighting or request room-service meals.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Responding to growing public disgust over government freebies, the Bush administration has ordered its own perks purge to identify areas that make the president and his people look as though they're wasting taxpayers' money.Despite the order to scour for perks, Budget Director Richard Darman drew the line yesterday at requiring President Bush to give up Air Force One, saying Americans believe that "the dignity of office" should permit George Bush to travel on the Boeing 747 luxury aircraft.
NEWS
By Capital News Service | January 30, 1994
WASHINGTON -- If Rep. Roscoe Bartlett has his way, congressional perks such as a members dining room and free parking at Washington National Airport and the Capitol will become obsolete.When people see special privilege, "They say, 'Gee, that reminds me, I really do hate Congress,' " the Frederick Republican said in a recent interview.He said Congress does not need that image.Mr. Bartlett is drafting a bill that he said would do away with many of the perks and also would remove the exemptions Congress has carved out for itself from many laws -- such as those prohibiting age and sex discrimination.
NEWS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN and LAURA SMITHERMAN,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
Under Armour Inc. CEO Kevin A. Plank, whose stock holdings in the Baltimore sports-apparel company are worth more than a half-billion dollars, had shareholders pick up the $468 tab for his health club dues last year. That's just one of a raft of perks that corporations have disclosed recently in annual proxy statements, from car leases to corporate jet rides, from home security systems to golf clubs. Although perks have long been bestowed on corporate chiefs, companies are increasingly divulging even the cheapest of fringe benefits in the interest of transparency and ahead of rules, expected to take effect next year, that would compel far more disclosure.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman has vetoed a bill that would boost a retirement perk for public safety unions because she said the County Council improperly added a firefighters' union to the bill even though the union hadn't asked for it. Neuman said in a statement on Tuesday that the council's addition of Local 1563 of the International Association of Fire Fighters to the bill "undermines the labor relations process of contract negotiations....
SPORTS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
Handlers used special massage techniques to soothe Goldencents' muscular frame and sudsy sponges to stimulate the shine and bloom on the Preakness competitor's chocolate-colored coat - while a sizable entourage seemed transfixed. Outside the Pimlico stables, a green oasis tucked inside urban Northwest Baltimore, a crowd had gathered around Goldencents. Photographers took pictures. A cluster of men, women and children from a sunrise tour stopped to stare. Security guards looked on. The list of helpers, assistants and advisers for Goldencents and the other Preakness all-stars is longer than Stacy Keibler's prep team on Oscar night - grooms, exercise riders, hot walkers, trainers, jockeys, veterinarians, stall muckers, chiropractors, ultrasound technicians and nutritionists.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2013
Baltimore County Council members took heat again last week over their use of taxpayer-funded cars, a rare perk among local councils in the Baltimore area. At a meeting in Towson, county resident Mary Locke said she was surprised to learn that Councilman Todd Huff was behind the wheel of a county-issued, "gas guzzling" Jeep Grand Cherokee last month when he was arrested on drunken-driving charges. She questioned whether the county is doing enough to ensure that the vehicles aren't misused.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Open a credit card account and you might walk away with more than just plastic. Banks and their vendors heavily hawk card-related services, such as credit monitoring, that can add up to hundreds of dollars of year in fees. But often consumers don't need these add-ons. In fact, they can take a few simple steps for little or no money and enjoy protections and access to information similar to what's promised by the services. Federal regulators have taken note — and action.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
I am sick of hearing the excuses from the mayor's office when it comes to the inappropriate use of taxpayer money, taxpayer-owned sports boxes and tickets - graft - that come from places like First Mariner Arena ("Mayor's use of tickets examined," Aug. 15). Stephanie Rawlings-Blakemade herself out as a highly ethical politician who would never be what Sheila Dixon had become during her term as mayor. But the reality is, Ms. Rawlings-Blake is about to spend $2,000 of the taxpayers' money for police protection in California while she and her family are on vacation.
NEWS
August 8, 2012
Here are the best things you can say about Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's use of complementary tickets to shows at 1st Mariner Arena : Every mayor has done it, and the number of tickets she and her family used make up a relatively small portion of those her office doled out. And it's not like she was stealing gift cards from poor kids. Indeed, there are plenty of worse things she could do, but plenty of better ones, too. In the grand scheme of challenges Ms. Rawlings-Blake has faced - from budget deficits to out of control pension obligations - this doesn't amount to much.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | March 29, 1992
WASHINGTON -- When it comes to the perquisites of power, people who live in White Houses shouldn't throw stones.So say the Democratic leaders of Congress. They've been watching in agonized disbelief as President Bush gleefully tries to exploit the lawmakers' troubles over the House bank scandal. They're irked that he, of all people, is advancing the image of public servants too bloated on perks and privileges to serve the public."He lives a life like no other human being in the world," observed Rep. Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland, chairman of the House Democratic Caucus.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Pelline and Jeff Pelline,San Francisco Chronicle | March 15, 1992
While rank-and-file employees don't receive as many perquisites as chief executives -- or members of the House of Representatives, for that matter -- many get benefits that seem impressive in these financially difficult times.Airline employees receive free or cheap plane tickets. Utility workers get discounts on their telephone and energy bills. Retail clerks save money on clothing and stereos. Bank employees get free checking accounts and low-interest loans. These perks can save an employee hundreds and even thousands of dollars annually, and in many cases they are extended to retired employees as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2012
There's a fun new neighbor at Harborplace. Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. moved into the Light Street Pavilion in May, and the old mall, which had been looking down in the mouth, feels lively again — like a place people might actually have chosen to visit. Founded in Monterey, Calif., in 1996, the chain of casual seafood restaurants was inspired by a shrimp-loving character in the movie "Forrest Gump. " The Bubba Gump menu is packed with shrimp dishes, and the decor of a typical Bubba Gump restaurant is meant to suggest the waterside shrimp restaurant that the characters in the movie might have opened.
NEWS
June 8, 2012
Shame on The Sun for burying the story of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's recall election victory ("Wis. Governor survives recall," June 6). Governor Walker not only won he trounced his opponent by 7 percentage points. Wisconsin voters made a bold statement by recognizing states can no longer afford to subsidize public pensions and perks with taxpayer dollars. If public sector unions want these perks they need to pay for them out of their pockets. No longer can the taxpayers afford to give these luxuries.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.